2017 CHA International Conference Speakers

Peggy Adams

CHA Past President Peggy Adams has been on the CHA board for nine years and is a CHA Clinician and was the 2016 CHA Distinguished Service Award winner. She previously taught and coached riding at her own farm, PLA HorsePlay, and worked for the Girl Scouts for 30 years in a variety of managerial positions. She currently lives with her husband in Mrtyle Beach, South Carolina. 

What to Expect at a CHA Clinic 

Dessert Round Tables

Come and join our current CHA Board of Directors for a fun and educational evening. 

Dave Andrick

Dave is the Group Vice President of the AIM Equine Network and has been an active part of the horse industry for more than 10 years. In 2011, when the equine industry experienced an escalating unwanted horse population due to the economic downturn, Dave founded AIM’s A Home for Every Horse, a program that in the last four years has placed thousands of unwanted horses in permanent homes and brought much needed resources to over 500 rescues. He lives in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with his wife, Penny, and his sons, Ben and Grant.

Active Interest Media – Video on Fire!

The AIM Equine Network is the largest network of its kind in the equine industry in the United States. AIM reaches more than 1.5 million horse owners across a network of print, digital, and video that includes the brands of American Cowboy, Dressage Today, Equus, EquiManagement, Horse & Rider, Practical Horsemen, Spin to Win Rodeo, and Stable Management magazines, along with A Home for Every Horse, Equisearch, Equine.com, Hope in the Saddle, USRider, and the World Series of Team Roping. This keynote will highlight some of the AIM programs with a fun video presentation. 

Gerrie Barnes

With over 20 years of experience, Gerrie currently lives in Conroe, Texas.  She was designated the 2012 Horseperson of the Year by the Colorado Horse Council and was awarded the 2016 Riding Instructor of the Year by the Certified Horsemanship Association for her teaching, coaching, and mentoring skills. She is an AQHA Professional Horseman and a CHA Certified Instructor. She has a BS in Education and an MA in Counseling.  She has recently written a book and workbook, Riding the Horse’s Mind: The Psychology & Leadership of the Horse. Her current horse business is NewConceptsConsultant.com

Riding the Horse’s Mind: The Psychology & Leadership of the Horse

Riding the Horse’s Mind provides the missing piece to solving the many frustrations that horse owners and riders have with horse problems, trust, and respect. Although Natural Horsemanship provides us an understanding of the horse as a species, many of us don’t understand the level of commitment that horses have to their herd instinct.  Some horses will die over their placement in the herd hierarchy. Explore with me the mind and psychology of the horse. Once seen differently, our human intent, commitment, and approach will be different. Our inter-species communication will greatly improve which will improve the level of trust and respect. Horse problems and our frustrations will improve. Join me on this journey!

Diana Beardsley

Diana has worked at Pegasus Farm Equestrian Center located in Hartivlle, Ohio since 1999. She is a graduate of Lake Erie College with a BS in Equestrian studies. She is a CHA Level 3 English/2 Western/3 IRD Instructor as well as a PATH Registered level riding instructor and Level 1 Driving instructor. Diana has been involved with all of the various equestrian programs that Pegasus offers, but is especially fond of the Veterans Salute Program. She has been involved from the onset of the program in 2007 and has taught unmounted lessons, riding lessons and currently heads the driving lessons for Veterans. 

Working with Veterans in an Equine Program

Dessert Round Tables

Come and join our current CHA Board of Directors for a fun and educational evening. 

Bob Coleman Ph.D., PAS, Dip.ACAN

Bob grew up in western Canada and has had a lifelong interest in horses. He is a graduate of the University of Manitoba with a Bachelors degree in Agriculture with a major in Animal Sciences and a Master’s of Science degree. Bob worked in the Canadian Feed Industry as a nutritionist for two major feed companies and then became the Extension Horse Specialist for Alberta Agriculture. During his time in Alberta, he completed his Ph.D. at the University of Alberta with a focus in Equine Nutrition. In 1998, Bob moved to the University of Kentucky as the Equine Extension Specialist. In addition to his Extension duties, Bob teaches in the Equine Science and Management program, advises undergraduate students and served as the program’s Director of Undergraduate Studies until May 2017. Bob has contributed in the areas of applied research looking at voluntary forage intake of horses and the use of rotational grazing practices to meet maintenance needs of adult horses. In addition he has worked with the extension faculty at the University of Minnesota to develop the Healthy Horse app an app used by horse owners to estimate current body weight as well as ideal body weight. Bob serves as Chairman of the AQHF research committee and is the current past president of the Kentucky Quarter Horse Association. Professionally, Bob is a member of the Equine Science Society and serves as the executive director, is a member of the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists, and is a Diplomat in the American College of Animal Science and the American Society of Animal Scientists. With CHA, Bob is certified as a Lead Site Visitor and Trainer and serves on the CHA board serving as the Vice President for New Initiatives. 

Feeding the Older Horse

Dessert Round Tables

Come and join our current CHA Board of Directors for a fun and educational evening. 

Sarah Evers Conrad

Sarah has been an equestrian journalist for more than 17 years. She is the Editor of CHA’s official publication, The Instructor magazine, in addition to writing CHA’s press releases, blog, and various articles promoting the organization. She has also been published in The Horse magazine, the Arabian Horse Association’s Arabian Horse Life (and the former Modern Arabian Horse), the American Paint Horse Association’s Paint Horse Journal, the United States Dressage Federation’s USDF Connection, Off-Track Thoroughbred, Stable Management, and Blood-Horse magazine. She was the Managing Editor of the United States Equestrian Federation’s Equestrian magazine, U.S. Equestrian’s Director of E-Communications, staff writer for The Horse, and Content Manager and travel writer for a Caribbean travel agency. She currently owns All In Stride Marketing, a digital marketing agency that helps equine business owners promote their products and services.

Working with the Media to Promote Your Business

Showcasing your expertise as a knowledgeable horse person is critical to marketing your services and products, and media exposure is a great way to do this. This session will help attendees learn how to work with the media–including equine media, local media, and mainstream national media. This information is helpful for anyone who wants to promote a business and/or riders and horses at their barn. Attendees will learn how to reach out to media, what types of stories to suggest to the media and how to pitch those stories, and how to form a relationship with the media. Learn how to prep for an interview, how to answer interview questions, mistakes to avoid, how to help the journalist to write the best story possible, and how to promote the article so more readers see it. In addition, this session will also discuss the benefits of using press releases, articles, and other forms of content in your marketing strategy.

Stephanie Cook

Stephanie grew up in New Jersey, riding and teaching students of all ages from the age of 10 until she went to college. After successfully riding for four years on the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) team at West Point, Stephanie graduated in 1987 from the United States Military Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree. She spent time in the military, law enforcement, and corporate careers, raising 5 children and earning an MBA along the way. In 2009, she realized that her passion for horses never left and returned to what she was meant to do; ride and train horses, and teach others how to ride! She opened Hill Country Riding Academy outside of San Antonio, TX where she has had tremendous success with children, adults, young horses, ‘problem’ horses, and everything in-between! In 2015, her horse, Texas Checkmate, won the Take 2 Thoroughbred National Jumper Championship and was also in the top 20 in the Take 2 National Hunter standings. She has trained horses for local and “A” USEF rated shows, has had riders qualify and compete at USEF Pony Finals and coaches the Trinity University IHSA and Hill Country Riding Academy IEA teams. She is an USHJA Certified Trainer and a CHA English and Western certified instructor.

Find Out More About IHSA and IEA

Frank L. Costantini Jr. 

Equine Insurance

Dessert Round Tables

Come and join our current CHA Board of Directors for a fun and educational evening. 

Donovan Dobbs

Donovan is a CHA instructor. He has students from kids and adults with no experience to intermediate level western competitors. One of his specialties is helping adult riders who have lost their confidence riding. He starts colts, works with problem horses and finishes horse for a variety of western competition. He also conducts a variety of clinics around S.W. Missouri. One of his greatest accomplishments has been helping start an annual western day event for foster kids with the charity Cherished Kids. Donovan provides guided horse rides for kids of all ages most who have never been on a horse in their life.

Be A H.E.R.O. to Your Students, Horses and Yourself!

Success is not about winning or accomplishing a specific task but about being a H.E.R.O. This presentation will give your tools and tips on humility, endurance, relationship and obedience (H.E.R.O.) as it applies to you, your students and your horses. We will explore each topic with the hopes that it will make you think and hopefully improves in all aspects of your horsemanship.

Dusty Franklin, CJF, DipWCF, ASF

Dusty has been a full-time farrier since 1992. He grew up riding and competing in youth and amateur divisions and soon began horseshoeing with his father, Jerry, also a CJF. Dusty has operated the Five Star Horseshoeing School in Minco, OK since 1997. He believes in further education through competition, certification, and clinics. A very successful competitor since earning his CJF in 1996, Dusty has twice been on both the American Farriers Team and the World Championship Blacksmith Team. In 2011 he won Stonewell Striker of the Year. Dusty became an AFA Examiner in 2003 and is the Former Chairman of the AFA’s Certification Committee and as an Examiner with the Farrier International Testing System. He and his wife Staci have co-authored the certification study guide “Let’s Get Practical.” An inspiration to others to love their career and not just settle for a job, Dusty has twice been designated the AFA’s Educator of the Year. He also travels internationally as an educator and clinician for Delta Mustad.

Farrier Certification – What It Is and Why It Matters

Since licensing is not required for a person to practice farriery in theUS, the AFA Certification Program was created in 1982 to providevoluntary testing to a consistent standard of hoof care. Three levels constitutethe core of the program : certified farrier, certified tradesman farrier, and certified journeyman farrier. Additional tests are offered in therapeutic shoeing,forging, and educational endorsement. This talk will discuss the requirements of the core program and the standards that must be met to achieve each level of certification. The goal is to provide the audience with a clear overview of the rigorous and comprehensive nature of these tests and how becoming certified impacts the quality of hoof care that a farrier delivers.

Tara Gamble

Tara is Past President of CHA and of the Alberta Equestrian Federation (AEF), as well as Runner-Up Miss Rodeo Canada in 1998. She has served on the Equine Canada Board of Directors as a representative to recreation, and on the Strathcona County Economic Development and Advisory Committee as the agricultural representative. It has been an honor for Tara to receive both the CHA Clinic Instructor of the year (2006), and Volunteer of the year (2013) awards. She is a CHA Clinic Instructor, and a designated Professional Horseman with the American Quarter Horse Association and was appointed to the AQHA Youth Activities Committee in 2012. Her education includes a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture from the University of Alberta. With over twenty three years of industry teaching experience and a background in both Western and English, Tara offers weekly riding lessons at her facility east of Ardrossan, Alberta. In addition, she judges various horsemanship competitions, presents seminars and instructs clinics. She has been fortunate to work with many equine professionals on the provincial, national and international levels which has greatly enriched her experiences.

Lateral Work to Improve Turns on the Haunches, Spins and Rollbacks

Wanting to take your riding to the next level? Are you struggling with how to get there or how you can fine tune more advanced maneuvers? Then you don’t want to miss this session! Lateral exercises are useful for gaining independent control of the forehand and haunches and to aid in a lighter, more willing and responsive horse. Tara will introduce you to several exercises that will help riders and horses build or maintain a solid foundation in order to improve balance, suppleness, impulsion which aid in collection and improvements with turn on the haunches/spins and roll backs.

Jenn Gay

Jenn is a lifetime member to both Girl Scouts and the Certified Horsemanship Association. Jenn started as a Barn Assistant at a Girl Scout Camp and moved all the way up to the Directorship. Jenn has helped create partnerships between local stables and the Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan, and currently teaches the Girl Scout national program to new volunteers. Jenn is the founder of Greenblood.horse and is the current Equestrian Director at Heavenly Horse Stables. Jenn is a CHA certified Instructor and Michigan Representative.

Girl Scouts – Clients that Keep Giving; Daisy, Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior, Ambassador – Badges, Patches, Rewards, Take Action Projects and more! – What do these all mean?

Join us to learn the ins and outs of Girl Scouts and how you can help make the world a better place tomorrow by sharing your knowledge today. Discover how to use your resources wisely and help girls to be responsible for they say and do. Find out how to easily bring a group of first-time riders to your small barn and how to have them keep coming back!

Julie Goodnight

Julie Goodnight is a CHA Master Clinician and the International Spokesperson for CHA and is known for her weekly RFD-TV show Horse Master, and her no-nonsense training for riders of all disciplines. Her methods are grounded in natural horsemanship, classical riding, and understanding horse behavior. She teaches at clinics and expos everywhere and offers online education, how-to DVDs, and her own tack and training tools at JulieGoodnight.com.

For Mature Audiences Only: Teaching the Older Rider

Riders in their 50s, 60s and even 70s are commonplace today and this age group presents different challenges to the riding instructor. This presentation will focus on the special needs of the older rider, including confidence, fitness, motivations and appropriate horse choices.

Shellie Hensley

Co-founder of the H Mill Iron Horsemanship, Shellie Hensley lives in Macksburg, Iowa. Her philosophy of teaching “the total horse from the ground up” based on a foundation of safety, instills confidence in her riders and a distinct connection with the horse. Shellie currently serves CHA on the Board of Directors, as Clinic Staff and a Site Visitor. Even with her busy schedule, she enjoys working alongside her husband, Randy, a certified farrier, rehabilitating horses. Their small acreage serves as a happy home to several critters.

Creative Exercises to Develop A Thinking Rider From the Beginning

We have all seen it – most of us are doing it – getting stuck in a rut with our beginner riders; where the “Follow the Leader” method sets in and keeps horses and riders following, but not necessarily thinking! Join Shellie Hensley as she explores creative ways to safely pull riders and their instructors out of the rut and onto the path of thinking and responding during lessons. Bring an open mind and your sense of humor as Shellie walks riders through the Good, the Not-So-Good and the greatness of thinking outside the box.

Melissa (Missy) Howard

Growing up on a small Ohio farm instilled the love of horses for Missy at a young age. She graduated from Hocking College with a degree in Backcountry Horsemanship, Wildlife Management and a certificate from the National Ranger Training Institute. After pursuing many jobs in small boarding barns and a brief stent at a Standardbred training facility she moved to Kentucky and was one of the first women hired at Claiborne Farm. She worked with world champion thoroughbred racehorses in the foaling barn, breaking yearlings, mares & foals and doing sales. Claiborne Farm opened the door for her to travel to New Zealand for a year working at Fayette Park Stud. Next she was led to the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation (TRF) back in KY. TRF was spreading across the US establishing retirement farms for ex-racehorses at minimum security prisons. Missy did many things at TRF including national retirement and transportation coordinator, liaison of race tracks across the US, worked directly with the prison systems to establish equine retirement programs, and developed a horse-based curriculum for inmates. She was then hired as the Volunteer Coordinator for Pegasus Farms in Ohio managing over 150 active volunteers, assisting in many fundraising activities, orchestrating tours and other Farm events. Missy has gone on to become a certified CHA riding instructor teaching Youth at Risk programs both mounted, unmounted and drill teams. She is one of the instructors working with the Pegasus Farm’s Veteran Salute program participants. Married to Roger Howard, an a AFA Certified Journeyman Farrier, and having two horse crazy kids Mallory & Grant keeps her surrounded by horses at home and at work. 

Working with Veterans in an Equine Program

Dessert Round Tables

Come and join our current CHA Board of Directors for a fun and educational evening. 

Becky Huddleston

Becky Huddleston is the owner and trainer/coach at Tightfit Stables in Baxter, Tennessee. She started riding as a child on her family farm and in high school began showing TN walking horses and barrel racing Quarter Horses and Appaloosas. She graduated from Tennessee Tech University with a B.S. Degree in Agriculture in 2000 where she also competed in the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association. While in college, Becky started riding colts and breeding Quarter Horses. After graduation, she began to teach lessons and coaching the Equestrian Team at Tennessee Tech. In 2003, Becky and her husband built a barn and started teaching and training full time. In addition to IHSA, Becky’s students participate in the Interscholastic Equestrian Association, 4H and open schooling shows. Becky currently serves on the board of directors for the IHSA and judges schooling and 4H shows. Her main focus in her lesson program is proper horsemanship and equitation.

Exercises to Improve Flexibility, Strength, Coordination of the Aids

Come to this session to learn different rider exercises that will increase rider strength, flexibility and coordination of aids. A few examples of these are “toe touches”, “double posting”, and “hip flexor stretches”. Some exercises are geared toward improving common rider faults such as keeping riders heels down (wearing spurs on the riders’ toes), keeping hands still (carrying a golf ball in a spoon), sitting the trot (raising a hand up over the head) and many others. I feel that many instructors could benefit from having multiple simple and fun exercises to add to their programs. You can use these exercises as warm ups and cool downs as well as for correcting those common rider faults.

Karen Jackson

Karen is a Saddlefit for Life certified saddle ergonomist. Her passion for horses started at a young age, volunteering at a race horse farm, helping to care for and exercise the horses. Since her start there, she has spent time in the Ontario hunter/jumper circuits, worked with plow horse teams on an organic farm, managed a trail riding facility at a resort, and trained and coached jumpers in Mexico City. She has loved becoming a saddle ergonomist that has made her realize how many situations in her past horse experiences with horses could have been prevented with a simple saddle fit evaluation. Instead of dwelling on past mistakes, she has committed her life to teaching others the importance of a properly fitted saddle, and checking the fit regularly as the horse grows and changes. Karen lives near Newmarket, Ontario with her Arabian mare, Tess; her best friend and companion for well over 20 years.

Saddle Fit: Anatomical Considerations of Both Horse and Rider 

When looking for a saddle, there are so many more factors to consider other than discipline and seat size. In the past thirty years, horseback riding has seen a huge shift in rider demographics. Also, horse breeding trends have brought about a different body type in our sport horses. We cannot expect so many changes in the sport, and not make any changes to the equipment we rely on. This talk will focus on these changes and what they mean to saddle fit. We will examine the anatomical differences between female and male riders, and what they need to accommodate these differences when riding. We will also look in depth at equine anatomy and how to best fit a saddle in order to avoid interfering with a horse’s movement. This talk will give listeners a good place to start evaluating their own saddle, and where to go from there.

Dr. Kathi Jogan

Kathi is a long time equine industry professional who has managed, trained, and shown various horse breeds representing multiple disciplines. Currently on the faculty at the University of Arkansas, Kathi offers courses in equine science and engages students in internships in the U.S. and abroad. She has directed many fundraising and experiential events to promote her University’s Animal Science Department. Kathi is a member of the Equine Science Society, the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists, the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture and the CHA Board of Directors. 

Low Cost and High Impact Strategies for Increasing Group Engagement

Everyone who is involved in the equine industry has three over-arching goals – safety, best practices in horse care and minimizing expenses. At first glance, it seems like these goals are mutually exclusive, but in fact, CHA is the key that can unlock how to make these goals seamlessly mesh. As a long-time equine industry professional, event coordinator, fundraiser, riding instructor, university instructor and farm manager, Kathi will give you proven strategies incorporating CHA that will ensure that as a horse professional, you are a success using all of the matrices….and that engagement and volunteerism in your horse barns, at your equine fundraisers, and in your riding classes will be at an all-time high!

 

Laura Kelland-May

Laura is very active in the horse industry and is a USEF “R” Judge (Hunter, Jumper and Equitation) as well as Equestrian Canada “S” Judge (Hunter, Jumper, Equitation and Hack) and Senior Steward. She continues to develop horses and riders and is the founder of “Equestrian Skill Builders series of Horse Show Clinics” and is moderator of the monthly Jumping Instructors Webinar and Dressage Instructors Webinar. In addition she is a freelance coach, working with horse professionals incorporating many breeds and disciplines. Contact Laura today for more information on how you an transform your coaching, riding, and training skills Laura@ThistleRidgeStables.com.

Top Tips on What the Judge Expects to See in Your Students’ Hunter Classes

Have you ever wondered what the judge is looking for? Winning rounds are more than counting strides and getting your leads! Laura brings her experience judging at horse shows, from local “in house” training shows to national/international competitions and shares with coaches, trainers and competitors, what the judge is looking for. Attendees will be asked to ride a simple hunter course. Laura will outline the must haves for a winning round, what can detract from your winning round and will also provide easy step by step exercises you can use to improve your riders and their horses. From the approach to your first fence to the exit of the competition ring, Laura educates instructors and coaches on how to transform their clients into winning competitors. 

Melissa King

Melissa grew up competing in Hunter/Jumpers in Houston, Texas, while always harboring the dream of becoming a jockey. From there, she went on to get her B.S. in Equine Sports Therapy from Midway College in 2005. During college, she competed on the Intercollegiate riding team until she found her way to the racetrack. Melissa began galloping racehorses in 2002 and upon completion of her degree program, proceeded to travel the racing circuit around the US.Melissa decided she was better suited nurturing the horse’s progress in their daily training rather than riding them in races. She was fortunate to ride for some of the top trainers and farms in the country, also becoming familiar with managing and rehabilitating injuries while practicing sports therapy. Now she has transitioned from the gypsy lifestyle of the racetrack and has settled in Kentucky, where she has begun helping the horses at New Vocations make the same transition in to their new lives. Melissa purchased her appendix mare, Sierra, in 1996 as a green broke 2 year old and they are still together 21 years later. They progressed from baby green to low junior hunters before heading off to college together. Once Melissa began galloping racehorses, Sierra became a pleasure horse and traveled the country with Melissa, occasionally “earning her keep” as one of the few mares to pony racehorses on the track. One of whom was Lava Man, earner of $5.35 million in his career. Now, she is still living the good life here in Kentucky, trail riding and occasionally foxhunting.

Lunch – The Off the Track Thoroughbred – What Can Be Next?  Melissa King and Susanna Thomas – New Vocations & Makers Mark Secretariat Center – KHP Covered Arena

Melissa Kitchen

Melissa is the Director of Digital Media for the AIM Equine Network. She helps both clients and industry partners with their digital strategies. She has been with the Equine Network for five years, previously being with two B2B magazine publishers, UBM–Canon and Penton Media. Kitchen has also worked at the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association as their webmaster after she graduated from Colorado State University with a degree in Equine Science. She grew up on a dairy farm in southern Wisconsin and moved to Colorado for college. Melissa and her husband live in Northern Colorado with their three sons who are active with horses and showing lambs. 

Active Interest Media – Videos on Fire!

The AIM Equine Network is the largest network of its kind in the equine industry in the United States. AIM reaches more than 1.5 million horse owners across a network of print, digital, and video that includes the brands of American Cowboy, Dressage Today, Equus, EquiManagement, Horse & Rider, Practical Horsemen, Spin to Win Rodeo, and Stable Management magazines, along with A Home for Every Horse, Equisearch, Equine.com, Hope in the Saddle, USRider, and the World Series of Team Roping. This keynote will highlight some of the AIM programs with a fun video presentation. 

Lisa Lombardi

Lisa has been a professional riding instructor since 1989, when she worked as a wrangler at a large summer camp that included a campers’ drill team performance every 2 weeks. Lisa’s personal, professional and competition experience has included reining, jumping, dressage, trail riding and horse camping, mounted color guard, mounted assistance unit, AQHA, and ApHC. Over the years she had the privilege of working directly with and alongside Pam Prudler, one of the original CHA founders, Mike Boyle, then president of NRHA, Diana Thompson, equine acupressure expert and author of Acupressure Point Charts for Horses, and many others. Lisa earned a BA in English with an emphasis in education. She also enjoys writing educational articles on current equine issues for the Sonoma County Horse Journal. Lisa has been CHA certified since 1990, and is currently clinic staff as well as a site evaluator. As a riding instructor, Lisa teaches lessons on her own 9 horses, as well as on clients’ horses. Lisa is the riding instructor for an after school and summer camp program. Lisa puts on monthly play days, and her students participate in local dressage and jumping shows. Since 1990, Lisa has taught hands-on equine science courses at Santa Rosa Junior College. Lisa is also PATH certified and CIEP-ED certified.

Drill Patterns for All Levels of Riders

Are you looking for a creative new approach to help your students practice and advance skills? Riding is often considered an individual activity, but working together as part of a drill team will engage your students in a fun and interactive manner. Drill team skills include lengthening and shortening stride, keeping horses’ attention, awareness of other riders, precision of turns and transitions. An even greater advantage is that riders can work on all of these skills without even realizing it, and have fun doing it! Come join us as we create a mini drill performance during this session.  

Sheryl Mankel

Sheryl has been a registered instructor for PATH International since 2000 and a PATH Intl. Equine Certified Specialist since 2009, specializing in helping veterans. In 2005, she became a CHA Certified Instructor. In 2010, she furthered her education and became a Nationally Certified Equine Acupressure Practitioner. You can find out more at www.connected-healing.com.

Help Your Horse with Acupressure and Essential Oils

We will identify points you might have already been taught but did not realize the association a particular area has with the attitude and healing throughout the rest of the horse. Such points are at the poll, front of the shoulder blade, withers, coronary band, chest, to name a few. Five branches of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Nutrition, Herbal, Acupressure/Moxibustion, Tui Na (massage) and Qi gong (movement) will be discussed. There will be information shared on essential oils and horses as well.

Bailey McCallum

Bailey is a lifelong equestrian, born and raised in Iowa, and grew up on stock-type horses. She switched to dressage when she started undergrad at William Woods University and continued to ride dressage through the FEI levels as well as teach dressage and western lessons. She has a BS in Equine Science with a concentration in dressage, as well as an M.Ed. in Equestrian Education, both from William Woods. Bailey currently lives in Georgetown, KY and works for the American Association of Equine Practitioners which is located in the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. She has a 12-year-old Quarter Horse mare who teaches lessons to all ages and abilities and I keep a few client horses in training to fill up my “spare time”. 

Equine Disease Communication Center

The Equine Disease Communication Center was established as part of a larger National Equine Health Plan with the aim to mitigate the effects of infectious and vector borne diseases in North America. The EDCC provides real-time, accurate alerts on disease outbreaks as well as educational materials for both vets and horse owners on domestic and foreign diseases, vaccination guidelines, biosecurity protocols and provides contact information for state animal health officials. Trainers and instructors play an integral part in preventing the spread of disease in the equine industry and can benefit from an awareness of the tools made available by the EDCC.

Jessica Mohr

Equine enthusiasts understand the hard work and dedication it takes to stay in this industry and Jessica’s story is no different. In the past 26 years CHA has played a vital role in her life from providing her with mentors to an education with a solid foundation. In the meantime she has managed and nurtured large horse programs, continues coaching people of all ages, and is pursuing her dream of riding dressage in an internationally recognized competition. She realizes that it’s important to remain a student, take risks, lean in, and show up to be an equestrian athlete, but at the end of the day it’s people that matter most and it’s through the partnership of the horse that we get beautiful relationships with people.

Leg Yields, Circles, Half Pass, Serpentines and Shoulder In

Do schooling figures and correctness sound mundane & possibly difficult to teach in a group setting? Come discover the benefits of these things, how to incorporate them into your lessons, making it fun for both horse & rider. This class will combine the art of learning about each manuever as well as some safe exercises to help you use them in your lessons at home. 

Ken Najorka

Many wet saddle pads and miles of riding later, Ken focuses on helping the rider communicate better with his/her horse. “I do have many awards, but the greatest accomplishment is when I see someone better understand his horse and that leads to just a happier team,” Ken observed. Ken uses a natural horseman approach because common sense wins over pressuring a horse to perform. With over 30 years of experience, he is a CHA instructor and Regional Director. In addition, Ken is an AQHA and NRHA Professional Horseman. Ken has taught every level of rider, including serving as the coach for the University of Central Florida Western Team.

Western Dressage 

Western Dressage is not as scary as it sounds and is a great sport for all levels of riders. It involves exercises for the everyday rider that will improve the rider and horse team, No matter your age young or younger at heart.

Beth Powers

CHA Annual Membership Meeting

Come and learn what your association is doing and how you can become even more actively involved. A full Poll Everywhere will also be done. 

 

Dale Rudin

Dale is a CHA certified riding instructor, trainer and clinician. She is the founder of Unnatural Horsemanship – a mindful approach to the horse-human relationship. Dale is also a founding member of Force-Free Tennessee, an organization of positive animal training professionals that promotes humane low-stress animal training and handling. Her articles have been published in Young Rider, Horse Illustrated, and on HorseChannel.com. She works as an instructor and trainer and Tennessee. She works with all breeds of horses in every discipline using force-free and fear-free techniques. Dale’s whole-horse approach to training follows the science of equine learning and behavior and horse/rider biomechanics. Her goal is to create emotionally stable, balanced, and happy horses. Dale offers training, rehabilitation, and instruction in equine behavior, management, and riding technique in middle Tennessee and at her farm, Lyric Valley Ranch, in Santa Fe, Tennessee. UnnaturalHorsemanship.com

The Mind Body Connection

As we teach technique, it’s also important that our students understand how their choices in the saddle affect their horse’s emotional state. This is important for the horse’s well-being and vital for a rider’s safety. An aggravated horse can become dangerous. Learning how to visualize or feel a shift from relaxed to reactive is an essential horsemanship tool. However, prevention is the ultimate skill. I will share how a rider can recognize changes in their horse’s state of mind (both desirable and undesirable) and how to return a horse to a calm state should he become aroused. 

Larissa Strappello

Larissa is the Facility Manager and an Instructor at Houghton College Equestrian Program. She teaches college equestrian classes, trains horses and manages the running of the barn, shows and events. Larissa is a CHA certified Master Instructor and Assistant clinic instructor for Standard and Equine Facility Management clinics. She also has her Master’s degree in Equestrian Education and is fully commitment to promoting effective and safe equine instruction. Larissa truly enjoys helping others learn about the amazing equine partners that help her do her job!”

Exercises for Horse and Rider Using Dressage Training Principles  

Connecting the classical dressage training scale of rhythm, relaxation, connection, impulsion, straightness and collection to your students of all levels and lesson horses through exercises that can help both horse and rider.

Cathy Thacker

Cathy is the Equine Program Specialist for Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont and manages all of the programing, horses and facilities at Circle C Equestrian Center. She is a CHA and PATH Intl certified Riding Instructor and graduated from Averett University with a B.S. in Equine Studies and Business. Horseless, but at a wonderful lesson barn, Cathy grew up in the NC 4-H Horse Program and wore out her family, Girl Scout troop and teachers by trying to make every vacation, badge or school assignment horse themed. Today she has three horses of her own and works for this generation’s Barn Rats to help facilitate all of their horse dreams.

Adding Horseback Archery To Your Riding Program

It’s easier and safer than you might think! This session will explore the “new” ancient sport of Horseback Archery and its growing popularity in the US. We will discuss the potential benefits Horseback Archery could add to your existing horse programs including the benefits for the horses and students. We will try to demystify, equipment, horse selection and training and the safety considerations to take into account along with giving participants access to resources to help in establishing their own programs.

Susanna Thomas

Susann has a lifetime of experience in horsemanship, journalism and civic work. Raised in New York and Europe, Susanna has a degree from Princeton University in Comparative Literature. She worked at Random House Publishers and has a career spanning nearly three decades as an equine journalist writing for publications such as Equus, The Horse Journal, Spur, The Thoroughbred Times, and The Blood Horse, to name a few. She has worked in editorial capacities for EAGALA in Practice, The Horse Journal, and Bluegrass Magazine. She has been deeply involved at the state level in such civic issues as farmland preservation and context sensitive traffic design. A lifelong horsewoman, she has taught riding, competed in dressage and hunt seat, and tried many equestrian disciplines from foxhunting to carriage driving and riding sidesaddle. She developed the Horse Centered Reschooling Program® and applies this holistic interdisciplinary system to every horse at the MMSC. She and her husband live on a farm in Mercer County.

Lunch – The Off the Track Thoroughbred – What Can Be Next?  Melissa King and Susanna Thomas – New Vocations & Makers Mark Secretariat Center – KHP Covered Arena

Randi Thompson

Randi is the CEO of the “Horse and Rider Awareness Educational Programs,” which include, “How to Market Your Horse Business,” “Jumping Instructors,” “Dressage Instructors,” and “Movers and Shakers of the Horse World.” She has been coaching professionals in the horse industry for over 25 years in horse and rider training, business, and marketing. Randi has worked with many breeds of horses and styles of riding in her career and has produced national winners in the worlds of dressage, hunter/jumper, western pleasure and flat shod Walking Horses. Randi is a CHA Master Instructor and Clinician and is available to come to your location for clinics and instructor training. For more information on how Randi can make a difference for you, go to http://www.horseandriderawareness.com.

Protecting Your Horse Business with Risk Management

We all love what we are doing as riding instructors. However, what we do is more than just living our dreams. We also need to operate a horse business. Now you can discover what you need to know to protect yourself and your clients as much as possible. Are you ready to step up to the next level of success with your horse business? If so, you do not want to miss this.  

Jen Verharen

Jen is a professional performance and business coach. She is a USDF Certified Instructor, USDF “L” judge’s program graduate with distinction, USDF bronze & silver medalist, USPC graduate A and USPC National Examiner. Jen has competed and trained at the upper levels in both dressage and eventing. She has a BA in Organizational Psychology/ Mental Health and is a certified Health and Wellness Coach, Transformational Life Coach and mediator. She was a corporate leadership and business coach for several years and now brings that experience to her work with equestrians. Her business, Cadence Coaching, specializes in providing performance and business coaching for equestrians. Jen conducts workshops with riders and horse industry professionals all around the US. She was a keynote speaker at the United Sates Dressage Federation Convention in 2015 and 2016. Already in 2017, she has presented seminars at the Area VII USEA Annual Meeting and the American Arabian Horse Association Northwest EquestFest. She is passionate about helping horse industry professionals build thriving businesses and helping riders find joy and success both in and out of the saddle. 

Peak Performance Strategy Workshop

Learn simple strategies for handling stress constructively and riding your best even under pressure! High performance is the result of intentional action, mental toughness, healthy routines and the ability to not only manage but also capitalize on powerful emotions. This workshop is designed to help you leverage fear, shift your thinking and learn powerful tools for getting into “the zone” so that you can perform optimally both in the saddle and out. 

Cheryl West

Cheryl, a Master Certified Horsemanship Instructor and Clinician for English, Western, Therapeutic and Jumping, and a PATH Therapeutic Instructor and Mentor, travels nationally teaching The Connected Ride to all disciplines and developing instructors. She owns and operates West Equestrian Ranch in Sand Springs Oklahoma, teaching lessons to over 60+ riders a week at her ranch as well as teaching at on Saturdays through the region. She often travels certifying instructors, mentoring and teaching clinics. She was the program manager for American Therapeutic Center, with 70+ riders, for 5 years. Encourages riders and people from all walks of life that upper level equitation can be achieved no matter what discipline, horse or income. Cheryl has organized and managed several shows, events, and been a part of many boards, served as president and helped in various organizations. Cheryl is passionate about CHA, all types of dressage, and using bio-mechanics, rhythm and feel to understand the horses language.

Canter Transitions

Working for prompt, obedient canter departs on the correct lead at the correct moment. working to use successive aids to ask for a simple lead, simple change of lead or even flying without throwing the horse off balance. Its important to set the horse up for success, and to build the horse up for a correct lead or lead change.

Jennifer Willey

Jennifer has worked in marketing, licensing and business development for agencies, Target, Best Buy and United Heath Care and enjoys transferring her skillset into the horse industry. She has a Bachelor of Science in Business Marketing degree from the University of Minnesota, Curtis L. Carlson School of Management and is a CHA Standard Clinic Instructor and Region 3 Director. Raised in MN, Jennifer got her start in horses at a young age, taking hunt seat lessons and going to horse camp in the summer. In middle school she began working as barn help in exchange for lessons with a reining trainer and later a dressage trainer. She went on to be a working student for an Arabian breeder and trainer and also worked as a trail guide in the summer. Jennifer has experience in both seats, exercising/loping, trail guiding, catch riding, training, colt starting and teaching English and Western equitation. Jennifer has held roles including riding program director, resident trainer/instructor, horse buyer, barn manager and subject matter expert in publishing, video production and editing. Jennifer was CHA’s Instructor of the Year in 2007. She served two terms on the Minnesota Horse Council and as the committee chairperson for the Promotions and Education committees. She formed and developed the MHC’s Sponsorship program, the Horse of the Year program, the social media pages and online membership process and renewal. Jennifer’s WHY Statement: I educate for the purpose of creating good horse people that will do good things for horses. 

The Care and Training of Clients

Are your client crazy? Do you dream of having more clients and every year for your birthday ask for a new client? This is the session for you! We’ll talk about how to find clients and how to determine the right clients for you. Why all clients are different and yet also the same. How to keep them coming back to you and how to keep them happy in their training. 

Mitzi Summers

Mitzi has been devoted to the welfare and safety of horses and their people for most of her life. The recipient of the CHA Instructor of the Year Award, Mitzi is also one of less than thirty Level IV Centered Riding Instructors in the world. Through her achievement of CHA Master Instructor and Clinician, and a Centered Riding Clinician, Mitzi has certified or updated hundreds of instructors so far in her career. She has taught and trained in many countries, including South Africa, New Zealand, and throughout Europe. She has performed with the Royal Lippizan Stallion Tour. Mitzi specializes in working in a very individualized basis with riders and their horses, teaching them to train their own horses in a non-abusive way. She is truly multi-talented, working with a rider in Ireland short-listed for the Olympics, to a rider who has fear issues and is afraid to trot. Horses who have been confused or traumatized are her specialty. Three of her mentors were Charles Grant, Vi Hopkins, and Sally Swift, all recipients of the USDF Hall of Fame Award. Mitzi will be interested in helping you and your horse no matter what level or discipline, she truly “Teaches the Beauty of Horses”.

 

Biomechanics in Riding, Riding the Horse, Not the Discipline 

There are as many schools of thought about riding and riding techniques, as there are styles of saddles. Any technique can offer some results if applied intelligently, but what about the simple biomechanics of movement? When we were kids, sitting bareback on a horse would have been second nature. As we grow up, and develop into a style of riding, many of us end up feel like no matter how hard we try, we are missing something. Biomechanics puts you back in touch with your innate sense of being with a horse, not a discipline of riding. The techniques of Bio-mechanics are not so much about rein and leg, as about re-discovering your body’s own wisdom in relationship to the horse’s movements. Once a rider has been liberated with this work, they usually find that their chosen riding style becomes fluid, easy and much more enjoyable. 

JoAnne Young

JoAnne has been teaching riding and training horses for over 40 years, and is happy that she is still learning. Every student and every horse bring fresh challenges that keep life interesting. She has been privileged and blessed beyond her wildest dreams to study with such wonderful instructors as Walter Zettl (dressage coach to Canadian event team when they won bronze at Los Angeles Olympics), Bertin Potter in Germany, Molly Sivewright (FEI judge and past chair of the Fellows of the British Horse Society), Carel Eijkenaar (FEI judge), Eddo Hoestra (F.E.I. Trainer) and Doris Halstead (Physical Therapist and author of Releasing the Potential: Physical Therapy Modalities for Horse and Rider.) Jo-Anne is the author of the M.A. thesis: “Preparing students for riding instructor certification through college curricula.”

Engaging the Rider’s Core to Engage the Horse’s Core

A series of exercises and position adjustments and the use of a fairly new training tool to help the rider develop that “dancing on air” feeling that comes from true balance and accurately timed and placed aids. 

2016 CHA International Conference Speakers

Peggy Adams

CHA President Peggy Adams has been on the CHA board for nine years and is a CHA Clinician. She previously taught and coached riding at her own farm, PLA HorsePlay, and worked for the Girl Scouts for 30 years in a variety of managerial positions.

CHA Annual Meeting – Holiday Inn – 2 p.m.

 

 

Tim Alderson

Tim isn’t from Texas, but he got there as fast as he could! Originally from Orange County, California, Tim’s equine enthusiasm eventually landed him in East Texas at Pine Cove Christian Camps, where he has served as the Head Wrangler for over 30 years. At Pine Cove, Tim oversees all aspects of 4 separate riding programs encompassing 120 horses and dozens of wranglers. A member of CHA since 1985, Tim is certified in English and Western, has served on the Board of Directors, hosted a CHA National Clinic and Conference, and was a recipient of CHA’s Volunteer of the Year award in 2009.

That’s a Great Idea! – Sharing tips, tricks and problem solving ideas – MTSU Teaching Arena – Saturday, 9 a.m.

Have you had to adapt your program because of your facilities (or lack thereof), your neighbors, your budget, staff, etc.? This session is designed to encourage participation—sharing tips and ideas in order to troubleshoot problems and enhance your program’s effectiveness. Tim has plenty of ideas, but wants to invite anyone to share the “how and whys” of what works for you. We will be using real horses and equipment, so bring your questions and ideas and let’s all learn from one another!

 

Kim Brown

Kim has more than 35 years of experience equine industry publishing and marketing. Currently she is the Associate Publisher/Editor of two brands for Active Interest Media (AIM) that are focused on business. EquiManagement is for equine veterinarians and Stable Management is for farm/stable owners and riding instructors. Kim’s background includes nearly 30 years at Blood-Horse Publications, the first 15 with The Blood-Horse magazine, ending up as a Contributing Editor, and the second 15 developing The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care as the Publisher/Editor. Kim retired from publishing to become Global Marketing Manager at Kentucky Equine Research, and while there lead the team that created award-winning newsletters and videos, launched a new content-driven educational website, and developed an e-commerce site. Kim then ran her own marketing/content development company for a short time before accepting a full-time position with AIM’s Equine Network. Kim and her musician husband, Ben, moved from Kentucky to Wyoming and are enjoying the outdoor life riding horses, camping, cycling, hiking, fishing, canoeing, and Kim’s favorite—rockhounding. Kim can be reached at KBrown@THINInc.com.

Luck is Where Preparation Meets Opportunity – Keynote – Thursday – 3 p.m.

Do you want more students? Do you want to teach at more facilities (or a specific facility) and just can’t seem to break the ice? Do you want to start camps or expand the ones you have but need a partner to make it happen? Then you need to learn how to recognize and take advantage of opportunities you might not even see that are in front of you today!

 

Anne Brzezicki

As the MTSU Director of the Equestrian Program, Brzezicki is the director of equine laboratory classes, and she coaches the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) team at the Murfreesboro, TN, university. Brzezicki got her start as a hunt seat rider in Connecticut. As a second-year undergraduate at the University of Connecticut, she and the UConn Equestrian Team won the IHSA National Championship. She then coached the UConn Equestrian Team to the National Hunt Seat Championship in 1972. In addition to competing for IHSA, Brzezicki has competed in USEF and AQHA shows. She began the MTSU Equestrian Team in 1977, and she and Kenny Copenhaver introduced the western  horsemanship divisions to IHSA that year. She would start another IHSA team, this time at Virginia Tech. She served a brief stint as Virginia Tech’s IHSA coach while she attended graduate school there, but she returned to coaching at MTSU in the 1980s. Over the years, Brzezicki has coached many youth, amateur, and IHSA national champions. In addition, her background also includes teaching at 4-H horse camps in Connecticut and Tennessee. In addition, Brzezicki has been an active member of the IHSA Board of Directors, AQHA, and a big supporter of 4-H. She was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from IHSA in 2003 and IHSA Regional Coach of the Year in 2004. Brzezicki is a CHA Master Instructor and as a CHA Assistant Clinic Instructor, she has recently begun hosting CHA Certification Clinics and thoroughly enjoys working with other teachers in an atmosphere of shared enthusiasm, knowledge, and techniques. In addition, she was honored by CHA when she was awarded the 2015 CHA Instructor of the Year Award.

Real Colors Personality Style Assessment for You, Your Students and Your Horses – Thursday – 5:30 – Holiday Inn

For just $20 come and take the Real Colors Personality test to see if you are Gold, Green, Blue, Orange or a combination of colors. This instrument can be helpful working with students, your family and friends and even your horses. Come and find out how and take the instrument home with you.

Jumping Exercises for Different Levels – MTSU Teaching Arena – Friday, 10:30 a.m.

 

Stephanie Cook

Stephanie grew up in New Jersey, riding and teaching students of all ages from the age of 10 until she went to college. After successfully riding for four years on the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) team at West Point, Stephanie graduated in 1987 from the United States Military Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree. She spent time in the military, law enforcement, and corporate careers, raising 5 children and earning an MBA along the way. In 2009, she realized that her passion for horses never left and returned to what she was meant to do; ride and train horses, and teach others how to ride! She opened Hill Country Riding Academy outside of San Antonio, TX where she has had tremendous success with children, adults, young horses, ‘problem’ horses, and everything in-between! In 2015, her horse, Texas Checkmate, won the Take 2 Thoroughbred National Jumper Championship and was also in the top 20 in the Take 2 National Hunter standings. She has trained horses for local and “A” USEF rated shows, has had riders qualify and compete at USEF Pony Finals and coaches the Trinity University IHSA and Hill Country Riding Academy IEA teams. She is an USHJA Certified Trainer and a CHA English and Western certified instructor.

The Different Jumping Releases – MTSU Teaching Arena – Friday, 9 – 10:15

Grab the mane? Crest Release? Following Arm? So many choices! Come to this session to learn what Stephanie has heard from top trainers such as Olympians George Morris, Anne Kursinski, Greg Best, Joe Meyer and Bernie Traurig over the past two years trying to develop the most effective, kind, and consistent way for riders to place their arms and hands over fences. There are times when “grabbing the mane” is certainly the best approach, however, this should not be the position as the rider develops a more secure core and true independence of seat, arms, and legs. “Wide hands”, driving reins, counting and gymnastics in the half seat, or two-point position, will be used to help riders develop a feel for balance, rhythm and following the horse’s mouth over the top of the fences in order to maintain constant contact. With whom, when, and how to practice techniques to develop the “following arm” (also known as the “automatic release”) will be outlined and discussed in depth.

 

David Dellin

David Dellin is the APHA Director of Judges. He is a multiple World and Congress champion trainer. He has judged multiple NSBA futurities and breed World Championship shows. He currently resides in Elmore City, OK, with his wife, Julie, and three children Gage, Lane, and McKenna.

HorseIQ – Miller Club – Saturday, 1:30 p.m.

Prepare yourself for a one of a kind experience, giving you the same information that carded judges hear in their educational seminars. From cutting-edge video examples with easy to see graphics, to in-depth explanations of the science behind scoring systems and maneuver scores, this website has you covered. Judge runs in the “Judging Test of Knowledge” and compare your scores to the expert panel in each discipline. You also will have the ability to judge entire classes and compare your scores against the World Show judges that judged the classes live. Whether you are an exhibitor, professional or carded judge this is the place to hone your skills and gain the knowledge to be a success in the show pen.

 

Sandra Elder

Sandra is a CHA instructor and a Special Education teacher by trade, and a teacher of any child who wants to ride by passion. The thousands of children who have ridden through her lesson program are testament to how much difference one person can make in the lives of others.  Her son John was an AQHYA national officer and daughter Sarah member of the AQHA Youth World Cup Team.  They both have been World and Congress winners. Sandra’s service includes more than 38 years of being a 4-H Horse Project leader, 6 years of serving TN youth as TQHA Youth Director, and starting the very first IEA team in TN years, both hunter seat and western.  Her students have won major awards at the TN State 4-H Horse Judging Contest, Public Speaking, Hippology, Horse Bowl and Demonstration Contests, TN State 4-H Horse Show, Southern Regional 4-H Horse Show, AQHA Youth World, and IEA Nationals.  Her creative programs and selfless hours spent in the service of youth have helped her and husband Roger and their family earn the TN State 4-H Family award.  Sandra has been honored with the AQHA Youth Leader of the Year Award, TQHA President’s Award, MTSU and UT Service awards and Maryville District Teacher of the Year as well as numerous other recognitions.

Exercises for Multiple Students at Different Levels – Miller Coliseum – Friday, 3 p.m.

When scheduling students for riding lessons, the ideal would be “like ability and like age” to ride together, but with busy families and multiple activities this can be impossible.  An instructor must be able to plan lesson content that can be adapted for all abilities or skill levels, hunter or western, male or female, adult or child. This session will give you many exercises to take home and start teaching!

 

Tammi Gainer

Having grown up around horses, Tammi began her professional equestrian career in 1989 as a trail guide at a large ranch camp where she was first introduced to CHA and attended a Standard Instructor Certification Clinic in 1990. In the spring of 1995, Tammi joined the instructor staff at Pegasus Farm Therapeutic Equestrian Center in Hartville, OH.  While working at the Farm part-time and  home schooling her three children, Tammi also spent much time working under several national trainers in both reining and dressage and achieved, in addition to her CHA Instructor certification, PATH Intl. instructor certification.  In 2000, she achieved CHA Master Level Instructor and Standard clinic staff status and has since earned Clinic Instructor status in the IRD and Vaulting Coach programs as well. Tammi was promoted to Equestrian Director at Pegasus in 2005 where she now manages all aspects of the equestrian program that serves 250 plus students each week participating in areas such as horsemanship, riding, driving, vaulting, veterans, and youth-at-risk programs.  Most recently Tammi has acquired her AQHA Professional Horseman status; an organization she is especially proud to be a part of.  In September 2007 Tammi was elected to the CHA Board of Directors and asked to chair the Education & Training Committee & in 2011 was asked to take on the position of Board Secretary.  In the fall of 2014, Tammi accepted the responsibility of board treasurer. At the 2011 Certified Horsemanship Association International Conference in Lexington, KY. Tammi was honored with the coveted “CHA Volunteer of the Year Award.”

How to Deal with Different Types of Clientele – Miller Club– Friday, 9 a.m.

 

Tara Gamble

Tara has been the Past President of CHA and of the Alberta Equestrian Federation (AEF), as well as Runner-Up Miss Rodeo Canada in 1998. She has served on the Equine Canada Board of Directors as a representative to recreation, and on the Strathcona County Economic Development and Advisory Committee as the agricultural representative. It has been an honor for Tara to receive both the CHA Clinic Instructor of the year (2006), and Volunteer of the year (2013) awards. She is a CHA Clinic Instructor, and a designated Professional Horseman with the American Quarter Horse Association and was appointed to the AQHA Youth Activities Committee in 2012. Her education includes a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture from the University of Alberta. With over twenty three years of industry teaching experience and a background in both Western and English, Tara offers weekly riding lessons at her facility east of Ardrossan, Alberta. In addition, she judges various horsemanship competitions, presents seminars and instructs clinics. She has been fortunate to work with many equine professionals on the provincial, national and international levels which has greatly enriched her experiences.

Practical Applications for the Turn Back – Miller Coliseum – Friday, 9 a.m.

This session will explore how turn backs can help take your riding to the next level! An often overlooked or misunderstood maneuver, the turn back is a fundamental training exercise that can assist your horse in learning to use their hind end better to improve lightness and balance. Discover what a turn back is including variations of the traditional pattern and how they can help you achieve better stops, spins, correct leads and more!

 

Julie Goodnight

Julie is the popular RFD-TV host of Horse Master airing Monday and Saturday nights. Julie travels the USA sharing her no-nonsense horsemanship training with riders of all disciplines. Whether you ride English, Western, dressage or trail ride, Julie’s “Classic Skills for a Natural Ride” teaching helps you feel more confident in the saddle and helps you understand the “whys” of horsemanship. She loves continually learning and sharing horse behavior insights and she relates that knowledge to how you should interact with your horses. She’s experienced in dressage and jumping, racing, reining, cow horse, colt-starting, and wilderness riding. You’ve probably seen her articles in Horse & Rider, The Trail Rider and many other horse publications. Julie is honored to be the International Spokesperson for the Certified Horsemanship Association and was named Equine Affaire’s Exceptional Equestrian Educator. Julie grew up on the hunter-jumper circuits in Florida, but is now at home in the west. She and her husband Rich Moorhead live in the mountains. Both love versatility ranch horse competitions and riding cow-horses.

It’s Time for the Classics! – Miller Coliseum – Friday at Noon

With the increasing popularity of Western Dressage, classical riding is enjoying a resurgence in both the English and Western worlds, and with riders young and old. We’ll delve into traditional techniques for teaching the classics, how to utilize the arena, teach your students to visualize lines, and how to apply the important tenets of classical riding in your lessons.

CHA Awards Banquet Keynote – Holiday Inn, Saturday, 7 p.m.

Universal Truths for Horse Professionals As long as there are people owning and riding horses, there will be horse professionals gritting their teeth and repeating the same truths we’ve said a thousand times. We’ll take a humorous look at the universal truths about horses and riding students that we’ve all come to know.

 

Randy Hensley

Randy began his career in hoof care as a conventional farrier over thirty years ago. In 2006, with the prompting of a client, Randy began to explore the benefits of barefoot rehabilitation. Certified by the American Hoof Association (AHA) in 2007, Randy has gone on to help hundreds of horses in over five states. He enjoys the journey of helping horses and their owners return to a healthy, sound lifestyle. Randy has also served as vice president of the AHA & has evaluated and mentored other professional farriers & is currently a field instructor for the Equine Sciences Academy. Aside from helping others, Randy also enjoys working cattle by horseback and building ranch horses.

The Hoof – MTSU Teaching Arena – Friday, 1:30 p.m.

Have you ever considered the hoof to be a living being? What’s going on in there & what is the outside of the hoof telling us? Explore the “tip of the iceberg “in hoof anatomy. Get up close and personal with our cadavers and add another tool to your ever developing tool box! *Helpful hints for those of you running a program that depend upon quality donated horses or for those of you who are just intrigued by feet!

 

Dr. Rhonda Hoffman

Rhonda is a professor and interim director of the Horse Science program at Middle Tennessee State University. She has been teaching horse owners, youth, college students, veterinarians and feed manufacturers about horse nutrition for 20 years. She received a B.S. degree from Truman State University in Missouri, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in equine nutrition from Virginia Tech. Dr. Hoffman earned board-certification as a Diplomate of the American College of Animal Nutrition in 2007. Rhonda views the board certification as a guarantee to herself and her students to remain current and be the best teacher possible. She has published over 80 scientific research and popular press articles, and she has been an invited speaker for over 100 national and international meetings, including conferences in England, Germany, Spain, and a keynote presentation in Brazil. Rhonda is constantly evaluating her approach to teaching, working hard to keep horse nutrition both interesting and applicable to horse owners and students. She was awarded the MTSU Outstanding Teacher Award, the university’s highest teaching recognition, in 2013. Her horse nutrition knowledge and practical experience helps to keep the MTSU school horses looking good and in their best form and usefulness.

Are School Horses Different than Performance Horses? Nutrition for our Teaching Partners – Club Lounge – Friday, 1:30 p.m.

We know proper nutrition cannot guarantee that a performance horse will win, but improper nutrition CAN guarantee a loss. Are school horses any different? This presentation will address common nutritional issues of various types of school horses and strategies for their optimal nutrition. Topics include weight management, aged horses, feed types and costs, supplements, and fuels for performance.

 

Teresa Kackert

Teresa has been CHA Clinic Instructor since 2003. She is an AQHA Professional Horseman and member of the Wrangler Extreme Team She is also Chris Irwin Natural Horsemanship ‘Double-Gold’ Certified and a Richard Shrake Resistance Free Riding Master Level Trainer/Instructor. Teresa is the creator of the ‘Soft Touch’ Training Program – Classical Equitation & Natural Horsemanship and has over 20 years professional experience as a rider, competitor, trainer, instructor, clinician and personal coach. She is founder of Great Horses of America, Consignment Horse Sales Company and Co-Founder of Pink Heart Pony Kids, Inc. Teresa specializes in: confidence building in both horse and rider, horse behavior modification, motivational personal coaching and skill enhancement for riders & horses of all levels and disciplines. www.GreatHorses.org.

Jumping Exercises for Different Levels – MTSU Teaching Arena – Friday, 10:30 a.m.

 

Danielle Koren

Danielle is a certified marketing specialist, multi-disciplinary project manager, business process analyst and photographer. She has joined Schleese Saddlery Service Ltd. in the position of Marketing Manager in January, 2016. Danielle has over 20 years of experience in planning and executing strategic initiatives through employments at organizations in the private and not-for-profit sector. In addition, she has over five years’ experience in designing and delivering marketing, branding and communications initiatives, and executing photo assignments through her own business. Danielle has a Management Master’s degree, has the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential and obtained the Certified Marketing Specialist™ designation. She has over 12 years over horseback riding experience.

Women, Are You Riding in a Saddle Made for a Man? – Miller Club – Friday, 10:30 a.m.

Riding shouldn’t hurt. The unspoken reality is many female riders suffer from pelvic discomfort, struggle with position (shoulder-hip- heel alignment), sit crooked, feel unbalanced in the saddle, and endure recurring back, hip and neck pain. These common issues are often the result of riding in a saddle made for a man. This session will include discussion, videos, power point, live demonstrations and exercises including:

  • Differences in female and male anatomy and pelvis relating to riding and the seat (pelvis, leg ratios, musculature, skeletal) showing the differences that dictate different saddle design for women
  • Saddles design for women and for men – what is the difference?
  • Gender correct saddles and back comfort for the horse
  • Improving effective use of aids in your lessons
  • Interchangeable male female ground seats
  • How to evaluate saddle fit to rider – diagnostic saddle fit checklist

 

Christy Landwehr

Christy Landwehr has been active in the horse industry for over 35 years. Hunter/jumper, dressage, native costume, side saddle, western pleasure, hunter pleasure, barrel racing, endurance riding and saddle seat equitation are just some of the disciplines Christy has competed in at the local, regional and national levels in multiple breeds. She has been teaching children and adults how to ride for over 25 years. Christy is not only the Chief Executive Officer, but also a Master Level Riding Instructor/Clinician, Equine Facility Manager/Clinician and Site Visitor Trainer for CHA and has taught students in 4-H and Pony Club. She is a Past President of the American Youth Horse Council and she also founded, competed on and coached the University of Colorado at Boulder Intercollegiate Horse Show Association equestrian team.  Christy is an AQHA Professional Horseman and on the AQHA National Marketing Committee. Christy was recently appointed to the Colorado State University Equine Sciences Advisory Council.  With an undergraduate degree in public relations/speech communication from California State University Fullerton and a graduate degree in mass communication/journalism from University of Colorado at Boulder, Christy has vast experience in marketing and business. She was the Sponsorship and Youth Programs Manager for the Arabian Horse Association, a trainer for Skill Path Seminars, a television news reporter for WB Channel2 in Denver and the Development Director for The Urban Farm that works with at-risk youth. Christy has spoken at numerous equine events throughout her career including: Arabian Horse Association Conventions, Back Country Horsemen National Convention, American Paint Horse Association Convention, Taking the Reins in WI, Equine Affaire in CA, OH and MA, American Hippotherapy Association Conferences, Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship Conventions, Mane Event in Edmonton, AQHA Conventions, American Camp Association Conventions and many others.

Real Colors Personality Style Assessment for You, Your Students and Your Horses – Thursday – 5:30 – Holiday Inn

For just $20 come and take the Real Colors Personality test to see if you are Gold, Green, Blue, Orange or a combination of colors. This instrument can be helpful working with students, your family and friends and even your horses. Come and find out how and take the instrument home with you.

Dr. Tom Lenz

Dr. Lenz has been active for more than 40 years in the world of equine veterinary health. He has dedicated his life to educating others about animal welfare, often speaking to audiences in the equine, veterinary, and agriculture industries, as well as governmental groups. Dr. Lenz is a Past President of the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) and was honored with the 2005 AAEP Distinguished Service Award and the AAEP Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. He is also a past chair of the AAEP’s Welfare Committee. He is currently on welfare committees for the American Horse Council, the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association, the American Quarter Horse Association, the Missouri Veterinary Medical Association, and the American Veterinary Medical Association. He is a trustee of the American Horse Council (AHC), the past chair of the Unwanted Horse Coalition, and the current chair of the AHC’s Welfare Committee. He has also served the American Quarter Horse Association as an honorary Vice President, co-chair of the Research Committee, and a member of AQHA’s Nominations, Credentials, and Research Committee. His monthly column for the “American Quarter Horse Journal” and “Quarter Horse Racing Journal” has run for more than 20 years. Dr. Lenz graduated from the University of Missouri’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 1975. He earned Diplomate status in the American College of Theriogenologists in 1986 and an MS in Equine Reproduction from Texas A&M University in 1988. The University of Missouri honored Dr. Lenz as the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Alumnus of the Year in 1995 and as a distinguished alumni in 1997. He currently resides in Louisburg, Kansas.

Animal Welfare: Lessons Learned – Holiday Inn – Thursday, 4 p.m.

This presentation will focus on lessons we learned in dealing with equine welfare issues and the Unwanted Horse situation. In the past, welfare issues were discussed and resolved within the horse community, but this was the first national issue where non-horse owners and animal activists, as well as state and local officials, were involved in the debate and resolutions discussion. The result was a change on how we communicate and address equine welfare issues.

 

Julie Little

Julie is the founder of Equine Office, which specializes in dedicated invoicing services for equine businesses. In dealing with barn owners, coaches and trainers, she has been exposed to the many different ways clients implement their procedural policies. Julie began her career as a software developer. She has lived and worked (and of course ridden!) throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe. She subsequently started and operated a hunter/jumper riding school and training business of her own for many years. Bringing the best of both careers together, she developed specialized invoicing software which led to the founding of Equine Office. Julie holds bachelors degrees in English and Biology from the University of Toronto, and in Computer and Information Science from the University of Maryland. She experienced many different disciplines of riding growing up, but it was her passion for jumpers which led to years of training and showing on the ‘A’ circuit. Julie gives clinics and judges horse shows when time permits.

Business Solutions for Equine Professionals – Miller Club – Friday, 3 p.m.

Running a coaching business or riding school can be a stressful operation as you try to please everyone. Having solid procedures in place can help smooth those bumps and make everyone’s experience easier. In this workshop we will discuss solutions which businesses like yours have used successfully. Among the topics we will cover are how to handle make-up lessons, and how to best avoid late paying clients. We will consider the pros and cons of different types of lesson packages. We will examine the challenge of getting clients to financially commit to trailering and coaching plans for horse shows. With these and other related topics, you will benefit from other coaches’ experiences. You will be able take home ideas you can apply to make your particular business more efficient (and hopefully give you less headaches)!

 

Jim McDonald

Jim is a lifelong horseman and a lifelong learner. In the year 2000, he started a non-profit organization dedicated to horsemanship education. Part of its mission is to make the joy of a relationship with a horse available to people who would not ordinarily have that opportunity and that was the original motivation for founding the Graham Equestrian center (www.Grahameq.org). They work closely with anyone who wants to advance their horsemanship skills and knowledge. Jim has been the CHA Board Treasurer and an AQHA Professional Horseman.

Teaching Horsemanship Skills for Effective Communication with Horses – Miller Club – Friday, 9 a.m.

This classroom instruction is design to present effective skills for making your intent clear to the horse. The knowledge and skills based on behavioral science. Understanding prey animal psychology and operant conditioning will be the emphasis of this presentation.

 

Debi Metcalfe

Debi is a well-known speaker and clinician hailing from Shelby, NC where she heads Stolen Horse InternationalTM, the only group that has advocated for the victims of rural crime-particularly equine theft-since 1992. She and husband Harold started the organization after the theft of their own mare, Idaho (recently crossed the Rainbow Bridge at age 31). Because of this brutal experience, Debi found the power of networking and social media-and the moniker of ‘NetPosse’ was used to describe that network by the media. It stuck and became the website name. Today, the NetPosse rides the internet on several social media sites-not just Facebook. Committed horse people of all descriptions are encouraged to participate in the ALERT network, volunteer, and become partners and/or sponsors. All it takes is ONE person who sees that horse we are looking for and who makes that call. NetPosseTM-Bringing Horses Home.

Dealing with a Stolen Horse – Miller Club – Saturday, 10:30 a.m., TBA

 

National Reining Horse Association

First offered in 2010 at the Alltech© FEI World Equestrian Games in Lexington, Ky., “NRHA Ride a Reiner” has taken the country by storm by giving novice and experienced riders the opportunity to ride a reining horse. Nowhere else in the world can spectators find an option like this: the chance to receive a hands-on lesson from an NRHA Professional, to enjoy a dizzying spin and to feel the power of sliding stops on a well-trained reining horse!

 Ride a Reiner – Miller Coliseum – Saturday at Noon

 

Andrew Fox – NRHA Professional

Andrew is the head trainer and ranch manager for Darling 888 Ranch, located in Princeton, Kentucky. Originally, from Newmarket, England Andrew began his career riding western pleasure, reined cow horses and horsemanship. He showed his first reining horse when he was 14 years old. He won a European championship title at the age of 15 and has had continued success since then. Andrew has a degree in Equine Science from Cambridge College of Agriculture. Since moving to the United States in early 2008, Andrew has lifetime earnings just under $70,000 and has won various titles including the Alabama, Kentucky, and Missouri Futurities. Andrew has also won the Nebraska Big Red Derby, earned multiple Top Ten NRHA world titles in three different categories and made the open NRHA Derby finals. As a coach, Andrew has enabled his group of non-pros to achieve their goals which include winners of multiple Circuit Championships, Saddle Series, NRHA Top Ten World Titles (non-pro; youth), affiliate finalists and countless first place plaques, buckles and trophies. Andrew also has helped NRHA with Rookie Days and continues to host clinics at the ranch for others to strengthen their reining skills.

 

Hayley Eberle – NRHA Manager of Marketing and Communication

Originally from Georgia, Hayley became involved with horses at a young age. Having competed in several equestrian disciplines from speed events to hunt seat classes, she became successful and desired to be involved in the equestrian industry. A graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, Hayley earned a Bachelor’s degree in Horse Science with a Minor in Business Administration while competing in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association shows and on the horse judging team. To gain experience with event management and horse associations while still in college, she spent much of her free time working equestrian events such as American Stock Horse Association Shows and American Quarter Horse Association events. Hayley also received her AQHA Show Management certification in 2012. Since early 2013, Hayley has been employed with the National Reining Horse Association. She currently manages the Sire and Dam program, marketing of NRHA’s programs, communications to members, outside advertising, and alliances, all while fulfilling additional responsibilities, such as serving as staff liaison to three committees. Hayley also serves on the American Youth Horse Council Board of Directors as well as several committees for the organization. When she isn’t traveling to represent NRHA at events and conferences, she still works local equestrian events.

 

Heidi Potter

Heidi is an internationally known and respected Certified Centered Riding© Clinician, CHA Master Instructor/Clinician and Horse Agility Accredited Trainer from Southern Vermont. She teaches a wide variety of training and riding clinics at her facility, The New England Center for Horsemanship and abroad. Horses and humans alike benefit from her extensive knowledge and gentle approach. As a natural style trainer she specializes in the gentle and progressive way of working with horses. Her ability to read the horse and then progress with calmness, clarity and consistency has proven successful in building more safe, trusting, respectful and enjoyable partnerships between horses and their humans.

Centered Riding© Exercises for All Riders – Miller Coliseum – Saturday, 10:30 a.m.

Learn exercises created by Centered Riding’s founder Sally Swift designed to assist riders in achieving better balance, improved stability and clearer communication with their horse.

Demystifying the Half Halt – MSTU Teaching Arena – Saturday, 3 p.m.

Learn what the half-halt is, how to apply, when to apply it and how to teach it. This session will include interactive exercises with humans, followed by mounted application.

 

Cathy Rothery

Cathy joined Schleese Saddlery Service in 2000, bringing 20 years’ experience in banking, human resources and running a small business. She joined the Saddlefit 4 Life© team in 2006 as Director of International Marketing and focuses on developing innovative educational projects in a variety of media, and courses offered. A passionate advocate for horse and rider well-being and comfort, Cathy reaches out to equine associations to provide saddle fit education to protect horse and rider from long term damage caused by ill-fitting saddles. Cathy graduated from the University of Guelph (Honour Bachelor of Applied Science) and is married, and mom of two adult children, various rescue dogs and grand dogs.

Women, Are You Riding in a Saddle Made for a Man? – Miller Club – Friday, 10:30 a.m.

Riding shouldn’t hurt. The unspoken reality is many female riders suffer from pelvic discomfort, struggle with position (shoulder-hip-heel alignment), sit crooked, feel unbalanced in the saddle, and endure recurring back, hip and neck pain. These common issues are often the result of riding in a saddle made for a man. This session will include discussion, videos, PowerPoint, live demonstrations and exercises, including:

  • Differences in female and male anatomy and pelvis relating to riding and the seat (pelvis, leg ratios, musculature, skeletal) showing the differences that dictate different saddle design for women
  • Saddles design for women and for men – what is the difference?
  • Gender correct saddles and back comfort for the horse
  • Improving effective use of aids in your lessons
  • Interchangeable male female ground seats
  • How to evaluate saddle fit to rider – diagnostic saddle fit checklist

 

Tara Reimer

Tara has always been involved with horses whether training, driving, riding or showing. Tara and her husband, Derek, own/operate Cloud 9 Ranch near Steinbach, Manitoba where she spends most of her time teaching Western and English riding and vaulting lessons, facilitating equine assisted psychotherapy, group discovery and therapeutic riding as well as training horses, judging shows and giving clinics. She is a CHA Clinic Instructor and the CHA Region 2 Director. In 2013, she was the CHA Instructor of the Year! EAGALA certified, she is the Equine Specialist on her equine assisted psychotherapy team. She is also an AQHA Professional Horseman and longtime exhibitor. With Equestrian Canada she is a Western Coach and General Performance Judge. Tara continues to show horses herself and enjoys the challenge of preparing young horses for Futurities. Tara’s passion is teaching, humans and horses, to develop their talents. Tara was twice a guest instructor on the Florida based Horses in the Morning radio show with CHA and has presented at the CHA International Conference in Lexington, Kentucky and at Horse 3 in Brandon. www.cloud9ranch.ca

Effective Groundwork – Miller Coliseum – Saturday, 9 a.m.

Ground work to ‘check in’ makes for calmer, more productive time spent with your horse. Learn how the horse’s brain works so you can identify a lack of confidence, then see how I use a combination of ground work exercises to build the horse’s confidence and activities using equine assisted learning to build our student’s confidence. What does the horse need from you as the handler? Learn more about yourself and how to better communicate, to horses and people. Easy to apply techniques and audience participation.

 

Jochen Schleese

Former member of the German young rider’s Three Day Event Team, Jochen qualified for the European Championships in 1984, but had to retire his horse due to lameness, which abruptly ended his riding career. Years later, through research Jochen discovered his horse’s lameness was caused by damage to the scapular cartilage from an ill-fitting saddle. This was the catalyst for Jochen’s life-long mission to prevent saddle related damage for all horses. Jochen graduated from Passier in 1985 as the youngest Certified Master Saddler in Germany at the time. He came to Canada as the Official Saddler for the 1986 World Dressage Championships. Jochen registered the trade of saddlery in North America in 1990, and operates the only authorized training facility for this trade in Ontario. He established Saddlefit 4 LifeÒ (2006) as an independent organization to teach saddle fit evaluation and analyses, and certify professionals in equine and saddle ergonomics. Jochen lectures at the German Professional Trainers Association in Warendorf Germany, at veterinary conferences in Brazil and is a frequent clinician at trade shows and equine forums worldwide. Jochen is on the advisory board of the Equine Sciences Academy and an education partner with the Ontario Equestrian Federation.

Western Saddle Fit – MTSU Teaching Arena – Saturday, 10:30 a.m.

This interactive demonstration will discuss:

  • Fitting challenges of western saddles
  • Center of balance relative to breed and discipline
  • Correct Saddle Support Area on the horse’s back
  • The 9 Points of Saddle Fit (static) – principles illustrated on horse’s back
  • Dynamic Fit (in motion)
  • Use of saddle blankets- saddle pads
  • Evaluating saddle fit for western saddles – principles and demo
  • Interchangeable – male-female ground seats
  • Systems to achieve optimal fit as the horse changes and develops

Saddle Fit Considerations for Various Breeds – Miller Coliseum – Saturday, 3 p.m.

The number of different breeds and the use of horses have changed dramatically over the last 150 years. Veterinary and medical findings reveal incorrectly fitting saddles can cause pain and damage to the horse. Correct saddle fit facilitates optimum performance and promotes back health. In addition to age and conditioning discussion will include principles professionals need to consider related to conformational differences (back lengths, shoulder conformations, spine, withers) of various breeds which present unique saddle fitting requirements and potential challenges. The horse’s back remains a very sensitive area, despite goals of targeted selection and breeding. One saddle does not fit all.

 

Randi Thompson

Randi is the founder of the “Horse and Rider Awareness® Educational Programs” and ”How to Market Your Horse Business.”  She has been in the horse industry for over 40 years and has been coaching professionals for 20+ years in horse-and-rider training, business and marketing. Randi has worked with many breeds of horses and styles of riding in her career and has produced national winners in the worlds of dressage, hunter/jumper, western pleasure, and flat-shod walking horses. Randi is a Master Instructor for the CHA (English, Jumping, Western) and is available to come to your location for clinics and instructor training. Randi also offers instructor programs with recognized judges for those who want to focus more on coaching or competing in Jumping or Dressage (Tryon, NC area). For more information on how Randi can make a difference for you, go to http://www.horseandriderawareness.com.

Riding Position Magic – MTSU Teaching Arena – Saturday, 1:30 p.m.

Teaching a rider a balanced riding position is an art. First we start with the basics… than what do you do? How can you take a rider to the next level in their training process? Now you can watch what happens as Randi shows use techniques that you can use to improve your more advanced students riding position and balance.

 

Carla Wennberg

Carla has been an AQHA judge for 30 years and an NSBA and NRHA for judge 27 years. She was the AQHA 2008 Professional Horsewoman of the Year and for over 25 years was the Instructor and Coach for University of Georgia, Colorado State University, and last ten years at St Andrews University in North Carolina. Carla has coached for the past 10 years, IHSA western for St Andrews University and this year tied for First at IHSA Nationals with Berry College in Georgia. Carla has judged 13 Open and Amateur World Championship shows for AQHA, 3 Youth World Championships for AQHA, 3 All American Quarter Horse Congress shows, and 2 European Championships in Germany. She is also a clinician and master instructor with CHA. Having already staffed a CHA Certification Standard clinic at St. Andrews. Carla loves competing her FEI level gelding and is just 2 scores away from a Silver USDF Medal.

Western Horsemanship Exercises – Miller Coliseum – Friday, 1:30 p.m.

We will start this session with a quick warm up for riders to have a balanced position and explain why it works! Balancing exercises in transitions and the many ways it works for both horse and rider will be examined. Then the steps of collection required in the exercise will be explained. Next, the steering exercises including first with squares and how it works for horses and riders and then controlling the shoulders of both the riders and the horses.  We will also discuss the mental preparation required for the horsemanship rider and how it helps in all pattern work.

 

Dave Whitaker

Dr. Whitaker was the long-time Director of Horse Science at MTSU until 2014.  Dave may be best known for his judging teams who won every major contest including Appaloosas, Paints, Morgans, the AQHA World three times, and the Congress five times.  Dave was an AQHA Director and AQHA judge for more than 31 years.  He has judged horse shows in eleven countries and forty-two states, including the AQHA World Show three times, the Youth World three times, the Select World and the Congress, and the Texas State 4-H Show, possibly his favorite, four times.  He has done clinics in other countries as well, most notably New Zealand, where he was able to combine his knowledge and love of horses with two of his other animal passions on a huge sheep ranch…that also trains their own working stock dogs.  He hosted summer youth horsemanship camps at MTSU for 30 years. Nationally, he served as Chair of AQHA’s Youth Committee and Research Committee which determines disposition of nearly half a million dollars a year in research funding for three years each, as well as serving on the International Committee and Nominations/Credentials Committee. For three years he was the sole non-veterinarian on the Board of the American Assoc. of Equine Practitioners, and currently serves on the AQHA Welfare Committee. A few of the numerous awards that he has won that are very meaningful to him include the TN State 4-H Family Award, Distinguished Alumni from the University of Tennessee, AQHA’s Merle Wood Humanitarian Award, and the National Honorary American Farmer degree from the national FFA convention. Dave and his wife Pat, an Extension educator in Consumer and Family Science, have three children and five grandchildren.

About Middle Tennessee State University Horse Science Program – Holiday Inn – Thursday, 2 p.m.

 

Barbara Wolke

Barbara is the Vice President of the Rutherford County Convention & Visitors Bureau. She joined the Convention & Visitors Bureau staff in 2003. She has 30 years of experience in sales and the hospitality industry. Barbara earned her designation as a Certified Hospitality Sales Professional from the Educational Institute with the American Hotel & Motel Association. She earned industry designations as a Travel Marketing Professional from the Southeast Tourism Society Marketing College and as a Certified Tennessee Tourism Professional from the Tennessee Tourism Roundtable. Barbara is a native of Middle Tennessee and a 35 year resident of Rutherford County. She is an active member of the Tennessee Society of Association Executives, American Bus Association, Rutherford County and Tennessee Hospitality Associations, and the National Association of Sports Commissions. Barbara is a graduate of the Transit Citizen Leadership Academy, Dale Carnegie Course and the 2015 Leadership Rutherford program.

Welcome to Murfreesboro! – Holiday Inn – Thursday, 5:30 p.m.

 

Lisa Wysocky

Lisa is a registered level PATH International instructor and also holds certifications as a mentor, and an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning. In addition, she has been chosen as one of the country’s Top 50 riding instructors by ARIA. With a life balanced between books and horses, Lisa is an author, equine clinician, and motivational speaker who trains horses for and consults with therapeutic riding programs. Lisa graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in equine management. Early wins on the national Appaloosa horse show circuit took Lisa across North America, where she was asked to speak, or to write articles for national publications. Lisa’s passion for writing and speaking led to a second run at college where she studied communications and journalism. Lisa is the co-author of a number of books, including My Horse, My Partner: Teamwork on the Ground, which helps horse and human partners form amazing bonds using traditional ground training, natural horsemanship, and desensitization. Lisa combines her love of horses and country music in Horse Country: A Celebration of Country Music and the Love of Horses. This beautiful coffee table book features twenty-seven of the top stars of country music talking about how horses changed their life for the better. Lisa’s six-time award winning Cat Enright equestrian mystery series has recently been optioned for film and television. Lisa is the executive director of Colby’s Army, a therapeutic riding and life learning center, and has a clinic schedule that tales her nationwide. Learn more at http://www.lisawysocky.com.

Choosing the Lesson Horse – MTSU Teaching Arena – Friday, 3 p.m.

Lesson horses are the backbone of any instructor’s barn, but the builds of some horses are better suited for one purpose or another. We all want our horses to stay in our programs for many years, but like people, the bodies of some horses wear out faster than others. Comparing the conformation of several lesson horses, Lisa takes the audience through the pros and cons of each horse as a long-term lesson prospect. From nose to tail, Lisa educates instructors on the best choices for their lesson program.

The Green Barn – Miller Club – Saturday, 9 a.m.

As we become more conscious of good environmental practices, those ideas must also extend to the barn. Many of us also have horses and/or riders with allergies, and those sensitivities can be reduced by using products that are less harsh. From innovative stall beddings, to recycling and repurposing, Lisa presents fun, affordable, and easy to implement eco-friendy solutions that benefit all. Some will even widen your reach within your local community and bring new people to your barn.

 

JoAnne Young

JoAnne has been teaching riding and training horses for over 40 years, and is happy that she is still learning. Every student and every horse bring fresh challenges that keep life interesting. She has been privileged and blessed beyond her wildest dreams to study with such wonderful instructors as Walter Zettl (dressage coach to Canadian event team when they won bronze at Los Angeles Olympics), Bertin Potter in Germany, Molly Sivewright (FEI judge and past chair of the Fellows of the British Horse Society), Carel Eijkenaar (FEI judge), Eddo Hoestra (F.E.I. Trainer) and Doris Halstead (Physical Therapist and author of “Releasing the Potential: Physical Therapy Modalities for Horse and Rider.” Jo-Anne is the author of the M.A. thesis: “Preparing students for riding instructor certification through college curricula.”

Lateral Movements for all Levels of Riders – Miller Coliseum – Saturday, 1:30 p.m.

“Lateral” means “sideways” or “all on one side”, but the skills and movements included in the term range from improving basic beginner steering to advanced level maneuvers. Riders in this workshop will work at their own level. Those new to lateral work will be introduced to the many basic uses and the required aids. Those further along in their riding education will work on refining their aids and timing as they use lateral work to improve the horse’s balance, responsiveness and range of motion.

Industry Breed and Discipline Organizations Join Forces with Time to Ride Challenge

For more information, contact:
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact – Christie Schulte, christie@timetoride.com or 512-591-7811

Additional incentives offered for members who participate by introducing new people
to horses.

May 27, 2016, Georgetown, Texas – Several horse industry breed and discipline organizations have joined forces with the 2016 Time to Ride Challenge to introduce new horse enthusiasts to riding. The Challenge will award $100,000 cash and prizes to the stables, clubs, and businesses who can generate the most “newcomer” interactions with horses; and now participants can also win cash and prizes from breed and discipline organizations of which they are a member.

In addition to the Marketing Alliance Members and Partners, who fund and support Time to Ride, five American Horse Council-member organizations are offering additional incentives: the Certified Horsemanship Association, Arabian Horse Association, United States Dressage Federation, Appaloosa Horse Club, and Pinto Horse Association of America. Each group will award prizes to the members of their association who do best in the Challenge.

Additional prizes offered range from trophy buckles and year-end ceremony recognition, to up to thousands of dollars in cash and prizes, which the Arabian Horse Association is rewarding. These awards are available to members of each organization in addition to the $100,000 cash and prizes they can win as participants in the Time to Ride Challenge.

“Support from these groups make the Challenge even more exciting by giving participants yet another way to win. For example, a stable could win $5,000 as a second-place finisher in its division and also win a trophy buckle from the Certified Horsemanship Association as the highest-placing CHA member in the Challenge,” stated Christie Schulte. “We are thrilled that these organizations have joined our cause this year and are encouraging their membership base to grow their own businesses, disciplines, and breeds.”

“We’re excited to offer American Quarter Horse Association members another reason to participate in this important initiative,” said Craig Huffhines, AQHA Executive Vice President. “Our members will not only have the opportunity to win cash and prizes, they’ll be growing their own businesses and increasing exposure to the American Quarter Horse.”

Since 2014, Challenge participants have introduced over 60,000 new people to horses through beginner friendly events. Stables, clubs and businesses are invited to sign up for the 2016 Challenge by visiting timetoride.com. The Challenge begins June 1st. Upon registration a user can specify which organization he/she is a member of to become eligible for the additional prizes. To learn more visit the website or contact info@timetoride.com.

The American Horse Council’s Marketing Alliance
Time to Ride is an initiative of the American Horse Council’s Marketing Alliance, formed to connect people with horses. It is designed to encourage horse-interested consumers to enjoy the benefits of horse activities. The AHC Marketing Alliance is made up of the following organizations: the American Association of Equine Practitioners, Active Interest Media, the American Quarter Horse Association, Dover Saddlery, Farnam, Merck, Merial, Morris Media Network Equine Group, Purina Animal Nutrition LLC, Platinum Performance, United States Equestrian Federation, and Zoetis. Program Partners are Absorbine, the American Paint Horse Association, Equibrand, the National Cutting Horse Association, the National Reining Horse Association, Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, and the Texas A&M University Equine Initiative, Lumina Media, Pyranha, the America’s Mustang Campaign, and Colorado State University Equine Sciences Program

About the American Horse Council
The American Horse Council is a non-profit organization that includes all segments of the horse industry. While its primary mission is to represent the industry before Congress and the federal regulatory agencies in Washington, DC, it also undertakes national initiatives for the horse industry. Time to Ride, the AHC’s Marketing Alliance to connect horses and people, is such an effort. The American Horse Council hopes that Time to Ride will encourage people and businesses to participate in the industry, enjoy our horses, and support our equine activities and events. The AHC believes a healthy horse industry contributes to the health of Americans and America in many ways.

Certified Horsemanship Association and APHA Partner for Expanded Education and Paint Recognition

For more information, contact:
APHA Marketing
(817) 834-2742
www.apha.com

(May 2016) – APHA recently joined forces with Certified Horsemanship Association, the
largest certifying body of riding instructors and barn managers in North America, to help
promote education, safety and fun through horsemanship.

CHA promotes excellence in safety and education for the benefit of the horse industry.
Among their services are certifying instructors and trail guides, accrediting equestrian
facilities, publishing educational manuals, horsemanship DVDs and YouTube safety shorts,
and hosting regional and international conferences.

APHA also strives to increase education among its membership, as well as the greater horse
community. APHA Director of Judges, David Dellin, says this new alliance partnership
provides ample opportunities to accomplish APHA’s educational goals.

“CHA’s mission aligns perfectly with our Markel/APHA Professional Horsemen program, as
well as several other APHA initiatives. We enjoyed hosting CHA’s Christy Landwehr at our
annual APHA Convention in February, and I look forward to sharing APHA’s “The Game
Plan” seminar with CHA International Conference attendees in October,” David said.
Likewise, CHA is excited about the partnership.

“The equine professional members of the Certified Horsemanship Association are thrilled to
partner with the American Paint Horse Association,” CHA Chief Executive Officer Christy
Landwehr said. “Many of our certified riding instructors have registered APHA horses as
lesson horses and as their own personal mounts, so this is such a natural fit. We are excited to
work together.”

One unique aspect of the new partnership includes an annual award for CHA’s Most
Valuable Paint Horse, which will recognize the organization’s top Paint Horse. Additionally,
CHA will provide monthly safety tips to APHA members and Facebook fans.
For more information about CHA, please visit cha-ahse.org or call 859-259-3399. To find a
certified horseback riding instructor or accredited equine facility near you, visit
chainstructors.com.

###
About APHA
The American Paint Horse Association is the world’s second-largest international equine
breed association, registering more than a million horses in 59 nations and territories since it
was founded. APHA creates and maintains programs that increase the value of American
Paint Horses and enriches members’ experiences with their horses.

AHA Continues Educational Alliance with Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 12, 2016
Contact: AHA
303.696.4500

12-MAY-16 – AURORA, COLO. – The Arabian Horse Association (AHA) is thrilled to announce the
continued Educational Alliance with the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA), through a renewed
two (2) year contract.

CHA is a 501(c)3 nonprofit that strives to teach and promote excellence in safety and education for the
benefit of the entire horse community and industry. By certifying instructors, accrediting equine facilities,
and producing educational conferences and resources such as horsemanship manuals, DVD’s, safety
videos, webinars, blogs and more, CHA strives to “change lives through safe experiences with horses”
(CHA Website, Why Statement).

“Certified Horsemanship Association is turning 50 years old next year and is glad that the Arabian Horse
Association will be along for the ride during this exciting time,” says Christy Landwehr, CHA Chief
Executive Officer. “Many of our instructors and lesson barns have Arabians and Half-Arabians that their
students love to learn from. We want to provide a way for our members to learn more about what AHA
has to offer them, as well as what CHA has to offer in return.”

Through the alliance with CHA, AHA members will find numerous benefits. These benefits include
access to CHA’s accredited riding facilities and certified instructors. CHA also provides opportunities for
Arabian barn owners and lesson programs to become accredited, helping them to market themselves and
earn possible insurance discounts. The Arabian breed will also benefit as a whole, receiving promotion
through CHA on some educational materials, educational videos and programs throughout the year.

“We are thrilled to be continuing our alliance with CHA,” says Julian McPeak, AHA Director of
Marketing. “We really hope that our members who own and run riding facilities geared towards amateurs
and youth will utilize CHA as a resource and reap the many benefits and educational opportunities that
they offer. The promotion for the Arabian breed, showing their gentle nature and ability to interact with
all ages and riding levels through CHA promotional materials is important to us.”

AHA will promote CHA through their website, social media, e-blasts and magazine articles, encouraging
members to take advantage of their tools and educational resources. AHA members who become CHA
certified or accredited and are an AHA Discovery Farm and Learn to Ride program instructors, will be
recognized and searchable by the general public through AHA’s Get Local webpage.

To learn more about CHA and their accreditation and certification programs, visit www.CHA-ahse.org/.
AHA is excited for all that is in store for their members through this Educational Alliance.
AHA is a major equine association serving 84,000 Arabian, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horse owners across North America.
AHA registers and maintains a database of more than one million Arabian, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses. AHA produces
championship events, recognizes over 400 Arabian horse shows and distance rides and provides activities, education, and
programs that promote breeding and ownership.

2015 CHA International Conference Speakers

Kim Brown

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Kim has more than 35 years of experience equine industry publishing and marketing. Currently she is the Associate Publisher/Editor of two brands for Active Interest Media (AIM) that are focused on business. EquiManagement is for equine veterinarians and Stable Management is for farm/stable owners and riding instructors. Kim’s background includes nearly 30 years at Blood-Horse Publications, the first 15 with The Blood-Horse magazine, ending up as a Contributing Editor, and the second 15 developing The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care as the Publisher/Editor. Kim retired from publishing to become Global Marketing Manager at Kentucky Equine Research, and while there lead the team that created award-winning newsletters and videos, launched a new content-driven educational website, and developed an e-commerce site. Kim then ran her own marketing/content development company for a short time before accepting a full-time position with AIM’s Equine Network. Kim and her musician husband, Ben, moved from Kentucky to Wyoming and are enjoying the outdoor life riding horses, camping, cycling, hiking, fishing, canoeing, and Kim’s favorite—rockhounding. Kim can be reached at KBrown@THINInc.com.

Luck is Where Preparation Meets Opportunity Keynote – Thursday – 3 p.m. 

 

Fred Bruce

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Fred won the CHA Distinguished Service Award in 2009.  He is a Standard, Combined, Seasonal, Trail, Driving and Equine Facility Managers Clinic Instructor for CHA. He has been a part of CHA since 1981 and has been instrumental in starting and improving many CHA certification programs. Fred has been a contributing author for many of the CHA manuals and has served on the CHA Board of Directors.  Fred currently lives in Holbrook, Arizona.

Knot Tying 101 – Trail Encampment – Friday 10:30 a.m.

This session will prepare you to try out your hand at the Markel Trail Challenge and also to get your own knots around horses and packing better. Come for a hands-on and fun experience with ropes!

Packing – Trail Encampment – Friday at 3 p.m.

This session will involve learning how to pack a horse to go into the back country. Keeping your loads safe and balanced and what types of hitches to use. 
 

Tara Gamble

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Tara has been the Past President of the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and of the Alberta Equestrian Federation (AEF), as well as the opportunity to represent Canada as Runner-Up Miss Rodeo Canada 1998.  She has served on the Equine Canada Board of Directors as a representative to recreation, and on the Strathcona County Economic Development and Advisory Committee as the agricultural representative.  It has been an honor for Tara to receive both the CHA Clinic Instructor of the year (2006), and Volunteer of the year (2013) awards. 

She is a CHA Clinic Instructor, and a designated Professional Horseman with the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) and was appointed to the AQHA Youth Activities Committee in 2012, where she is able to contribute to her vision of helping the industry to work collaboratively to strengthen it.  Her education includes a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture from the University of Alberta.

With over twenty three years of industry teaching experience and a background in both western and english, Tara offers weekly riding lessons at her facility east of Ardrossan, Alberta.  In addition, she judges various horsemanship competitions, presents seminars and instructs clinics.  She has been fortunate to work with many equine professionals on the provincial, national and international levels which has greatly enriched her experiences.  

Transitions to Improve Lightness – Indoor Arena – Friday at 10:30 a.m. 

This session will focus on how the use of transitions can assist in creating a more responsive and lighter horse. Through a series of exercises you will see a progression of how both the rider and horse improve their responsiveness to the aids, and discuss the benefits of this.  The ultimate goal is to achieve a true partnership; working in harmony to develop feel as a rider and in turn a more attentive, supple and lighter horse.  

 

Julie Goodnight

Julie-Goodnight.jpgJulie is the popular RFD-TV host of Horse Master airing Monday and Saturday nights. Julie travels the USA sharing her no-nonsense horsemanship training with riders of all disciplines. Whether you ride English, Western, dressage or trail ride, Julie’s “Classic Skills for a Natural Ride” teaching helps you feel more confident in the saddle and helps you understand the “whys” of horsemanship. She loves continually learning and sharing horse behavior insights and she relates that knowledge to how you should interact with your horses. She’s experienced in dressage and jumping, racing, reining, cow horse, colt-starting, and wilderness riding. You’ve probably seen her articles in Horse & Rider, The Trail Rider and many other horse publications. Julie is honored to be the International Spokesperson for the Certified Horsemanship Association and was named Equine Affaire’s Exceptional Equestrian Educator. Julie grew up on the hunter-jumper circuits in Florida, but is now at home in the west. She and her husband Rich Moorhead live in the mountains. Both love versatility ranch horse competitions and riding cow-horses. 

Working with Advanced Riders – Indoor Arena – Friday at 9 a.m. 
The Science of Cueing – Indoor Arena – Saturday at 9 a.m.
Schooling the School Horse – East Pen – Saturday at 1:30 p.m.

 

Van Hargis

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Van Hargis is known as one of today’s most versatile horsemen/clinicians. More than just a clinician who talks about horsemanship, Van is a true horseman whose clinic and seminar presentations are born out of real-world experience working with and learning from horses. Van started riding horses when he was only four years old and launched his career as a trainer at twelve when the wife of world-renowned saddle maker Billy Cook hired him to train her horse. He spent much of his youth in the saddle, working cattle at ranches around his Texas home. At the same time Van was honing his skills as a trainer and competitor, taking both his own and his clients’ horses into the show ring and the rodeo arena. Van and the horses he’s trained have excelled in show and rodeo events like ranch horse versatility (his specialty), western pleasure, trail classes, calf roping, team roping, and steer wrestling. Van’s practical experiences on the ranch and in competition, coupled with a dynamic speaking ability, have made him one of the most requested clinicians at equestrian facilities and events across the country. He moves easily across the “great divide” between the western and English riding worlds, and has worked successfully with horses from many disciplines, including both working ranch horses and show horses in western pleasure, hunter-jumper, and dressage. In horsemanship and in life, Van firmly believes there’s “nothing but the basics,” and that those basics are the same no matter what equestrian discipline appeals to you. Van uses each presentation he gives as an opportunity to share how the horse has helped him realize the important lessons in his life. He utilizes the arena and the horse to emphasize the most fundamental lesson: the need for a solid foundation, in horse training as well as everyday life. Van’s ability to use the horse to educate, motivate, inspire, and entertain will encourage you to take a long look at your life, your relationships, and your horsemanship.

Reduce Your Problems to the Ridiculous – Indoor Arena – Saturday at 1:30 p.m.
Are You Focused on Success?  – Keynote – Saturday at 7 p.m. 

 

Craig Huffhines 

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Craig’s enthusiasm is contagious and his knowledge and passion for the agriculture and livestock industries is quickly recognizable. He graduated with a bachelor of science from Texas A&M University and received a master of science from Colorado State University. After college, he began working at the American Hereford Association where he was the director of feedlot and carcass programs and director of Certified Hereford Beef before he was elevated to executive vice president in 1997. 

On April 1, Craig accepted the executive vice president’s position at the world’s largest equine breed organization – the American Quarter Horse Association. Craig brings 17 years of experience with him to the Association. He has recorded success in turning around a 30-year decline in registrations and beef breed popularity, balancing budgets during lean years, developing a new branded-beef enterprise, executing and revising governance structure to meet the demands of the 21st century and reinvigorating the interest among youth, while growing the Hereford Research and Youth foundations and managing the American Hereford Association staff. 

Craig and his wife, Mary Jon, have recently relocated with their sons, Seth, Cole and Miles, to Amarillo, the home of AQHA’s international headquarters. 

Welcome to Amarillo and AQHA – Thursday Reception – AQHA Hall of Famepen

 

Jim Jennings

jim_jennings.jpgJim is the retired Executive Director of Publications for the American Quarter Horse Association. He worked full time for AQHA for 37 years prior to his retirement in 2008, following which he then served the Association as a consultant for another six years. He is the author of the award-winning book “Best Remudas” and of the book “They Still Ride Good Horses,” which was published this year in conjunction with AQHA’s 75th anniversary. He is a past president of American Horse Publications and of the Livestock Publications Council, has been inducted into the LPC Hall of Fame and was named an American Horse Publications Champion. Jim currently serves on the board of trustees for the Texas 4-H Development Foundation. 

Jim and his wife, Mavis, live in Amarillo, and although retired, Jim continues to write for different publications. Currently he writes the scripts for the weekly television show “Somewhere West of Wall Street.”

History of Amarillo – AQHA Hall of Fame – Thursday Reception

 

Teresa Kackert

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Teresa has been CHA Clinic Instructor since 2003. She is an AQHA Professional Horseman and member of the Wrangler Extreme Team She is also Chris Irwin Natural Horsemanship ‘Double-Gold’ Certified and a Richard Shrake Resistance Free Riding Master Level Trainer/Instructor. Teresa is the creator of the ‘Soft Touch’ Training Program – Classical Equitation & Natural Horsemanship and has over 20 years professional experience as a rider, competitor, trainer, instructor, clinician and personal coach. She is founder of Great Horses of America, Consignment Horse Sales Company and Co-Founder of Pink Heart Pony Kids, Inc. Teresa specializes in: confidence building in both horse and rider, horse behavior modification, motivational personal coaching and skill enhancement for riders & horses of all levels and disciplines. www.GreatHorses.org.

Jumping Exercises – Indoor Arena – Friday at 1:30 p.m.

This session will be great for those just starting to teach jumping as well as those that have been coaching this discipline for a while. Come and join us to see different flatwork exercises, ground pole drills and jumping gymnastics and courses to help your riders succeed. 

How to Develop Feel in Riders – East Pen – Saturday at 9 a.m. 

We all strive to achieve true feel when we ride!  Now learn how to teach feel as well. Exercises will be presented at all three gaits for a variety of levels of riders in this session.

 

Stan Loewen

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Stan won the CHA Clinic Staff of the Year Award in 2009. He is a lifetime member of CHA and has been involved since the 1970s. Stan has conducted Standard, Combined, Seasonal and Trail Clinics for CHA. He has put his heart and soul into CHA and has done over 70 clinics, so has certified at the very least over 500 riding instructors and trail guides. Stan has been on the CHA Board of Directors and very helpful in the creation of the Trail Program and the CHA Trail Guide Manual of which he is on the cover packing into the Bob Marshall wilderness.

Packing – Trail Encampment – Friday at 3 p.m.

This session will involve learning how to pack a horse to go into the back country. Keeping your loads safe and balanced and what types of hitches to use. 

Dutch Oven Cooking – Trail Encampment – Saturday at 9 a.m.

Come and eat some pastry for breakfast!  Learn how to use a Dutch oven and what you can cook in it while packing out with your horses or in your own backyard!

Amanda Love

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Amanda is the Horsemanship Director at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas. She is the coach of the Intercollegiate Horse Show Team there and also teaches numerous classes. Amanda is currently on the CHA Board of Directors and is an active rider and does cross fit.

Jumping Exercises – Indoor Arena – Friday at 1:30 p.m.

This session will be great for those just starting to teach jumping as well as those that have been coaching this discipline for a while. Come and join us to see different flatwork exercises, ground pole drills and jumping gymnastics and courses to help your riders succeed.

 

Jordan Manfredi

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Jordan Manfredi, MBA joins us from Purdue University Calumet, where she spent two years as a continuing lecturer in equine business management, marketing, promotion and sales within their School of Business. Currently, Jordan is the president of Big Red Advisory Group, an equine consulting group whose clients include Intrepid International, a global equine product distributor and Horse Tack Co., a leading e-commerce retailer. Furthermore, Jordan teaches equine business management at LIU-Post in Long Island, New York. Jordan, an avid hunter/jumper rider of 26 years has consulted for various national and international equine companies and has presented at several trade shows and conferences, including the United States Pony Club National Meeting and Hoosier Horse Expo.

Marketing that Works! – Classroom – Saturday 1:30 p.m. 

Tired of marketing tactics that don’t produce ROI? Are you throwing away valuable marketing dollars? Are you looking to grow your business but not sure how? Well then, let’s go back to the basics to create a plan that works. This seminar will teach you how to: Outline and intimately understand your target market; develop a SWOT analysis that highlights your Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats; create SMARTS goals that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Timely and Sustainable; measure success and ROI; and implement tried and true marketing tactics that won’t break the bank. We will also brainstorm marketing ideas and share success stories. Furthermore, you will be given the opportunity to start a marketing plan and to discuss one on one any marketing questions you may have.

 

Jim McDonald

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Jim is a lifelong horseman and a lifelong learner.  In the year 2000, he started a non-profit organization dedicated to horsemanship education.  Part of its mission is to make the joy of a relationship with a horse available to people who would not ordinarily have that opportunity and that was the original motivation for founding the Graham Equestrian center (www.Grahameq.org).  They work closely with anyone who wants to advance their horsemanship skills and knowledge.  Jim is currently the CHA Board Treasurer and an AQHA Professional Horseman.

Horsemanship Through Principles of Behavioral Science and Learning Theory – Classroom – Friday at 1:30 p.m. 

 

Ed Montana

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From the polka dance halls of the Midwest with his father’s band at age 10, to the Alps of Europe singing songs about Texas and dang near every PRCA Rodeo in between, Ed is a busy man. Traveling with the original Coors Cowboy Band, Ed has been very lucky to have traveled all over the beautiful USA doing what he loves most… playing music.

Cowboy Welcome to Texas – Coors Cowboy Club – Thursday at 2 p.m.

 

Terry Myers

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Terry is a leading trainer, teacher and national clinician, but above all he is a true horseman. Myers has trained stock and hunter horses for state, national and world competition. But he doesn’t just train the show horse. His training is for all horses regardless of the discipline. He incorporates work with both horse and rider to achieve balanced movements. His Ride-in-Sync® philosophy helps riders understand how body position affects horse performance. Through Myers’ 45 years of experience and work with thousands of horses and riders, he has developed coaching and demonstration methods which provides logical information that is easily understood and put to use. Consistent feedback from clinic attendees is confirmation that Terry’s training ideology and teaching style produces results.

How Shoulder Control Affects Performance – Indoor Arena – Friday at 3 p.m.

More than anything else, having your horse soft and square in their shoulders improves performance. A horse must be square in their shoulders in order to be able lift their back and drive with their hind end. If they are not square in their shoulders, the hind end has no place to go and they end up with their hocks out in their tail. Terry will show how the rider can lift and square the horse’s shoulders as part of softness and collection. With his instruction, this will be accomplished through rider body position and putting the horse into a correct frame. No matter what the discipline, shoulder control impacts performance. 

 

National Cutting Horse Association

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Come and ride a trained cutting horse on a flag with local professional trainers during this session. On May 1, 1946, the National Cutting Horse Association was formed by a group of cowboys and ranchers with the main goals of promoting cutting competition, standardizing contest rules, and preserving the cutting horse’s western heritage. NCHA held its first cutting in Dublin, Texas, in September 1946. The ensuing decades have afforded tremendous growth for the NCHA, and today, more than 2,200 shows are held annually with total prize money exceeding $36 million.

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Ride a Cutter – Indoor Arena – Friday at Noon

 

National Reining Horse Association

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First offered in 2010 at the Alltech© FEI World Equestrian Games in Lexington, Ky., “NRHA Ride a Reiner” has taken the country by storm by giving novice and experienced riders the opportunity to ride a reining horse. Nowhere else in the world can spectators find an option like this: the chance to receive a hands-on lesson from an NRHA Professional, to enjoy a dizzying spin and to feel the power of sliding stops on a well-trained reining horse!

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Ride a Reiner – Indoor Arena – Saturday at Noon 

 

Valerie Ormond

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Following a 25-year career leading as a naval officer, Valerie dedicated her time to promoting the horse industry and sharing lessons learned. Her two award-winning novels, “Believing In Horses” and “Believing In Horses, Too,” highlight rescues, competition, equine-assisted therapies, military families, and the healing power of horses. Valerie blended education, advocacy, and inspiration into stories that also introduce readers to real-life organizations which have since gained recognition in the form of grants, fundraisers, publicity, new volunteers, and political acknowledgement. Valerie founded Veteran Writing Services, LLC, and is a charter member of the first National Women Veterans Speakers Bureau, being named one of the Top 101 Leadership Speakers in 2015. A Certified Horsemanship Association instructor in both English and Western, she rides and competes in the National Capital Adult Equestrian League, and serves as Secretary of the Maryland Horse Council.  You can reach Valerie at http://BelievingInHorses.com/

Leading Beyond the Saddle – Classroom – Friday at 10:30 a.m.

You may be the most influential leader in your students’ lives. What lessons do you want to impart in the time you are with them? And how? You have a larger impact than you realize in the horse industry beyond your individual role at a barn, within a discipline, or in a lesson program — and communication is key. Come to this interactive session to discover ways to mentor, motivate, and lead our next generation of horse enthusiasts to help them achieve their goals.

 

John Pipkin

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John is currently the Director of the Equine Industry Program and a Regents Professor of Animal Science at West Texas A&M University where his duties include coaching the Horse Judging Team, and overseeing the Equestrian and Stock Horse Teams, in addition to teaching, research, and administrative responsibilities. He has been an approved judge for over 20 years, and currently has judge’s cards with the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), American Paint Horse Association (APHA), National Reining Horse Association (NRHA), National Snaffle Bit Association (NSBA), National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA), and World Conformation Horse Association (WCHA).  He has judged over 400 total shows in 10 different countries and 33 states including 7 AQHA World, 4 APHA World, 3 International Championships, and other major AQHA, APHA, NRHA and NSBA shows.  Pipkin’s judging teams have won 120 (99 at WTAMU) National or World Champion or Reserve Champion titles including the 2013 and 2014 AQHA Collegiate World and NRHA Championships; and Equestrian Teams under his program direction have won 41 National Champion or Reserve Champion titles, including the 2013 IHSA Western National Champion team.  He has trained and shown professionally in Halter, Reining, Working Cow Horse, Western Pleasure, Western Riding, and Trail, as well as these and other classes as a youth exhibitor.  He is a National Director for AQHA, currently serves on the AQHA and WCHA Judges Committees, and has served as Chair of the AQHA Show and Professional Horsemen Committee, and the AQHA Show Council. Dr. Pipkin has been awarded the Outstanding Young Professional Award by the Equine Science Society and the Texas 4-H Alumni Award.  At WT, he has received the Magister Optimus award, the university’s highest faculty recognition.  The Texas A&M University System awarded him the Teaching Excellence Award, and named him a Regents Professor.   

West Texas A&M University Welcome – CHA Annual Meeting – Thursday 

 

Sanna Roling

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Sanna is a life member of CHA devoting her talents as a Level 3 English and Level 2 Western Instructor to horsemanship for people with disabilities and youth-at-risk.  A past or present member of several committees including the Instructor Manual, Standards, and IRD, Sanna has devoted much of her CHA life to IRD and today runs Dream Catcher Stables, Inc in Houston, TX.  A Special Olympics Equestrian Coach (1995 World Games Coach from Texas), Path Int’l Registered Instructor, Certified Texas Special Education and Math Teacher, Sanna also played an instrumental part in creating the Top Hands Horse Show (Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo) which was duplicated by Ft. Worth, TX (Chisolm Challenge) and Austin, TX (Golden Stirrup).  In 26 years her athletes (298) have brought home 264 firsts, 282 seconds, 224 thirds, 188 fourths, 148 fifths 99 sixths, 151 honorable mentions.  

Teaching Riders with Disabilities in a Recreational Riding Program – Classroom – Friday at 3 p.m. 

Share in the abilities of people with autism, traumatic brain injury, Down Syndrome, complex traumatic stress disorder, Cerebral Palsy, paraplegia, amputation and hip replacement, visual impairment, hearing impairment, mental retardation, and anxiety disorder.  Be part of a discussion including teaching strategies and challenges, reasons why these athletes chose the equestrian sport, and advantages gained.

 

Darla Ryder 

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Darla started at the age of eight with bareback and western riding and in her early twenties spent time overseas under the tillage of an instructor with the BHS (British Horse Society). Her career with horses has been varied in both breeds and disciplines. She has raised and shown Quarter, Arabian, Appaloosa, Miniatures and Gypsy Horses. Darla has successfully served as a trainer, facility/equine manager for a hunter/jumper barn, a cutting horse facility and as the Executive Director for a Therapeutic Riding Center. She currently schools horses for clients, teaches able bodied riders as well as riders with special needs and travels as a mentors for various equine programs. She has been with CHA since 1995 and is certified at the Master and Clinician level in Standard Certification, Instructors of Riders with Disabilities, Facilities Management and Vaulting Coach Certification. She is also a certified instructor with PATH. Darla has presented mounted and classroom presentation, clinics and workshops nationwide and was the first recipient in 2003 of the coveted  “CHA Clinic Instructor of the Year.” 

ABC’s of the Human/Horse Relationship – East Pen – Friday at 3 p.m. 

This workshop is a must for anyone who owns or works with horses. With over fifty years of equine experience and the mentorship as a girl of a retired cavalryman, these techniques Darla shares, work! Using the knowledge of how horses communicate with each other it will teach you, how to communicate with a horse in his own language. Gaining this knowledge and adapting it in your ground handling techniques bring about a true partnership between human and horse. Confidence and trust on both sides! This method of handling and training makes for the perfect personal or school horse.  A horse that willingly follows with the leader between the nose and shoulder on a loose lead, a horse that is quiet and willing, No special equipment is needed or used. 

 

Jochen Schleese

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Jochen documented over 34 years of his experience as German Certified Master Saddler and Saddle Ergonomist in his books ‘Suffering in Silence – The Saddle Fit Link to Physical and Psychological trauma in Horses’ (2013), ‘The Silent Killer’ (2012) and DVD ’Beyond the 9 Points of Saddle Fit’.

Saddle Fit Issue that Affect Comfort, Performance and Even Soundness – Classroom – Friday at 9 a.m.
Identifying and Correcting Saddle Fit Issues to Horse and to Rider – East Pen – Friday at 1:30 p.m. 

 

Tom Scrima 

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Tom serves as a board member of the American Competitive Trail Horse Association, a 501 c3 nonprofit. During his high school and college years Tom earned his tuition and spending money training horses and giving riding lessons. It wasn’t until meeting his future bride, while both were instructing at a summer camp, that he realized he really didn’t know much about riding so he took a back seat to her Intercollegiate Collegiate All American status and focused in on business during his later years at the University of Notre Dame. He then went on to obtain an Advanced Degree from DMAA in Direct Marketing.

How to Take Your Horse Business to the Next Level with Little to No Dollar Outlay- The Economics of Economical Marketing – Classroom – Saturday at 1:30 p.m.

We have all heard that you have about 2 seconds to capture the reader or you are out of there! In the horse industry we are all so busy with our passion and jobs that that’s probably a generous estimate! In this session find out the true cost of “free” emailing, true cost of snail mail, if digital and hard print pay off, how do you survive with a virtually zero marketing budget, and find out how to sell the sizzle. We will also discuss stories of Ed Maher…the greatest marketing genius ever and founder of the DMAA…a man who tuned pennies to hundred dollar bills…from a wheel chair and will provide you with a summary of cost free approaches to let new customers know you are ready for them.

 

Dennis Sigler 

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Dennis is a Professor and Extension Horse Specialist in the Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University.  Dr. Sigler received a B.S. degree from Abilene Christian University, a M.S. degree from Texas Tech and his Ph.D. degree from Texas A&M.  From 1980 to 1989 he was the leader of the equine teaching and research program at Kansas State University.  For the 15 years prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M in 2006, Dr. Sigler was employed in the livestock feed industry as a nutritionist and sales director.  He has done nutrition, formulation, sales and marketing work for a total of 6 different feed companies.    In addition to extension education activities, Dr. Sigler conducts research and trains graduate students in the area of exercise science and nutrition.  Specifically, he is interested in conditioning and management of the juvenile and mature athletic horse to maximize performance and enhance structural integrity.  Other areas of interest include nutritional strategies to enhance performance and reduce musculo-skeletal injuries.  Dr. Sigler has served as President of the Equine Science Society, has published numerous scientific and popular press articles and has served as an invited speaker at many national and state-wide meetings.  He is a member of the American Society of Animal Science and the Equine Science Society. Dr. Sigler has a lifetime of practical horse experience.  He has been an AQHA-approved judge for 33 years and has judged horse shows in nearly every state and in 5 foreign countries.  He is also an accomplished horseman, having shown and trained horses for a variety of performance events, including cutting, reining and cow horse.  He was a founding member and Past-President of the Stock Horse of Texas Association and the American Stock Horse Association.  He currently serves on the Executive Board and is Immediate Past-President of the Texas Quarter Horse Association. 

Energetics for the Performance Horse – Classroom – Saturday at 10:30 a.m. 

 

Cheryl West

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Cheryl is a Master CHA Instructor for English, Western, Therapeutic and Jumping, and a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship certified instructor and mentor.  She specializes in infusing dressage and biomechanics into all riding disciplines and developing instructors. Owns and operates West Equestrian Ranch in Sand Springs Oklahoma, teaching lessons to over 60+ riders a week at her ranch as well as Stillwater, Broken Arrow, Edmond, Stigler and more. She often travels certifying instructors, mentoring and teaching clinics. Serves on the board for Great Plains Dressage Chapter, Oklahoma Dressage Chapter board, the CHA development for Instructors for Riders with Disabilities committee, and in process of helping other groups start up.  She was the program manager for American Therapeutic Center, with 70+ riders, for 5 years. She strives to use to encourage riders and people from all walks of life that upper level equitation can be achieved no matter what discipline, horse or income. 

Connected Riding – East Pen – Friday at 10:30 a.m. 

Connected riding would focus on the rider and their ability to clearly communicate to the horse. Many times we spend a lot of energy trying to fix the horse, without realizing that what we do in the saddle, and how we ride affects much of their response. This includes fear and tension.  We use biomechanics and connection to help us be more aware of our bodies.

 

Melanie Wilhelm

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Melanie Wilhelm of Wilhelm Performance Horses is located in Nazareth, Texas. A NRHA Professional, Melanie has a current NRHA Lifetime Earnings of more than $34,400. Her accomplishments include many great accolades including a 2011 Open Derby finalist, 2012 NRHA Professional Horse Woman of the Year, and multiple AQHA World Show qualifications. From the round pen to the show pen, Wilhelm Performance Horses specializes in producing reining horses of the highest caliber as well as developing youth and non pro riders.

Getting Your Students Involved with Reining – Indoor Arena – Saturday at 10:30 a.m. 

Melanie will teach you how to implement simple reining based exercises into your lesson program to keep your beginner students involved while giving them goals for success!

 

JoAnne Young 

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JoAnne has been teaching riding and training horses for over 40 years, and is happy that she is still learning.  Every student and every horse bring fresh challenges that keep life interesting.  She has been privileged and blessed beyond her wildest dreams to study with such wonderful instructors as Walter Zettl (dressage coach to Canadian event team when they won bronze at Los Angeles Olympics), Bertin Potter in Germany,  Molly Sivewright (FEI judge and past chair of the Fellows of the British Horse Society), Carel Eijkenaar (FEI judge), Eddo Hoestra (F.E.I. Trainer) and Doris Halstead (Physical Therapist and author of “Releasing the Potential: Physical Therapy Modalities for Horse and Rider.”  Jo-Anne is the author of the M.A. thesis:  “Preparing students for riding instructor certification through college curricula.”

Lateral Work Defined – East Pen – Saturday at 10:30 a.m. 

What to Expect During a CHA Certification Clinic

The Certified Horsemanship Association’s Certification Clinic season is currently under way for those who want to get certified or renew a certification as a riding instructor, camp staff, equestrian program staff, a vaulting or driving instructor, and/or a therapeutic riding instructor. Certification is valid for three years, at which time, a Certified Instructor must provide documentation of 25 hours of continuing education and proof of work in the industry. In order to raise the level of certification, instructors must attend another certification clinic.

Various clinics are currently offered in 20 states and two Canadian provinces (Manitoba and Ontario), and new clinics are added to the schedule throughout the year. Certification offers a variety of benefits, not only for the certified individual, but also for their employer, program manager, and clients/students. To learn more about the various benefits, read CHA’s blog post, “Why You Should Find a Certified Riding Instructor” at http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/why_a_certified_instructor.html.

For those who are already registered for a Certification Clinic, we’re going to take a look at how the clinic is structured and how to prepare for your certification clinic and evaluations.

The Certification Clinic Structure
In a nutshell, a CHA Certification Clinic is a multi-day (usually 4- to 5-day) intensive clinic held at a CHA Program Member host site. Each clinic attendee must attend at least 40 mandatory hours during the clinic, pass written tests, teach at least four practice lessons, undergo a riding evaluation under two CHA Certified Clinicians (and fellow attendees), and attend at least five in-depth workshops on risk management, teaching techniques, professionalism, and herd management.

The purpose of the clinic is to evaluate a participant to see if they can teach at the level they would like to get certified at and to see if their instruction is “safe, effective, and fun.” To achieve certification, a candidate must meet Certification Competency Guidelines, and certification is determined by two Clinic Staff. Certification at any level is never guaranteed, and sometimes an attendee’s skills may not be up to par to achieve a certification at the clinic.

There are four levels that instructors can achieve in flatwork in English and/or Western and in jumping. Those who do not jump can still become certified at all four levels on the flat. Clinic staff at the host site set the schedule, but it can be modified during the clinic due to unforeseen circumstances, such as bad weather.

Those who are certified as an Assistant Instructor are allowed to help another CHA Instructor during lessons and rides in English and/or Western, but they must be at least 16 years old by the last day of their certification clinic. CHA Instructors must be 18 by the last day of the clinic.

Level 1 Instructor: This involves arena riding in either English or western, and there is a strong emphasis on safety and group control. A CHA Level 1 Instructor teaches introductory skills, such as walk, trot, stop, start, and steer, along with ground lessons.

Level 2 Instructor: This level instructor may teach weekly riding lessons or day camps. A CHA Level 2 Instructor teaches improved balance, cueing, and control, with riders learning diagonals, patterns, trail riding, and progressing to a canter or lope and possibly pre-jumping exercises.

Level 3 Instructor: This level instructor helps a rider improve their form, style, and use of aids and places more emphasis on horsemanship theory and horse care. This can include exercises such as getting the correct lead, improving control of the canter, basic jumping, transitions, and school figures.

Level 4 Instructor: This level includes instructors who may be specialists in one breed or discipline. A Level 4 Instructor will teach flying lead changes, leg yields, and lateral work and may specialize in stadium jumping, cross-country jumping, dressage, or reining and horsemanship patterns. Advanced horsemanship theory and horse management is taught at this level.

Master Instructor (Level 4.4): A Master Instructor teaches both English and western at Level 4 and is highly experienced in a variety of teaching and management situations. There may be an increased focus on jumping.

For Master Instructors who would like to become CHA Certified Clinicians, the Clinic Instructors at their certification clinic can recommend them as an Assistant Clinic Instructor (ACI) or as a Clinic Instructor (CI). There are age requirements for these positions. An ACI can help others in the certification process at clinics. A CI is qualified to run a certification clinic and certify instructors along with another CI after they have been an ACI and worked at two different clinics in two different locations under two different clinic staff. All ACIs and Cis must be able to evaluate others correctly and be able to encourage others while also having the ability to give constructive comments in a kind manner.

To achieve certification, an attendee must be able to pass each level before they are evaluated at the next level. So even if you are a fabulous jumping instructor, you will not be tested on those skills until your skills teaching at Level 1 have been evaluated and confirmed. The first lesson will be at Level 1, and if you get become certified as a Level 4 Instructor, then CHA says that you are competent to teach at all the levels below that.

The 40 mandatory hours involves 20 hours in which attendees teach and ride in at least four sample riding lessons. Your skills as an instructor will be evaluated. When you don’t teach, you will be riding in other people’s lessons acting as a student. Three lessons are mounted, and one is a ground lesson. Each clinic has a minimum of five workshops. There may or may not be a skills evaluation section.

The Five Skill Areas

Two Clinic Staff evaluate your skills in five areas: safety, horsemanship, teaching skills, group control, and professionalism.

Safety: CHA emphasizes safety, and all instructors must maintain safety awareness at all times around students since students model behavior based on what the instructor does. To pass this category, you must score at least 7 out of 10. Attendees are evaluated on rules and procedures and that you can demonstrate and enforce those rules and procedures while showing leadership skills. Your personal safety habits must be spot on and you should be positive and calm in problem situations.

Horsemanship: This involves tack adjustment and fit, ground skills, riding ability, and knowledge of theory behind the skills. You must have horsemanship/riding skills at one level above the level you become certified to teach. The riding evaluation includes mounting and dismounting, riding at a walk, trot, and canter or lope on the correct lead with control and proper form.

Teaching Skills: Clinic staff will look at your preparation, your organization of material, and your utilization of resources while teaching. During your practice lessons, you must present appropriate material creatively and clearly, identify problems, and be able to find solutions to those problems. You must be able to effectively evaluate lessons, situations, and people.

Group Control: This evaluates voice projection, communication (eye contact, age appropriate), control of a group in the riding arena and possibly on the trail (if that is part of the clinic), and that you use your Assistant Instructors effectively.

Professionalism: You will be evaluated on how you implement the CHA Standards, whether you are professional in appearance and presentation and mature and consistent with a positive attitude, whether you have good interpersonal relationship skills, and respect and empathy for horses.

Your weakest area of evaluation will determine your level of certification. For instance, if you score at a Level 2 in group control, but score at a Level 4 in the other areas, you will be certified as a Level 2 Instructor. In addition, you may be certified at different levels for English and western.

Our tips in this blog come from CHA’s webinar, “Preparing for CHA Instructor Certification.” For more information on how to prepare for your evaluations, how your sample lessons are structured and what is being evaluated, and the clinic as a whole, you can watch the free webinar above or on CHA’s YouTube Channel. The webinar is a must-see video if you are headed to a certification clinic.

Embed the video: <iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/GuhOm8YjGyI” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

If you aren’t already registered, now may be the time to book your trip and register for a Certification Clinic if you live near or can travel to one of the following states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington. To learn more about the various certifications, please visit .

CHA has been certifying riding instructors for more than 45 years and is the largest certifying organization in North America. For more information on attending a CHA Certification Clinic, please visit . For questions, please call CHA in Lexington, KY, at 859-259-3399 or email info@cha-ahse.org.

Why Becoming Accredited is Important for Equestrian Programs and Facilities

By Sarah Evers Conrad

Whether you run an equestrian facility of any kind or are seeking one out for riding lessons, camp, board, or training for your horse, site accreditation should be on your mind. The Certified Horsemanship Association Site Accreditation Program is a program that allows equine facilities to get a designation from CHA that states they have met certain standards for quality, effectiveness, and safety set forth within the CHA Standards for Equestrian Programs manual.

A variety of equestrian programs and facilities can apply for accreditation. These include lesson programs, camps with horses*, colleges, schools, private or public boarding or training operations, recreational riding programs, driving programs, vaulting programs, programs for riders with disabilities*, trail ride operations, and outfitters. Every facility that applies for Accreditation will be meticulously inspected by two trained CHA Site Visitors who will go through every standard to ensure compliance.

CHA Accreditation covers three main areas: the facility itself, how the program operates, and the program’s management. The standards set forth guidelines for:

  • Safe grooming and tacking areas
  • Arena and trail construction and maintenance
  • Safe and humane areas for animals
  • Emergency plans
  • Staff qualifications
  • Program policies and procedures
  • Director qualifications
  • Horse selection
  • And so much more

The CHA site accreditation program is a well-established program that CHA consistently seeks to improve. Since accreditation is only available to CHA Business/Program Members, these members receive all of the Business/Program Membership benefits, as we discussed in the blog last time. http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/business_membership_benefits.html

However, accreditation status also offers additional benefits, for both the facility and the customers considering that facility. The benefits below make it worthwhile for programs and facilities to become CHA Accredited. Let’s look at how CHA Site Accreditation helps these two parts of the horse industry.

Benefits of CHA Site Accreditation

CHA Accreditation helps facilities and equine programs to:

Strive for Excellence The Standards for Equestrian Programs manual was developed by experts from equestrian programs, insurance providers, equine industry professionals, and legal consultants. These experts created a document with the highest standards possible for quality and safety. Those facilities who want to strive for excellence must meet 100% of the mandatory standards and 80% of the recommended standards. In addition, certain specialized equine programs—such as driving, vaulting, or programs for riders with disabilities—may have additional standards they need to meet. CHA Accreditation helps programs develop high standards and a consistent way of doing things effectively and safely.

Assure the Public That They Care About Their Customers – One of the main goals of the accreditation program was to help the public select equine programs that meet industry-accepted standards. Meeting industry standards for safety and quality allows an equine program to show customers that they care about their participants’ safety, horse welfare, and the quality of service they are providing. It signals to potential customers that the business at-hand is willing to be scrutinized and held to high standards of their own choice. However, even if a business followed all of the standards, it doesn’t mean that an accident can’t happen. We all know there is an inherent risk in working with large animals with a mind of their own. However, facilities that have met accreditation standards are committed to reducing that risk and promoting safety each and every day.

Provide a System of Accountability and Credibility – Accreditation allows parents, grandparents, and other guardians to put their trust in the accredited equine program that has a system of accountability and credibility behind it. The accredited facility has shown that it will go to great lengths to meet set safety standards, is willing to be evaluated, and has passed the inspection of professional CHA Site Visitors who inspect the facility for compliance of each and every standard. Businesses set themselves above other potential businesses under consideration by a parent or guardian by voluntarily applying for and meeting industry standards set forth by an international organization that focuses on safety, effectiveness, and quality.

Improve the Industry as a Whole – It behooves all of us to raise the level of programs available within the equine industry. This allows us to have better lesson programs, better care for our horses, top-notch training and competition programs, better horse camps, etc. As facilities raise their standards to meet an international accreditation like that provided by CHA, then it benefits all participants. As is written in the Introduction, the “Standards for Equestrian Programs is offered for the benefit, safety, and improvement of the equine industry and the clients and horses it serves.”

Meet Customer Demand – In today’s market, the consumer has many options for almost anything they desire. And today’s consumer has learned how to do research, especially thanks to the internet, to find the best business that will meet their needs. Most consumers want a high-quality product or service, and CHA Accreditation signals to potential customers that a business has met high standards. In addition, since the US government does not regulate equine facilities, YET, having businesses meet standards set by the industry becomes even more important. And if the US government does decide to regulate the equine industry down the road, the framework will already be in place for those businesses that already have CHA Site Accreditation.

Market Themselves More Effectively – If an equine business markets themselves as CHA Accredited and lets potential customers know the importance of that designation, they have then set themselves above their competition in the market. It becomes especially important if there is another accredited facility within a particular market. For if the competitor is CHA Accredited and another is not, then the business that is not may see a decline in business as customers choose another facility. Accredited facilities should make sure to use the CHA logo on all advertising, letterheads, displays, and marketing materials. In addition, the CHA Site Accreditation sign can be displayed on the property. Those programs that are accredited are also promoted through CHA, such as in the database of certified riding instructors and accredited facilities at www.CHAInstructors.com.

Demonstrate Professionalism – It is another way for a business to show that it is professionally run. One of the main reasons CHA Site Accreditation is offered is to educate facility owners and program operators on how to manage key areas of their programs, especially in the areas of safety. For a facility to be accredited, it must have written policies that meet standards set forth in the manual. These policies allows program management to develop its program how it wants to operate, maintains consistency, assists with training staff, clarifies the responsibilities of the staff, and encourages safety and good business practices.

CHA believes that facilities and individuals striving to follow the standards set forth in the manual promote a safer environment for equine activities. Even if your equine program is already striving and meeting the safety standards set forth in the Standards for Equestrian Programs manual, you may think, why do I need to become accredited? Let me ask you, why not? CHA Accreditation is like earning the “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval.”

For more information on what is required for accreditation, how the process works, or to apply, please visit the Site Accreditation section of the CHA website.

CHA Site Accreditation

To purchase the CHA Standards for Equestrian Programs manual, please visit the CHA Store Online or call 859-259-3399.

Why Becoming Accredited is Important for Equestrian Programs and Facilities

* Please Note: If a camp or a program for riders with disabilities is not CHA Accredited, it may hold an accreditation through the American Camp Association (ACA) or the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) International. While these programs are different from CHA Accreditation, they do provide similar benefits. In addition, a facility with accreditation status from ACA or PATH can also apply for CHA Site Accreditation if they so choose.

Information not to Include:

For a CHA Business/Program Member to earn their Site Accreditation, they must be a member in good standing, fill out the application for Site Accreditation, and then pay their CHA Site Accreditation fees and the travel expenses for two CHA Site Visitors to come to the facility for a visit, which is usually during business hours. In addition, the business must create a self-assessment notebook using the Standards for Equestrian Programs manual. Any concerns should be addresses, staff and volunteers should receive additional training if necessary, and this should also be documented. In addition, any maintenance or upgrades should be completed before the site inspection. It is time to put your best foot, and hooves, forward.

During the site inspection, a member of management usually gives a tour of the facility to the Site Visitors and be the person of contact throughout the day. Then the Site Visitors will start verification of each standard, making notes along the way. They do not determine accreditation status. This is done after the Site Visitors send in all their information and notes by the CHA Program Director, who is an official CHA staff member. The site is scored, and if it meets all the requirements, then staff will receive the accreditation certificate, a CHA Accredited Site outdoor sign, and other accreditation materials. The facility must continue compliance with the standards and submit written documentation every year and also inform CHA of any major changes to the facility.

If the site is denied, management can re-apply after six months, or if necessary, an appeal can be made to the CHA Grievance Committee.

2014 CHA International Conference Speakers

Patricia Bona, D.C.

Dr. Bona received her post-graduate Doctor of Chiropractic in 1987 From Logan College of Chiropractic in Chesterfield, MO. Along with her office in Blue Bell, PA for humans, Dr. Pat has been certified in animal chiropractic by American Veterinary Chiropractic Association (AVCA) since 1994. She is an avid equestrian and horse owner who started in 4-H. Her focus has always been on good posture which must start from the feet up to efficiently thrive under unyielding force of gravity; a basic yet powerful concept. As a result of Doctor Bona’s focus, she developed the Cross Fiber grooming technique in 1997 (Posture Prep Cross Fiber Grooming). A technique of daily grooming that empowers the horse owner as they help to improve the horse’s posture, performance and well-being, with a pre-ride evaluation and massage as they groom. All the while learning that “Posture is the Language of the Horse.”

Assess and Address the Horse’s Myofascial and Postural Imbalances – KHP Club Lounge – Saturday at 3 p.m.

For the past few years Dr. Bona has been seriously focusing on the evaluation of aberrant posture and biomechanics due to scars/scar tissue. Dents, dings, white hairs, areas of hair loss are areas of “healed” injuries with significant restriction that need to be released. All too often they are completely overlooked or thought of as a blemish. This lecture provides profound observations and tools for the novice horse owner to the performance veterinarian.

Shellie Carmoney

Shellie relocated to central Iowa in March of 2014 after she accepted the position of Equestrian Program Specialist at the Jester Park Equestrian Center in Granger. While much of her time is spent designing programs, organizing events and the professional development of instructors, staff and volunteers, Shellie also balances her time in the busy program. She facilitates the At-Risk Youth program, oversees the Department of Corrections stable hands, develops program and therapy horses and teaches multiple levels of students in the able body and therapeutic horsemanship programs. Her philosophy is teaching the “total horse” regardless of the discipline, ability or background of her students. Shellie lives in Johnston, Iowa with her sister, their crazy Maltise dog and her horse, Aragorn.

Riding Instructor Challenge – Covered Arena – Saturday at 4:30 p.m.

Come and watch while CHA Instructors battle it out to see who can teach a brand new rider the best! It is like the Mustang Make Over and other challenges that you see at Expos except with a CHA flair! May the Best Instructor Win!

Patti Colbert

Patti is a “hands-on” promoter for the horse industry. Experience in both private and non-profit equine business led Patti to a position as the Senior Director of the American Quarter Horse Association’s Foundation where she served until 2004. In 2006 Patti’s company began a management arrangement with the Mustang Heritage Foundation, funded in part through Bureau of Land Management grants. Colbert created and launched the Extreme Mustang Makeover events and other Mustang training programs which led to the adoption of more than 5,000 wild horses. Patti currently works with the American Horse Council’s Marketing Alliance, representing major equine breed, discipline and corporate organizations. Patti helped to create “Time to Ride” events and programs including the national “100 Day Horse Challenge” designed to provide incentives for stables, businesses and organizations to host events that connect newcomers to horses.

Keynote – Saturday 7 p.m. – Awards Banquet – Marriott Griffin Gate

Generational Differences and How They Can Affect Your Riding Program

Bob Coleman Ph. D., PAS, Dip.ACAN

Dr. Coleman grew up in western Canada and has had a lifelong interest in horses. He is a graduate of the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor’s degree in Agriculture with a major in Animal Sciences and a Master’s of Science degree. After graduating, Coleman worked in the Canadian Feed Industry as a nutritionist for two major feed companies. In 1980, he moved to Alberta, Canada to be the Extension Horse Specialist for Alberta Agriculture. During his time in Alberta, he completed his Ph.D. with a focus in Equine Nutrition. Dr. Coleman then moved to the University of Kentucky as the Equine Extension Specialist. In addition to his Extension duties, Dr. Coleman teaches in the Equine Science and Management program and serves as the program’s Director of Undergraduate Studies. Dr. Coleman is a member of the AQHF research committee and is the current president of the Kentucky Quarter Horse Association. Professionally, Dr. Coleman is a member of the Equine Science Society where he serves as the executive director, American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists, and the American Society of Animal Scientists as well as a board member for CHA.

Feed Costs – KHP Club Lounge – Friday at 3 p.m.

When managing any group of horses trying to control feed costs is always something that owners struggle with. When prices are low, and who can remember when that was, it is not such an issue but with the way hay and grain prices bounce around having some ideas on how to manage feeding programs to help control costs is always something worth talking about. It is not just about controlling feed intakes, but making sure the feeding programs for your horses meet their needs and do not break the bank. This presentation will discuss some ideas on maintaining costs while making sure your horses are receiving the feed they need. Krishona Martinson, PhD from the University of Minnesota, was also an author for this presentation.

Managing Your Horse’s Weight – KHP Club Lounge – Saturday at 10:30 a.m.

For many horse owners knowing how much their horses weigh can be a great help in managing their feeding programs and administering medications. While some use an old equation that used heart girth and body length there is a newer equation that includes a few more measurements but may give a better indication of how much the horse weighs. In addition you can use some of the measurements to determine what your horse’s ideal weight should be. All in all horse owners can get an estimate of how much the horse weighs, what it should weigh and how are you doing. This all comes in an app for your smart phone. This presentation will look at is your horse fat? Well there is an app for that.

Kathy Findley

Kathy is a licensed judge for numerous national level judging cards. She has officiated at regional and national level breed shows. Kathy’s amateur and youth clients have achieved regional and national championships in numerous divisions including Halter, Showmanship, Equitation, Horsemanship, Hunter under Saddle, Western Pleasure, Trail, Sport Horse in Hand and Dressage. Serving as the chair of the WSHC (WI State Horse Council) Judges Committee, she has been instrumental in improving the Judging Standards. Kathy implemented the WSHC Judges – Evaluation Form and introduced the WSHC “Judge of the Year” Program. Ms. Findley is the author of WI’s First Judging & Showing Guidelines. She is a regular columnist for WI Judges Quarterly Update and has written numerous articles for other equestrian publications, including “Horse Sense”.

Here Comes the Judge! – KHP Club Lounge – Friday at 1:30 p.m.

Do you have what it takes to be a successful judge? What goes on in the mind of a horse show judge? Judging horse shows is much harder work than you might think. There are some very definite skills required. It is the judge’s opinion that sets our goals for the future. Join Kathy and learn what it takes to become a judge and what to expect.

Judging Hands On – Covered Arena Annex – Saturday at 1:30 p.m.

Have you ever wanted to be a “Judge” at a horse show? Join us ring side and you can participate in judging a class. We will score, evaluate and review the class and placings. You will need paper and a pen.

Tammi Gainer

Having grown up around horses, Tammi began her professional equine career in 1989 as a trail guide at a large ranch camp where she was first exposed to the world of equestrian vaulting and attended her first CHA Standard Instructor Certification Clinic. In the spring of 1995 Tammi joined the instructor staff at Pegasus Farm. While working at the Farm part-time and home schooling her three children, Tammi also spent much time working under several trainers in both reining and dressage and achieved PATH Intl. instructor certification. In 2000, she achieved CHA Master Level Instructor and clinic staff status and has since earned Clinic Instructor status in the Instructors of Riders with Disabilities (IRD) and Vaulting Coach programs as well. Since 1998 Tammi has been the head coach of the Pegasus Vaulting Club; an eighteen member recreational team that performs demonstrations and workshops at various venues throughout Ohio. In 2005 Tammi was promoted to Equestrian Director where she now manages all aspects of the equestrian program. Most recently Tammi has achieved Equine Specialist in Mental Health & Learning certification through PATH Intl and AQHA (American Quarter Horse Association) Professional Horseman. In September 2007 Tammi was elected to the CHA Board of Directors and asked to chair the Education & Training Committee & in 2011 was asked to take on the position of Board Secretary. Tammi is the 2011 CHA Volunteer of the Year.

Teaching Tips for Working with Riders with Autism, ADD and ADHD – Marriott Hotel – Thursday at 3:30 p.m.

There are many recognized instructional methods used by schools that can be translated into the riding arena. This workshop will look at those methods of learning and discuss in detail how they can be used to teach horsemanship to students with Autism, ADD, & ADHD.

Vaulting Exercises – Covered Annex Arena – Friday at 9 a.m.

This workshop is for anyone interested in the sport of vaulting from the very beginning to competition. This workshop will be bringing to the “barrel” how vaulting can be incorporated into a wide variety of programs. We will be covering topics such as equipment needs & use, training the vaulting horse, & the vaulting student. This will be a hands-on workshop so come in your tennis shoes & stretchy pants!

Maureen Gallatin

Maureen is best known for providing practical and spiritual encouragement to horse lovers, equipping them to make a difference through a connection with horses. Her unique brand of wisdom, humor and horsemanship is inspirational, and her warmth puts people at ease. She’s the founder of Inspired by Horses, an equestrian-focused Christian leadership, consulting, and inspirational publishing project, and of Amazing Women Inspired by Horses, which celebrates horsewomen and the many ways they are making a difference in the world. Maureen is founder of the International Center for Equestrian Ministry and author of the devotional called, “An Extra Flake.” She divides her time between Lexington, KY and Tryon, NC.

Teaching from a Faith-Based Perspective without Being Preachy – Marriott Hotel Roundtable talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

Lisa Harris

After graduating from Auburn University with a BS in Animal Science, Lisa received two degrees from the University of Kentucky: an MS in Vet Science, specializing in Equine Biomechanics and an MS in Physical Therapy. She has published an article on Equine Biomechanics in the Journal of Veterinary Science, and has presented in the US and Canada material from her MS Thesis. Lisa and her colleagues presented their MS PT Research Project comparing a human walking to sitting on a horse at the walk at the Ninth International Therapeutic Riding Congress in Denver in 1997. She currently practices physical therapy in an outpatient, private practice setting in Georgetown, Kentucky.  She is a Hippotherapy Clinical Specialist and a PATH, Intl Advanced Therapeutic Riding Instructor. Lisa initiated and coordinates the PATH, Intl accredited hippotherapy program at Central Kentucky Riding for Hope which is partnered with Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital. She teaches a hippotherapy lab each year at the University of Kentucky. Lisa is a graduate ‘A’ pony clubber. She has Evented through the Intermediate Two Star Level and has coached young riders through Preliminary Level.  Lisa is currently on the AHA, Inc. Board of Directors and holds the position of Education Chair.   She served on the AHA Board of Directors in the past holding 7 roles as the Research Chair and the editor of HIPPOTHERAPY magazine.

American Hippotherapy Association (EAAT) Marriott Hotel Roundtable Talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

KC Henry

KC Henry co-founded two therapeutic centers and also worked at Fieldstone Farm Therapeutic Riding Center where she was the first paid staff member of what was then a small all-volunteer program. During her 14 years at Fieldstone she moved from instructor to program director to Executive Director and under her leadership Fieldstone Farm completed a $4.5 million dollar campaign, built a state-of-the-art therapeutic riding facility, and developed a staff of 31 people that served 200 students with disabilities weekly. In 2006 she received the James Brady professional achievement award from the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl). She is now owner/principal at Transitions Unlimited, a 12 year old, rapidly growing consulting firm for nonprofit businesses. KC works with a large variety of nonprofit programs both nationally and internationally (including Turkey and South Africa). She specializes in project development, board development, strategic planning and start-up programs. One of her primary clients is the Horses and Humans Research Foundation – research focused on equine assisted activities.  KC is contracted as the foundation’s executive director.

What Science is Telling Us about Horses Impact on Humans – Club Lounge – Saturday at 9 a.m.

The Horses and Humans Research Foundation (HHRF) has been funding scientific investigation on the impact of horses on humans for 8 years now – the results of these studies are remarkable. The findings are showing us in scientific terms why, as Winston Churchill said, “Something about the outside of the horse is good for the inside of man.” HHRF has now funded scientific studies that measure the chemical changes of saliva when children who are abused or neglected participate in equine assisted activities. Why is that important? Not only could an increase in oxytocin, “the bonding hormone,” result in a feeling a wellbeing – it may coincide with relationship building to encourage children with attachment disorders to bond with their foster or adoptive care takers! Ability to bond changes lives. How about veterans with Post Traumatic Stress or Traumatic Brain Injuries? Anecdotal evidence is informing facilitators at more than 400 programs around the country that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptomatology decreases after participation in these programs. Now we are scientifically measuring participant’s experience of PTSD symptoms as well the intervention’s impact on coping skills, emotional regulation and social engagement. The world will soon know what Winston Churchill and horse lovers have always known. The scientific validation of the positive impact of horses on humans may change everything.

Teresa Kackert

Teresa has been CHA Clinic Instructor since 2003. She is also Chris Irwin Natural Horsemanship Certified and a Richard Shrake Resistance Free Riding Master Level Trainer/Instructor. Teresa is the creator of the ‘Soft Touch’ Training Program – Classical Equitation & Natural Horsemanship and has over 20 years professional experience as a rider, competitor, trainer, instructor, clinician and personal coach. She is founder of Great Horses of America, Consignment Horse Sales Company and Co-Founder of Pink Heart Pony Kids, Inc. Teresa specializes in: confidence building in both horse and rider, horse behavior modification, motivational personal coaching and skill enhancement for riders & horses of all levels and disciplines. www.GreatHorses.org.

Jumping Exercises – Covered Arena – Saturday at 9 a.m.

This jumping session will encompass the different seats such as the full seat and 2-point. The next step will involve an explanation of each seat and the reason for a change of seat at the walk, trot and canter. Ground poles will follow which will prepare the riders to ride the lines to and from the jumps thru poles in the trot and canter. The x-rails will be introduced demonstrating trotting using the 2-point to jump when starting out and then using a full seat while riding the canter. The next steps will be the verticals and negotiating the start of a course.

How to Teach Many Riders of Different Levels the Same Exercise at the Same Time – Covered Arena – Friday at 1:30 p.m.

This session will show instructors how to teach a solid group lesson even if you have a variety of levels within one class. Specific exercises will be discussed so that you can go back to your barn and use them!

Riding Instructor Challenge – Covered Arena – Saturday at 4:30 p.m.

Come and watch while CHA Instructors battle it out to see who can teach a brand new rider the best! It is like the Mustang Make Over and other challenges that you see at Expos except with a CHA flair! May the Best Instructor Win!

Roxanne Lawrence

Roxanne is the current Executive Director of the Interscholastic Equestrian Association, and she is an initial founding member of that association. Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, her equestrian experience started in the world of hunt seat riding. She spent several years as a trainer and instructor, and ultimately moved into horse show management with positions at The National Horse Show (Madison Square Garden), WEF, HITS, Capitol Challenge, 1996 Atlanta Olympics, and many other notable events around the country. She is currently on the American Youth Horse Council Board of Directors. She went on to manage the Andrews School Equestrian Center for 10 years in the Cleveland, Ohio area where she currently resides.

How Can my Equine Business Get Involved with the Interscholastic Equestrian Association – Marriott Hotel Roundtable talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

The Interscholastic Equestrian Association was founded in 2002. Just 10 years later, it boasts over 8,000 members who participate in two primary disciplines of Hunt Seat Equitation and Western Horsemanship/Reining. With its draw-based format, the IEA offers competitive opportunities to riders in grades 6-12 that may not own a horse, and it offers significant opportunities for growing your business and attracting new clientele to your lesson program. What are the benefits to your business and your clients?  How do you get involved? Come to this session to learn all about the Interscholastic Equestrian Association.

Amanda Love

Amanda is the Horsemanship Director at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas. She is the coach of the Intercollegiate Horse Show Team there and also teaches numerous classes. Amanda is currently on the CHA Board of Directors and is an active rider and does cross fit.

What is the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association and How Can I Get Involved? – Marriott Hotel Roundtable Talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

IHSA provides collegiate riders of all skills the opportunity to compete individually and as teams in equestrian competition. It was founded on the principle that any college student should be able to participate in horse shows regardless of his or her riding ability or financial status.

Simple Changes of Lead – Covered Arena – Friday at 3 p.m.

Come and learn how to get good lead changes with your students by doing these simple lead change exercises. Exercises that you can take home and start doing with your students right away will be explained.

Riding Instructor Challenge – Covered Arena – Saturday at 4:30 p.m.

Come and watch while CHA Instructors battle it out to see who can teach a brand new rider the best! It is like the Mustang Make Over and other challenges that you see at Expos except with a CHA flair! May the Best Instructor Win!

Jim McDonald

Jim is a lifelong horseman and a lifelong learner. In the year 2000, he started a non-profit organization dedicated to horsemanship education. Part of its mission is to make the joy of a relationship with a horse available to people who would not ordinarily have that opportunity and that was the original motivation for founding the Graham Equestrian center (www.Grahameq.org). They work closely with anyone who wants to advance their horsemanship skills and knowledge. Jim is currently the CHA Board Treasurer and an AQHA Professional Horseman.

Horse Training – What Every Horse Owner Should Know – Covered Arena Annex – Saturday at 9 a.m.

Understanding the principle of operant and instrumental conditioning as it applies to our interaction with the horse will greatly enhance the relationship we have with the horse. Understanding the popular phrases like, “Make the wrong thing difficult and the right thing easy”, and “reward the least little try” with an understanding of the scientific principles of behavior modification that will improve our understanding of how the horse learns. Your patience will expand which will lead to greater safety, effectiveness, and fun with our horses.

Jim McGarvey

Jim McGarvey is chairman of the 14,000 member Back Country Horsemen of America. The Back Country Horsemen, with chapters in 29 states are dedicated to “Keeping the Trails Open for All” on America’s public lands. Previously, Jim was cofounder and CEO of BenchMark Consulting International. His firm specialized in identifying and implementing world class best practices bank operations to major financial institutions on six continents. At age 28, Jim was instrumental in founding and being the Executive Director of Auction America Corporation. Auction America, one of whose important shareholders was Russ Jackson, is now part of the historical development of the Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Auctions as seen on the Speed Channel. Jim graduated from Wright State University with a degree in Political Science.

About Back Country Horsemen of America – Marriott Hotel Round Table Talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

Over 40 years ago, around a campfire in the Bob Marshall Wilderness of Northern Montana, the idea of the Back Country Horsemen of America was formed. That idea, then and now, is to keep the trails open for horses and mules and hikers – essentially, to keep the trails open for everyone. The BCHA accomplishes this thru boots and hooves on the ground: Trail Work, Education and Advocacy. The BCHA has nearly 14,000 members in 176 chapters across 29 states. In 2013, Back Country Horsemen volunteered over 372,000 hours of work devoted to keeping the trails open in our national forests, national parks and state lands.  BCHA members conduct numerous packing and Leave No Trace clinics each year. The BCHA works with other outdoors organization such as The Wilderness Society to advocate with public lands managers and legislators to keep our trails open – for you.

Jill Montgomery

Jill Montgomery is a CHA certified English and Western Riding Instructor, and Equine Facility Manager. She owns and operates the Arroyo Ranch in Pueblo West, CO and is the CEO of JRAM Enterprises, Inc. an Equine Consulting Business. Working in the horse industry for more than 30 years, her experience spans activities as diverse as managing the U.S. Army’s Dude Ranch to serving as Executive Director for the American Youth Horse Council. A published author and equine welfare advocate, Montgomery works to keep equine activities accessible and enjoyable in America.

Expert Witnessing; A Look Inside the Courtroom – Marriott Hotel – Thursday at 3:30 p.m.

The last place most riding instructors would want to appear is a courtroom to testify about how an equine activity led to an accident. Your reason for being involved in a civil liability suit and how you feel about participating in it would vary greatly if you were the defendant, the plaintiff, or an expert witness being paid for your testimony and expert opinions. This session will focus on the role of expert witnesses and help participants understand how the people without law degrees in the courtroom contribute to the judge and jury’s decisions. This topic is important because the outcomes of these courts cases influence, for better and for worse, everyone’s accessibility and enjoyment of equine activities.

Darley Newman

Charismatic TV host and horsewoman Darley Newman travels the globe hosting and producing the Emmy-winning TV series “Equitrekking,” which takes viewers on active horseback riding adventures with local people and is broadcast on PBS and international networks in over 84 countries. She also hosts travel series on AOL, Scripps Networks’ ulive and is a contributing editor for Budget Travel magazine. With Equitrekking Darley combines her passion for horses and travel with her background in television production. Darley has worked with 48 Hours, CBS, FRONTLINE, has hosted Equitrekking segments on the Starz Networks Encore Channel, Ralph Lauren TV and reporting live news from the White House and Capitol Hill. Recently, Darley has led film crews on national and international shoots, riding with cowboys in the Canadian Rockies, interviewing HRH Princess Alia at the Royal Stables in Jordan, trekking through the world’s largest inland delta in Africa and beyond–– all to help educate and excite her dedicated fans. Darley has been honored with five Daytime Emmy Award nominations, alongside media moguls Ellen DeGeneres, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, received the North American Travel Journalist Award two years in a row and been honored with the Inspiring Woman Award from Women in Philanthropy and Leadership. An entrepreneur and published author, Darley created and oversees a variety of websites with resources for travelers interested in horseback riding around the world, including Equitrekking.com, EquitrekkingTravel.com and Top20Ranches.com.

Keynote – Equitrekking – Marriott Hotel – Thursday at 5:30 p.m.

Love exploring a new place on horseback? Join equestrian travel expert Darley Newman, host of the Emmy-winning PBS TV series “Equitrekking,” for a video countdown of the top destinations you’ve got to add to your bucket list. Watch stunning behind the scenes video from global travels, as Darley tells you the best places to saddle up for all riding styles and levels, including helpful tips on how to make your dream trip come true. With personal stories of harrowing adventures from horseback riding in iconic US and international locations, including the desert in Jordan, rainforests and beaches in Costa Rica, national parks in the USA, volcanoes in Hawaii and beyond, you won’t want to miss this educational and exciting keynote.

National Reining Horse Association

What horseman doesn’t love to see a smooth stopping horse that can spin on a dime and rollback in his tracks after the slightest of cues? The National Reining Horse Association promotes the sport of Reining and these athletic and maneuverable athletes. From training DVDs and entry-level classes to local shows and the NRHA Professionals program, NRHA can improve your day in the saddle – whether you’re in the show pen or on the trail. Visit www.nrha.com to find out how you can have the slide of your life in the sport of Reining.

Ride a Reiner – Covered Arena – Saturday at Noon

First offered in 2010 at the Alltech© FEI World Equestrian Games in Lexington, Ky., “NRHA Ride a Reiner” has taken the country by storm by giving novice and experienced riders the opportunity to ride a reining horse. Nowhere else in the world can spectators find an option like this: the chance to receive a hands-on lesson from an NRHA Professional, to enjoy a dizzying spin and to feel the power of sliding stops on a well-trained reining horse!

Sue Robinson

Sue has taught riding for over 40 years, as a volunteer 4-H leader, in the private industry as an instructor at Robinson Farms, as manager, instructor, and trainer at Overcup Oaks Quarter Horses and presently as Coordinator of Riding, Lecturer, and Equestrian Team coach for both Stock Seat and Hunt Seat at Murray State University. Sue is a member of Certified Horsemanship Association, AQHA’s Professional Horseman’s Association, the National Association of Equine Affiliated Academics and advisor of MSU Horseman’s Club. Sue has trained equestrians from local to national competitions.

Building Rider Strength and Fitness Through Exercise – Covered Arena – Friday at 4:30 p.m.

In our society today much attention is being focused on lack of physical fitness, this lack follows through into the horse industry. Although much emphasis is placed on having a horse in condition to perform, for a horse to achieve maximum performance the rider must also be physically fit. When a rider is in top physical condition they will be able to continuously supply the support for the horse to perform at the highest level. This conditioning or fitness can be attained and maintained through a set of exercises designed to work on balance and softness or relaxation of the joints. These must be achieved together as one complements the other when riding. Through predetermined exercises both on and off the horse, a rider, from beginner to advanced, can develop a body awareness or muscle memory that allows them to feel when they are in proper alignment with the horse’s center of gravity and be able to maintain that alignment. Whether you are riding Western or English, the correct body position to achieve balance and remain soft or relaxed through your seat and joints is the same. The body must be aligned; ear, shoulder hip heel. This same alignment is also used in other sports such as martial arts, golf, skiing, skating, or just walking. The set of exercises presented here work on balance and softness of the riders joints, as well as rider strength. These exercises work on the whole body or they can target specific areas where special effort is needed. Even the most timid riders benefit from exercise as they acquire balance and strength, and gain self-confidence as they move around on their horses back in various positions. Like all athletes, riders should warm up to prepare to ride, just as they warm up their horse. The use of an exercise routine, whatever discipline you ride will benefit both horse and rider. The one that will benefit most from a rider that can balance, stay relaxed, and have the endurance to support throughout the ride is the horse. A properly prepared and warmed up horse and rider become a team that can be comfortable on the trail or formidable in the arena.

Cheryl Rohnke Kronsberg

Cheryl grew up riding horses and started training professionally at the age of 16. She is now a CHA Master Instructor, CHA Clinic Instructor, CHA Region 10 Director and an AQHA Professional Horseman with over 35 years experience teaching riders and training horses of all levels. At her home, CRK Training Stable, Cheryl boards, trains and teaches riding. Her students range from complete beginners to upper level show riders. You can contact Cheryl at CRK Training Stable at www.crktrainingstable.com

Sideways – Teaching Side Pass and Pivot – Covered Arena Annex – Friday at 1:30 p.m.

Cheryl will be teaching about those ever elusive lateral movements-Side Passing & Pivoting. We will begin on the ground as is appropriate for weanlings or yearlings headed to the in-hand trail classes or any horse that needs a better handle on the ground. Then we will move to under saddle methods for safe, smooth and efficient movements that are helpful on the trail, in the arena or the show pen. Cheryl will also stress the best ways to teach these skills to riders new to the concepts.

Dale Rudin

Dale is certified with the Certified Horsemanship Association as a Western and English instructor. She has been training horses and teaching riders for over 30 years. She developed Unnatural Horsemanship®, a mindful approach to training and horsemanship that focuses on the instincts that drive a horse as a herd and prey animal. Each horse is seen as an individual with a unique personality, inherent abilities, and experiential history. She resolves problems related to behavior or performance by improving the horse’s physical and emotional well-being and enhancing relationship, communication, and understanding between horse and human. In addition to working with horses and their people, Dale shares her techniques and philosophies in articles and columns in Horse Illustrated magazine and on HorseChannel.com. She has also written for Young Rider, Paint Horse Journal, and Horses USA (now Your First Horse). Dale lives in Middle Tennessee and offers private instruction, clinics, and classes, helping all breeds of horses and levels of rider create successful partnerships and collaborative teams.

Riding Instructor Challenge – Covered Arena – Saturday at 4:30 p.m.

Come and watch while CHA Instructors battle it out to see who can teach a brand new rider the best! It is like the Mustang Make Over and other challenges that you see at Expos except with a CHA flair! May the Best Instructor Win!

Cindy Rullman

Cindy is a lifelong advocate for animals. She spent several years in the Thoroughbred industry working at Spendthrift Farm, Ashford Stud, and on the backstretch at Keeneland racetrack. Next she moved into the office and worked several years in advertising, public relations, and marketing for equine businesses, before spending six years in fundraising and public relations at the Lexington Humane Society. Later, she worked for eight years in public relations at the Kentucky Horse Park, where she launched the park’s first homeless horse adoption events and free gelding clinics, during which time she received the “Welfare Advocate of the Year” award from the Kentucky Horse Council. Most recently, Cindy joined the 1,000-member global staff of the Brooke – the largest international equine welfare organization in the world – as their only staff member in North America. She also serves on the Advisory Board of the Kentucky Equine Humane Center and supports several animal protection organizations.

Juan Valdez Had a Donkey – Enhancing the Standard of Care for the World’s Most Important and Undervalued Worker – KHP Club Lounge – Friday at 9 a.m.

This is our 80th anniversary for the Brooke, so it’s a very big year for us. Last year we reached more than 1.1 million working equines in 11 developing countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Ethiopia, Kenya, Egypt, Jordan, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Senegal).  We provided veterinary care for the animals and a great deal of training for their owners in better animal husbandry practices.  These people and their animals are the poorest of the poor, so everything that we teach and do is sustainable in these poverty-stricken countries. The people are utterly dependent upon their animals to provide a meagre living for their families, so as we reduce the suffering of the animals, we are also helping the owners and their families, who will have a healthier, happier animal who can continue to work for them.

Bennie Sargent

A lifelong resident of Georgetown, Kentucky, Bennie began his horse show career as a youth in 4-H and Quarter Horse competitions, graduating to the amateur ranks at the end of his youth eligibility. He soon decided to make horse training his life’s work, turned in his amateur card and set about building his business and his reputation as a professional trainer specializing in all-around horses. Bennie has been a successful trainer for more than 35 years. He has trained and shown horses to seven versatility championships, multiple AQHA championships, and numerous AQHA Honor Roll honors in several events, including halter, reining, working hunter, and trail. He has also guided customers, primarily youth and amateurs, to multiple AQHA, AQHYA, Congress, APHA, IBHA and PHBA championships. Bennie is also very involved in NRHA competition, having been an NRHA member for more than 30 years. Several of his non-pro and youth customers have ranked in the top 10 in the nation. He has had horses place at the Congress in the NRHA events as well as AQHA reining. A national AQHA director for the past twelve years, Bennie is active on the Professional Horsemen’s Committee. He is on the AQHA Show Council and the Drug and Tail Task Force. He has served on the World Show Task Force Committee and the Long Range Strategic Planning Committee for AQHA shows. In addition to being an AQHA judge for 17 years, Bennie holds cards in APHA, PHBA, IBHA and NSBA. Bennie, his wife Cheryllee and their daughter Sydney live in Paris, KY in the heart of Bluegrass Country. Sargent Quarter Horses has 40 stalls as well as indoor and outdoor arenas.

Riding Squares Instead of Circles – Covered Arena – Friday at 10:30 a.m.

We are often taught to ride circles, but what about squares? Great take home exercises for your students at all levels to be successful riding squares instead or as well as circles and becoming better horsemen by doing so.

Jochen Schleese

Jochen documented over 34 years of his experience as German Certified Master Saddler and Saddle Ergonomist in his books ‘Suffering in Silence – The Saddle Fit Link to Physical and Psychological trauma in Horses’ (2013), ‘The Silent Killer’ (2012) and DVD ’Beyond the 9 Points of Saddle Fit’.

Is your Horse Suffering in Silence? – Detailed Look at Saddle Fit – Covered Arena Annex – Saturday at 10:30 a.m.

Common serious effects of ill-fitting saddles include: chipped shoulder cartilage, sore back, behavioral issues, pain and lameness. Jochen shares insights and solutions to achieve optimal saddle fit.

Rider Issues and the Gender of Saddle Fit – Covered Arena – Saturday at 1:30 p.m.

Are you struggling with an ill-fitting saddle? Sore back, hips, knees, pelvic discomfort, feeling ‘pulled apart’, chair seat, struggling to maintain position, fighting the saddle, feeling ‘behind’ or ‘in front of’ the motion? Jochen explains these issues and shares solutions for the differing anatomy of women and men.

Tom Schell, D.V.M, CVCH

Tom is a private practicing equine veterinarian in North Carolina for the past 20 years, focusing currently on consultations regarding the impact and use of herbs and nutrition in managing chronic disorders in the horse. In 2006, Dr. Schell started Nouvelle Research, Inc., a private research organization dedicated to investigating the impact of chronic inflammation, immune dysfunction and the use of targeted herbs in the management of many chronic conditions in horses, pets and people. Out of this research, the Cur-OST line of all natural anti-inflammatory supplements was created, being put in use in horses worldwide for the past 8 years with tremendous success. In 2014, Dr. Schell started the Handi-Capp Equine Rehabilitation & Relocation program, putting to use the research he has gathered as well as Cur-OST product formulations to aid in the recovery of injured TB’s coming off of the racetrack with the goal of restoring soundness and enhancing the chances of relocation to a new home.

Chronic Inflammation and the Horse; Laminitis and Insulin Resistance – KHP Club Lounge – Friday at 4:30 p.m.

This lecture will help make connections with many current disease and lameness conditions in equines. Given our research over the past 8 years, we feel we have made huge strides in helping many horses to recovery from conditions once thought to be career ending or cost prohibitive for the owners to manage.

Mary Ann Simonds

Mary Ann has integrated her academic degrees in equine and human behavioral psychology and ecology with her equestrian background, working professionally for over 35 years in the horse industry. She grew up in California showing jumpers, and then attended the University of California and University of Wyoming to study the social ecology, behavior, and biology of wild horses. Realizing the need for higher education in our horse industry, Mary Ann founded the Whole Horses & Equestrian Science Institute in 1985 while brokering Sport Horses to bring more science of horses as a species into the horse world. Later, she received her master’s degree studying the interactions and relationships of horses and people helping to define the fields of Interspecies and Equestrian Psychology. She serves as scientific advisor for several equine non-profits and was an appointed member of the 1990 Federal Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. With one foot in the world of science and the other in the world of horses, Mary Ann acts a bridge and often is referred to as the “missing piece” for horsemen. She has developed a line of stress management and therapeutic products for horses including conducting research on magnetic field therapy and vibrational medicine in the late 1980s. A speaker, author, producer, equestrian, clinician, coach and horse lover, Mary Ann is passionate about educating others to better understand the real nature and culture of horses in an effort to limit stress in horses, ultimately improving performance and cooperation.

Equine Sports Coaching Skills – Covered Arena Annex – Friday at 3 p.m.

Presents an overview of the basic psychology with a little neural biology of horse and rider, and how to achieve better communication and deep connections. Exercises include body/mind techniques integrating such modalities as NLP, cognitive skills, brain waves shifts, visualizations, energy management breathing and heart coherence. The importance of thought and energy management of riders is stressed with respect to their relationship with their horse, and communication to bring about a positive relationship for various disciplines.

Ward Stutz

Ward is the current CHA President and the Senior Director of Breed Integrity for the American Quarter Horse Association. He is responsible for AQHA’s animal welfare initiatives, which include the steward program to ensure all animals at AQHA events are treated humanely and exhibitors are practicing sportsmanlike conduct. In addition, he assists with AQHA’s public policy initiatives. He is the staff liaison to AQHA’s Professional Horsemen’s Council. Ward received his B.S. degree from Colorado State University in agriculture industries management and a M.S. from Oklahoma State University in animal science. His horse industry experience includes: training, judging, showing, racing, packing and teaching. Ward has been involved with many industry associations including: American Horse Council, Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, Animal Welfare Council and serving as Past President of the American Youth Horse Council.

Welcoming Keynote Address – Marriott Hotel – Thursday at 1 p.m.

Mitzi Summers

Mitzi has been devoted to the welfare and safety of horses and their people for most of her life. The recipient of the CHA Instructor of the Year Award, Mitzi is also one of less than thirty Level IV Centered Riding Instructors in the world. Through her achievement of CHA Master Instructor and Clinician, and a Centered Riding Clinician, Mitzi has certified or updated hundreds of instructors so far in her career. She has taught and trained in many countries, including South Africa, New Zealand, and throughout Europe. Mitzi specializes in working in a very individualized basis with riders and their horses, teaching them to train their own horses in a non-abusive way. She is truly multi-talented, working with a rider in Ireland short-listed for the Olympics, to a rider who has fear issues and is afraid to trot. Horses who have been confused or traumatized are her specialty. Three of her mentors were Charles Grant, Vi Hopkins, and Sally Swift, all recipients of the USDF Hall of Fame Award. Mitzi will be interested in helping you and your horse no matter what level or discipline, she truly “Teaches the Beauty of Horses”.

Semi Private Centered Riding Lessons – Covered Arena – Friday at 9 a.m.

Come and ride with Mitzi for only $55 with one other person and get some specialized attention in Centered Riding.

Long Lining and Double Lunging – Covered Arena Annex – Friday at 10:30 a.m.

Ground work with horses can be invaluable in the process of either preparing a young horse to be ridden, or in further developing suppleness and strength in an older horse. Mitzi will go through the step by step process involved in teaching a horse these skills so the horse remains calm and accepts the training without fear or stress. Ground work skills for a horse can be invaluable, but are frequently used incorrectly or misunderstood. There will be an opportunity for hands-on practice for some observers.

Western Dressage Defined – Covered Arena Annex – Saturday at 3 p.m.

Western dressage is rapidly becoming more popular for western riders who are looking for an activity that will improve their horses. The true test of schooling your horse should be that you are improving his balance, strength, suppleness, and encouraging a willing and calm disposition. Correct Western Dressage accomplishes this. Mitzi completed The Western Dressage Association of America’s Trainer’s Course this year in North America. The standards demonstrated and discussed were clearly for the benefit of the horse. Riders in this presentation will be assisted with the effectiveness of their equitation and aids to correctly develop the athleticism of their horses.

Jody Taylor

Jody rode his first horse at about 4 years old and then learned to rope before 10 and was entering some local shows and rodeos in Texas. Jody was involved in Texas High School Rodeo Association, roping and riding rough stock. His first job was at a stable just a couple of miles down the road named Cedarwood Farm. There he learned the daily activities and duties of a boarding stable, lesson program and the operation of a Horse Trial. Then he was employed at a large Arabian facility known as Bentwood Farms and rode with John Burris, out of Stephenville, Texas training horses. In his mid-thirties he started focusing more on horses and completed his rodeo career. Jody and his wife, Kim a trainer as well, purchased a horse property, Star T Ranch. Starting out they ran a cow/calf herd, horse boarding, riding lessons, training, and equine transportation facility. Eventually they narrowed this down and focused on just horse boarding, riding lessons, training and equine transportation. They provide English and Western riding lessons, specializing in Eventing, including Dressage, Show Jumping and Cross Country. They incorporate natural horsemanship into Eventing and Hunter Jumpers and are members of CHA, USEA, AreaV-Eventing, NTEA, NTHJC and AQHA. Kim and Jody are both certified instructors and care for 35 horses and have 50 students. Visit www.StarTRanchtx.net.

Jumping Exercises – Covered Arena – Saturday at 9 a.m.

This jumping session will encompass the different seats such as the full seat and 2-point. The next step will involve an explanation of each seat and the reason for a change of seat at the walk, trot and canter. Ground poles will follow which will prepare the riders to ride the lines to and from the jumps thru poles in the trot and canter. The x-rails will be introduced demonstrating trotting using the 2-point to jump when starting out and then using a full seat while riding the canter. The next steps will be the verticals and negotiating the start of a course.

Flying Lead Changes – Covered Arena – Saturday at 3 p.m.

This session will start going through and giving examples of all the steps that it takes to enable a horse and rider to accomplish lead changes. It will also include realistic time lines depending on the horse. It will show examples of simple lead changes and move into flying lead changes and discuss young and more refined horses. A demonstration on the process will be given starting with the steps going all the way to Tempe changes.

Mitchell L. Taylor, CJF, DipWCF

Mitch began his farrier training in 1975 and has been an AFA Certified Journeyman Farrier since 1982. Mitch has served as the President of the Registry of Professional Farrier Educators, as a member of the AFA Equine Research Committee, served on the AFA Board of Directors and served as Chairman of the AFA Education Committee. He also serves on the Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit Shoeing and Hoof Care Committee. With a BS in Biology and Chemistry, Mitch did his post graduate work in Equine Physiology at the University of Kentucky. Currently, Mitch is the director of the Kentucky Horseshoeing School in Richmond, KY where he continues to pursue his interest in equine research by continually investigating equine anatomy and biomechanics and how that is affected through various shoeing modalities. Mitch has twice been awarded the AFA’s Educator of the Year award and is proud to count his many successful students Mitch is proud to count 6 members of the AFA US National Horseshoeing Team as well as students who have earned positions with various US equine teams, leading veterinary hospitals, university veterinary schools and have even shod Kentucky Derby winners.

Taking Great Care of the Lesson Horse – Marriott Hotel – Thursday at 3:30 p.m.

You will learn in this talk why it is so important to have regular, competent hoof care for your sport horse and the relationship of healthy feet, sound horses and good athletes.

An Overview of Good Hoof Care Including Basic Anatomy – KHP Club Lounge – Friday at 10:30 a.m.

In this talk you will learn the anatomy, dynamics and functions of the horses’ foot. You will learn the characteristics of a healthy foot, and how to identify the difference between healthy feet and those that are not. We will talk about the physiology of normal feet, and the variations of normalcy that we see within a population. You will learn the function of a horse shoe, the correct application and use of them, and how shoes can be helpful, in the right hands, with conformation, gaiting and therapeutic purposes.

Randi Thompson

Randi is the founder of the “Horse and Rider Awareness ® Educational Programs” and ”How to Market Your Horse Business.”   She has been in the horse industry for over 3 decades and has been coaching professionals for 20+ years in horse and rider training, business and marketing.  Randi has worked with many breeds of horses and styles of riding in her career and has produced national winners in the worlds of dressage, hunter/jumper, western pleasure, and flat shod walking horses.  Randi has been featured as the keynote speaker at the largest equestrian trade shows in the US and will be presenting at the Mass. Equine Affaire this year.  Randi is also a horse industry legal consultant and expert witness.

What Does It Really Mean to Ride From Your Seat and Legs? – Covered Arena Annex – Friday at 4:30 p.m.

Everyone talks about riding from your seat and legs, but what does that really mean?  Now you can watch what happens as Randi takes riders through a process that shows them how to feel when a horse is “under their seat” and moving from their legs.  This session includes keeping a horse straight, turns on the forehand, leg yielding and more.  Would you like to have more advanced techniques that you can use in your riding or with your students?  If so, this is a session that you will want to see.

United States Polo Association

Originally known as The Polo Association, the USPA was created in 1890 to govern polo handicaps, rules, and tournaments in America and Canada. Constantly growing and obtaining more members, the USPA has a multitude of programs designed to help American polo players improve their skills and compete in the “Game of Kings.”

Polo Demonstration and Lessons – Covered Arena – Friday at Noon

Come and learn more about the sport of polo and how to incorporate some of the exercises into your current riding program. Then hop on and play a mock game of polo!

United States Polo Association – Round Table Talk – Marriott Hotel – Thursday at 2 p.m.

Nathan Voris, DVM, MBA

Dr. Voris serves as a senior veterinarian on the Zoetis equine technical services team. Dr. Voris graduated from the University of Missouri’s College of Veterinary Medicine and completed an internship at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. Prior to joining Zoetis he was an equine veterinarian for 10 years in central Missouri.

While in practice, Dr. Voris earned his Master of Business Administration degree from William Woods University which equipped him to expand his role in practice. As a result, Dr. Voris drove the practice’s marketing and client education initiatives by utilizing technology to enhance practice productivity and client communications with primary focus on integrating the clinic’s website with multiple social networking platforms. Dr. Voris understands the demands of busy equine professionals and has balanced the management responsibilities of business communications and social media while performing veterinary duties in a progressive, equine clinical practice. His experiences have enabled him to assist equine veterinarians, small business owners and horsemen from across the country with practical strategies to develop and share content and tools to make the process of feeding the social media beast less burdensome.

Social Media Defined for the Horse Industry – KHP Club Lounge – Saturday at 1:30 p.m.

You’re an expert at guiding your students and horses to the best that they can be. Sometimes, it’s a daunting task to work ‘on’ your business instead of just ‘in’ it, from a time standpoint since you’re busy teaching! Gain time tested and proven methods that help you develop your strategy to answer key questions about why clients should work with you and define your competitive advantage that reaches your specific target audience. Strategic Marketing Planning helps you focus your efforts on the right clients. Using Social Media effectively and providing the most efficient way is part of that plan. Get the right tools so your potential new clients hear your value message and recall the information. Solidify your existing clients so they recommend you. It is important that you are communicating to the right people, at the right time. You’ll come away with defining your competitive advantage, how to target client segments and how to save time and money using social media in a way that speaks to your strengths and engage your clients while building your own raving fan club.

Jan Weber

Jan currently co-owns and manages EVADI Farm, a 100 acre boarding facility with 30 stalls in Paris, KY.  She was the Deputy Competition Director for Vaulting at the 2010 World Equestrian Games in Lexington, KY and an invited member of the CHIO Aachen Vaulting Show Office team in 2013 and the European Vaulting Championships in 2015.  She has served as a board member representing vaulting for the United States Equestrian Federation, the United States Equestrian Team, the American Youth Horse Council and the American Vaulting Association.  She was a member of the original joint CHA/AVA Certification Committee in 2004.  Her love of vaulting began in 1992 and she has focused on developing vaulting as an introductory equestrian sport and helping all equestrians understand the benefits of the sport as a supplemental riding program for existing programing.

 American Vaulting Association – Marriott Round Table Talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

Come and find out more about the AVA and how you can get vaulting started in your lesson program.

Mary Anna Wood

Mary Anna works for the Internal Revenue Service and in her free time competes in NATRC rides around the country. Her horse Elmer and she accumulated many miles and awards in NATRC during their career together. Mary Anna is a CHA Clinic Instructor in both Trail and English/Western.

North American Trail Ride Conference – Marriott Hotel Round Table Talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

The North American Trail Ride Conference (NATRC) provides long distance competitive trail rides for riders of all equine breeds and from all disciplines. It promotes safety, sportsmanship, education and trail horse advocacy through qualified evaluation of horse and rider by veterinary and horsemanship judges, in a fun, responsible environment for the whole family.

Lisa Wysocky

Lisa is a registered level PATH International instructor and also holds certifications as a mentor, and an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning. In addition, she has been chosen as one of the country’s Top 50 riding instructors by ARIA. With a life balanced between books and horses, Lisa is an author, equine clinician, and motivational speaker who trains horses for and consults with therapeutic riding programs. Lisa graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in equine management, and then brought her ideas on success to the show ring. Early wins on the national Appaloosa horse show circuit took Lisa across North America, where she was asked to speak, or to write articles for national publications. Lisa’s passion for writing and speaking led to a second run at college where she studied communications and journalism. Lisa is the co-author of a number of books, including My Horse, My Partner: Teamwork on the Ground, which helps horse and human partners form amazing bonds using traditional ground training, natural horsemanship, and desensitization. Lisa combines her love of horses and country music in Horse Country: A Celebration of Country Music and the Love of Horses. This beautiful coffee table book features twenty-seven of the top stars of country music talking about how horses changed their life for the better. The publication of the four-time award winning equestrian mystery, The Opium Equation, marked Lisa’s debut fiction effort. The follow up, The Magnum Equation, takes place at an all-breed horse show. Both books were recently optioned for television. Learn more at http://www.lisawysocky.com

American Competitive Trail Horse Association – Marriott Hotel Round Table Talk – Thursday at 2 p.m.

Come and find out more about ACTHA and how you can get involved.

A Riding Lesson from the Horse’s Perspective – Covered Arena – Saturday at 10:30 a.m.

What the horse sees, hears, tastes, and smells during your riding lesson, and how this information impacts your lesson. Lisa brings the audience through a typical riding lesson that incorporates both western trail obstacles and English equipment such as small jumps and cavaletti poles, and explains each step of the lesson from the horse’s point of view. From your body posture and facial expression; to the color, size, and placement of your arena equipment and obstacles; to the rider’s movements, this eye-opening session is a must-see for every instructor.

JoAnne Young

JoAnne has been teaching riding and training horses for over 40 years, and is happy that she is still learning. Every student and every horse bring fresh challenges that keep life interesting. She has been privileged and blessed beyond her wildest dreams to study with such wonderful instructors as Walter Zettl (dressage coach to Canadian event team when they won bronze at Los Angeles Olympics), Bertin Potter in Germany, Molly Sivewright (FEI judge and past chair of the Fellows of the British Horse Society), Carel Eijkenaar (FEI judge), Eddo Hoestra (FEI Trainer) and Doris Halstead (Physical Therapist and author of “Releasing the Potential: Physical Therapy Modalities for Horse and Rider.” Jo-Anne is the author of the M.A. thesis: “Preparing students for riding instructor certification through college curricula.”

 Semi- Private Dressage Lessons – Covered Arena – Friday at 9 a.m.

Ride with JoAnne for only $55 to receive some specialized attention in dressage.

Youth Involvement 101 – Kids & Horses

Kids and horses are a magical combination. Seeing the joy that washes over a child’s face while they ride for the first time is truly inspiring. If you are a parent, grandparent, or other guardian looking for ways for a special young person in your life to get into riding, rest assured that there are plenty of options. Each option has different time and financial commitments, which could also differ based on the local club or group you become involved with within a national organization.

The Certified Horsemanship Association offers options through its members, who are riding instructors, driving instructors, instructors for riders with disabilities, vaulting coaches, trail guides, equestrian facility staff, or camp staff. If you want to try lessons for the child in your life, CHA’s certified experts are a great option. It’s important to understand the credentials of anyone you work with, do thorough research, and make a careful decision because you want to make sure your child gets off to the right start and has a positive and safe experience. In a past blog post, CHA explored why it’s important to find a certified instructor. http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/why_a_certified_instructor.html.

To look for CHA members in your area that are certified and offering riding opportunities in your area, you can search the free online database at CHA.horse. You can also find CHA Accredited Facilities at that same link. And once you have a list of options in your area, CHA offers more information on how to choose a riding instructor at http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/choosing_an_instructor.html or you can listen to CHA’s interview of two experts on the subject on this recording of the CHA Segment on Horses in the Morning. http://www.horseradionetwork.com/2016/04/19/hitm-for-04-19-2016-by-cha-choosing-summer-camp-or-lesson-program

In addition to riding lessons, many children have their first experience with horses at a camp or just do a search for all CHA facilities in your area. You can search for a CHA Accredited Facility that is a camp on CHA.horse by typing in “camp” into the search field. To read more about finding a camp with horses, check out the blog posts titled, “Attending a Camp with Horseback Riding” at http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/horse_camps.html and “How to Find the Best Horse Camp” at http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/how_to_find_the_best_horse_camp.html. In addition, the American Camp Association has been a partner of CHA in the past and offers an abundance of information on their website. http://www.acacamps.org

In the past, CHA has even offered CHA Young Riders Clinics for new young riders. http://www.equisearch.com/discoverhorses/video/video-cha-young-riders-clinic-23140

In addition to CHA instructors and camps, there are many additional options in the equine industry for youth to get involved. Some of the most well-known options include 4-H, FFA, and Pony Clubs. One thing to remember with 4-H and FFA is that they are not just exclusively about horses, so if your child is ONLY interested in horses and would not enjoy the other activities, then you may want to go with one of the other organizations mentioned below.

4-H is the Cooperative Extension System’s youth development program with 110 U.S. land-grand universities involved, which helps to make it the largest youth development organization with more than six million kids involved between the ages of 8 and 18 in more than 3,000 counties in rural, suburban, and rural areas across the United States. Every state and county across America, Washington D.C., Puerto Rico, and 80 other countries have local offices. The equine curriculum has five horse project activity guides with Levels 1-3 focusing on “horseless” activities, while riding and horsemanship is the focus of Levels 4 and 5. To look into joining or volunteering with 4-H, or to learn more, visit www.4-H.org to find your local 4-H office.

The National FFA Organization, mostly known as FFA, or the Future Farmers of America, involves teaching youth about livestock, including horses, and agricultural topics, although it is not just for those who want to be farmers. Anyone interested in those topics or those who want to become a teacher, doctor, scientist, veterinarian, engineer, chemist, biologist, business owner, etc., would benefit from involvement in FFA. Students participate in classroom and laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural programs, and student leadership opportunities within the organization. And for those who start FFA as a child and want to continue, there is the Collegiate FFA, programs for adults, and the opportunity to volunteer as an adult. FFA allows participants to connect with a mentor, win awards, and participate on horse judging and horsemanship teams. Within these teams, your child will learn how to judge horses just like the professionals do at horse competitions. To get involved with FFA, look for the nearest chapter organized at the local school level. This chapter is connected to your state’s association underneath the national organization. To learn more, visit www.ffa.org.

The United States Pony Clubs (USPC) provides horsemanship and horse care instruction. Its core values include horsemanship, organized teamwork, and respect for horse and self through horsemanship, service, and education. Participants can now stay within the organization until they are 25 if they meet requirements. There is no minimum age set by the national organization, but many local clubs set a minimum age. There are Pony Clubs in many countries worldwide, and the U.S.’s organization was originally an offshoot of the British Pony Club. USPC offers mounted and unmounted meetings, clinics, rallies, certifications, exchanges, and other special opportunities. Certifications are available within the disciplines of dressage, show jumping, and some Western disciplines. To become a member of USPC, members join through their local Pony Club or through a riding center that has been recognized by the USPC to administer the Pony Club program. Parents and volunteers administer the program; this is important to keep in mind since it will involve a time commitment from whoever is taking the child to meetings and events. With that said, this type of activity, which requires parental participation, is a great way to get involved and bond with your child, grandchild, niece, nephew, etc. While horse ownership is not required, participants must arrange to have a pony or horse available to ride and may need to trailer that horse to meetings or events. But don’t let this discourage you. Many riding centers can provide a horse for a child to use for Pony Club activities, as long as it is not a stallion and the mount is at least five years old. To learn more, visit www.ponyclub.org.

The National Little Britches Association (NLBRA) is for children ages 5 to 18 who want to participate in rodeo events and Pee Wee Rodeos. There are almost 400 youth rodeos within 15 states, and these events allow youth to qualify for the National Finals Rodeo. While it seems like a smaller organization, it involves more than 2,000 kids from 27 states that compete in NLBRA events every year. Equine events include breakaway calf roping, tie-down calf roping, team roping, barrel racing, pole bending, and goat tying. For more information, visit www.nlbra.com.

One organization helps youth and youth leaders in the equine industry regardless of breed or discipline organization. That is the American Youth Horse Council (AYHC), which serves as a national information center that offers ongoing training opportunities to youth and to people looking to teach kids about horses. AYHC strives to provide opportunities for youth leaders to network among adults in the industry. It also produces high-quality educational resources for kids. AYHC grants helps youth to attend equine activities in the United States.

In addition to these organizations, there are also youth organizations within most horse breed and discipline organizations. These organizations offer a variety of activities, leadership opportunities, ways for children to be mentored, events and conferences, and even all-youth championship horse shows. Some examples include the:

  • American Quarter Horse Youth Association (AQHYA),
  • American Junior Paint Horse Association (AjPHA),
  • National Reining Horse Youth Association (NRHYA),
  • Arabian Horse Youth Association (AHYA),
  • Appaloosa Youth Association (AYA),
  • American Morgan Horse Association Youth (AMHAY),
  • National Reined Cow Horse Association Youth (NRCHAY),
  • National Youth Cutting Horse Association (NYCHA),
  • And many more.

Many organizations offer contests and youth awards through their youth associations or through the parent organization. It’s important to keep this in mind and research in advance since some of these awards must be applied for in advance or require an accumulation of points or achievements, which can help kids focus towards achieving a goal. Some awards are not just for riding achievements; many are given to those who exemplify sportsmanship, volunteerism, leadership, commitment, dedication, and other similar traits that adults are trying to teach to the next generation. Some contests and awards may be geared toward youth with a special talent, such as art, photography, writing, etc. Several youth awards offered by breed and discipline organizations include scholarships and grants.

Within one of the largest disciplines, dressage, the United States Dressage Federation (USDF) offers a variety of programs for youth on upward. USDF’s Platinum Performance Junior/Young Rider Clinic Series offers educational opportunities for riders age 14 to 21, while the Young Rider Graduate Program educates riders age 20-28. Many of these riders may go on to compete in upper-level dressage events. Clinics by some of the top dressage clinicians continue the dressage education for attendees on a variety of topics. Meanwhile, the Youth Dressage Sport Horse Breeder/Handler Seminar assists those with a desire to specialize in sport horse breeding and handling and to familiarize them with the breeding and showing of dressage prospects and breeding stock.

In addition to various opportunities for education, USDF offers the USDF Youth Convention Scholarship Program to provide financial support to young dressage enthusiasts who want to attend the annual convention. And the Ravel Education Grants recognizes outstanding displays of sportsmanship among USDF youth. These grants can help cover expenses associated with attending an educational dressage event of the winners’ choice.

In addition to the programs above, don’t forget to ask your student’s school if they have recognized or affiliated programs within the equine industry. One example is the USDF Youth Dressage Rider Recognition Pin Program, which provides pins to kids from sixth grade through 12th grade if their middle school or high school or home school program is a participating member.

A similar program includes the United States Equestrian Federation’s Athlete Letter Program for kids in fifth grade through 12th grade who document their training and competition involvement in order to win emblems and pins, just like other sports earn letters and pins for school jackets. In addition, USEF started offering the USEF High School Scholarship, which provides $1,000 grant to one graduating high school senior that plans on pursuing an equestrian-related degree or compete on an intercollegiate equestrian team. One of the most prestigious national awards is the USEF Youth Sportsman’s Award, which was designed to develop leaders in the equine industry from all breeds and disciplines. Each year, USEF seeks a winner that demonstrates a commitment and dedication to the promotion of equestrian sport and who can serve as a role model for peers, be involved in community activities, and exhibit great sportsmanship. One final honor available to juniors is the USEF Junior Equestrian of the Year Award, which is one of USEF’s most prestigious awards. It is given to a junior member of USEF who exhibits the qualities of good sportsmanship and integrity and who exemplifies exceptional talent and dedication to the sport while showing compassion for horses and horse welfare. For more information on USEF’s programs, visit www.USEF.org.

The Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA) is offered for kids in grades 6th through 12th, and participants do not need to own a horse. Riders of various levels compete on IEA teams in hunt seat and Western disciplines throughout the school year for individual and team points and accolades. IEA teams are offered through public and private schools and through participating barns. Riders draw a name of a horse that has been provided for the competition and compete on that mount. There are more than 11,000 members competing in hundreds of events across the United States. For more information, visit www.RideIEA.org.

While this is not an exhaustive list of organizations with some sort of youth program, these are some of the most well-known programs. So whether you own a horse or not, and whether your child wants to ride or participate in another way, there are a variety of options. Stay tuned to our blog for a future post on the options available to college students.

College Level

The American National Riding Commission (ANRC) offers a rider certification program to schools, colleges, and universities, along with public or private riding programs. The goal is to promote the American System of Forward Riding. ANRC also offers instructional riding clinics, forums and symposiums on related topics, and cooperation with other organizations whose purposes align with those of ANRC. The ANRC Intercollegiate Equitation Championship offers college students a national championship that tests riders in a team aboard either college-owned horses or privately owned horses in a program ride (that includes USEF hunter equitation tests), a hunter seat equitation medal course, a derby course with natural jumps in a field, and a written test based on riding theory and stable management developed from the United States Hunter Jumper Association’s Trainer’s Certification Manual. For more information, please visit www.anrc.org.

The Intercollegiate/Interscholastic Dressage Association (IDA) allows college students to include dressage into their college experience. Every school year, colleges throughout the United States and Canada allow IDA riders to earn individual and team points through competitions in Introductory, Lower Training, Upper Training, and First Level. In 2015, dressage seat equitation was added. Riders compete on horses provided by the host college through random draw and are granted a 10-minute warm-up session aboard their mount. Regional winners go on to compete in a national championship that hosts 12 teams and 12 individual riders in the four areas levels listed above. IDA is a great option for riders who do not own horses or who have never done dressage, but who want to add it to their riding experience. For more information, visit www.teamdressage.com.

The Interscholastic Horse Show Association (IHSA) is for riders of all skill levels who compete on teams and as individuals within an IHSA region, zone, and at the national level across the United States and in parts of Canada. Anyone, regardless of riding experience, can compete for their participating college. Riders compete in hunt seat equitation, Western horsemanship, jumping, and reining. Riders do not need to own a horse, and the host college will provide horses for a competition. Riders compete by random draw and ride the horse they have drawn. For more information, visit www.ihsainc.com.

The Intercollegiate Saddle Seat Riding Association (ISSRA) is still a fairly new organization. At this point it is only eight years old. ISSRA’s mission is to establish saddle seat riding teams at colleges and universities across the United States for beginners through advanced riders. Participants do not need to own a horse since each team is paired with a local riding school as their home base. Their home base provides saddle seat instruction and team practices aboard the riding stable’s horses, as well as coaching at shows. This is the first program for saddle seat riding in an intercollegiate equestrian program. For more information, visit www.intercollegiatesaddleseat.com.

The National Collegiate Equestrian Association (NCEA), formerly Varsity Equestrian, was created to continue the advancement of equestrian sport as an emerging sport within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Your Cheat Sheet to College Riding Teams

Why You Should Find a Certified Riding Instructor

By Sarah Evers Conrad

So has it finally started? Has your child started asking for a horse? Or at least some riding lessons? Or maybe you are the one who dreams of galloping across an open field on your trusty steed. But how do you get started? Perhaps your first thought is to open up the Yellow Pages, or more often these days, run to the Internet to Google it. The problem with this is that anyone can advertise themselves as a riding instructor.

Think about this: Do you really want to trust just anyone to put your child on a 1,000-pound animal with a mind of its own? What about if they really don’t know what they are doing and there is an accident? Just like fitness trainers, emergency medical technicians, bus drivers, and auto mechanics require special training and a certificate or license to be in their field, so should riding instructors. For safety reasons alone, not just anyone should be able to call themselves a riding instructor and open up for business. Unfortunately, there is no law requiring this, but you can seek out a certified riding instructor for yourself or your child. And this is the smartest thing to do, especially if the prospective rider is a beginner.

The example above illustrates one of the best reasons to learn from a certified riding instructor, but there are many more reasons to find a certified instructor, and some excellent reasons why you should find someone certified through the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA).

The Importance of Certification

First off, let’s look at why you should find a certified instructor, and then we will get into why that instructor should be certified by the Certified Horsemanship Association.

1. Learning how to ride involves more than just climbing aboard and learning how to steer. Becoming an equestrian (a horseman or horsewoman) involves learning the following main items: how to take care of horses; how to handle horses in a safe and effective manner, both while mounted and on the ground; what to do in case of an emergency; how to care for the various parts of an equine facility–from the stall, to the tack room, to the fencing and beyond; what equipment and clothing you will need for riding and possibly competing, if you go that route; how to interact with other equestrians safely and appropriately, especially while mounted or in competition; what equipment (also called tack) is used on the horse; why certain tack is used; how to use tack; how to take care of tack; and more. These are just the basics. There is so much more to learn if you decide to compete or become a professional who works within the equine industry.

2. A certified instructor also knows what they are doing when they evaluate the rider’s position and technique while he/she is in the saddle. The instructor should be able to teach the rider how to ride with the correct position while also stressing safety and effectiveness.

3. A certified riding instructor will know when and how to make adjustments in tack, technique, and form, all while giving constructive criticism.

4. A certified instructor can teach the student about horse behavior and how to get the desired results from horses with different personalities without squashing the spirit of the horse. The beauty of horses are that they are not machines. Each one has a different personality, and when a rider knows how to work with various equine personalities in a harmonious fashion, then they have moved into the more advanced stages of horsemanship.

5. A certified riding instructor knows how to make each lesson fun. Even when a rider is having a frustrating moment, a certified instructor will know how to help the rider move through and past it so that the lesson becomes fun again. After all, that is what riding is all about. Most people get into it for the fun.

6. A certified instructor knows how to match a horse’s personality to a rider’s personality. This is important at a larger stable with multiple school horses or when buying that first horse.

7. A certified instructor knows how to instill self-confidence and can keep a rider from getting frustrated when a movement or lesson has not been going smoothly.

8. A certified riding instructor will know why certain things are done a certain way, but will also know about various methods of teaching and the various schools of thought that have developed during man’s history with horses. One example comes to mind when thinking of how an instructor can teach why things are done. Why do we put our heels down, and how far down should they be? Based on the discipline, your heels will be down hardly at all or quite a bit, and you don’t want to jam them down. Your heels act as shock absorbers for you and helps keep your pelvis open when you ride instead of it being closed. This then lessens bouncing while you ride. Knowing the “whys” and theory of riding is something a certified instructor will keep up on and be able to explain, and if you have a question they can’t answer, they will find the answer for you and get back with you!

9. A certified instructor can teach a beginning rider correctly from the start. It is a lot easier to begin riding with good habits vs. trying to break a rider’s bad habits that have been learned from a poor instructor. Getting off to a correct start can prevent a rider from wasting valuable time and money with a poor instructor, as well.

10. A certified riding instructor will know how to choose school horses carefully for their program. Therefore, riders at a barn with a certified instructor and multiple school horses will gain experience riding many different types of horses instead of just practicing with one or two horses owned by a non-certified instructor teaching in their back yard.

11. And for the rider who decides to go it alone and teach himself/herself how to ride using only videos, books, and the Internet, then this rider will be missing out on a lot of useful knowledge and the resources that a certified instructor can provide. In addition, the rider would not receive any of the benefits mentioned above. It is best to use a certified instructor and then supplement that instruction with the above sources.

12. One thing to remember is that even the best riders in the world have instructors or coaches. Professional horsemen and women know that there is always something valuable to learn from another well-trained equestrian. Many of those Olympic equestrians likely had their first ride with a riding instructor on a school horse.

The Importance of Certification from CHA

While there are other organizations that certify riders, several of these are designed for the more advanced rider or for the rider of a certain discipline. But for the purpose of this article, we have been discussing the more grassroots rider…the beginner. And this is the level of rider that CHA has strived to help the most throughout its 45+ year history. For those other organizations that certify instructors for beginning riders and beyond, many are not as in-depth and rigorous in their testing and requirements for their instructors to receive certification. For various reasons below, the program created by the Certified Horsemanship Association weeds out inexperienced instructors, leading to certified instructors that are better options for the beginning rider.

1. First and foremost, instructors certified through CHA have had to actually attend a multi-day intensive certification clinic, where they are tested with written tests, evaluated by two CHA clinic instructors and their peers (other clinic attendees), and where they participate in in-depth workshops and must share their ideas and teaching methods. Only then are they given a certification at the discretion of the two CHA certified instructors leading the clinic. This is much more involved than merely sending in a video, etc., for certification.

2. CHA certified instructors are tested on five of the most important aspects needed for a good instructor. These are: safety, horsemanship knowledge and ability, teaching techniques, group control, and responsibility and professionalism. Aspiring instructors must show proficiency in these five areas or they will go home without certification.

3. CHA instructors are only certified to the level that they can teach, meaning that an instructor should not be teaching beyond that level. So when a parent or prospective rider is seeking out an instructor, they know how far that instructor will be able to take them. However, certification and the level should be verified by the new student before starting with any instructor.

4. Since a CHA certified instructor has invested their time and their money to attend a certification clinic and participate in CHA’s program, a student will know that this instructor is a serious professional. They have committed themselves to demonstrating that they are a knowledgeable, safe, and effective instructor and business manager.

5. CHA instructors must also keep up to date on the latest techniques, news, and knowledge within their industry. By participating in 25 hours or more of continuing education and work within the equine industry, they can renew their certification once it has expired in three years vs. being re-tested at another clinic. Or to raise their level of certification, they are required to go through the testing process again. It is just as rigorous and intensive to raise his/her teaching certificate level.

6. Most CHA certified instructors continue learning more themselves at hands-on clinics and workshops put on by CHA or other equine organizations. This striving for excellence is certainly a reason to enlist the help of a CHA certified instructor to teach you or your child how to ride.

With these 18 reasons to use a certified riding instructor, and more importantly, one who is certified through CHA, we hope you can see the importance of not just choosing anyone off the Internet or at the recommendation of another person who does not ride themselves. To find a CHA instructor, visit HYPERLINK “http://www.CHAInstructors.com” https://cha.horse/

Stayed tuned to this blog for the next topic: How to find the best certified riding instructor for you.

Further Reading: Learn more about what it takes to begin riding with the book, Ready to Ride. This must-have book discusses how to choose a breed or riding style, looking for an instructor, what equipment you will need, how to lease a horse, cost factors, and more. Written with safety and the best education in mind, this book can be bought online at CHA’s store. HYPERLINK “http://cha-ahse.org/store/products/Ready_to_Ride_Book.html”

2013 CHA International Conference Speakers

2013 CHA International Conference Speakers

Katherine BarBarite

Katherine teaches a straight forward set of exercises that aide in the development of a calm confident horse and rider. No matter the skill level or discipline, these steps remove fear and resistance, elevating trust, communication and bond. Understanding the importance of herd structure and leadership to enhance safety and promote growth. Learn why bad timing and poor releases lead to unhappy and ridged horses. Most of all, ‘become more than a passenger, become a partner’.

 

Partnership & Confidence Building – Structured Foundation

Saturday – 9 a.m. – ShowPlex Arena

Master a straight forward set of exercises that builds a solid structured foundation. “Connecting with the mind and the feet will follow.” Keep heightened safety in mind. Replace fear and build confidence no matter the level, discipline, breed or age. Earn a higher level of trust, communication and bonding. Develop advanced concise communication and a better understanding of horse psychology and mechanics, as you develop improved timing, finesse, balance and feel for a harmonious relationship.

 

Lynn Bliven

Lynn-Bliven.jpgLynn is a Resource Educator with Cornell University Cooperative Extension. She began her career working as a 4-H Agent and is currently working in Agricultural Economic Development; specializing in beginning farmer outreach, local food systems and livestock production. Lynn and husband Shawn operate a 52 acre farm in Rushford, NY raising grass-fed beef, lamb and poultry.  A past board member of the Certified Horsemanship Association, Lynn is a certified Master Instructor and Clinic Staff Instructor.

 

Equine Forage Management Technique; There’s Gold in Those Fields

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn

Roundtable Discussions

With forage prices climbing, pasture management and hay evaluation are two topics equine facility managers need to be up-to-date on. Whether or not animals on the farm are for pleasure or part of the farm business, they are important to the operator. Pasture management and making or purchasing quality hay have direct impacts on animal health and wellbeing in addition to farm profitability. This session will cover the whys of managing pastures, how grazing affects plant growth, what influences plant nutrient content, composting manure, when to apply nutrients to fields and selection of the right hay to fit the individual needs of your horse herd.

Driving 101 and Preliminary Ground Driving

Saturday – 4 p.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

We will discuss the fundamentals of putting the horse before the cart. This step-by-step walk through will introduce participants to a safe and efficient way of driving a single harness horse. Topics to be covered include suitability, selecting harness & cart, getting the horse accustom to harness, pulling a load, along with other valuable advice for a safe and enjoyable experience driving your horse.

 

Josiah Brown

Josiah has traveled all over the country speaking, but he is no happier than when he is speaking in the horse industry which he loves. Josiah has owned a marketing and branding company in New York for 10 years and is the publisher of the new and forthcoming Western Dressage Magazine. Marketing and branding touches our lives every day. Josiah’s passion is to have fun while teaching businesses foundational concepts. Once you get a grasp of what is behind consumer’s habits and trust, you can make better decisions about how to attract customers to who you are.

 

How to Brand and Market Your Business Keynote

Thursday – 6 p.m. – Holiday Inn Ball Room

Josiah will have some fun and engage the audience in helping to bring a “Secret Marketing Formula” to the whole group. Marketing is nothing more than the study of common sense. This study can be broken down into tangible steps that will enable a potential customer to clearly recognize who you are.

 

Anne Brzezicki

Anne serves as Director of Equestrian Programs, and coaches the equestrian team at Middle Tennessee State University. Her background includes teaching at 4-H horse camps in CT and TN, competing in USEF, IHSA and AQHA shows, and coaching many youth, amateur, and Intercollegiate Horse Show Association national champions. She has recently begun hosting CHA certification clinics and thoroughly enjoys working with other teachers in an atmosphere of shared enthusiasm, knowledge and techniques.

 

Bending Exercises for Lateral Control

Friday – 1 p.m. – ShowPlex Arena

Help riders understand how to move the horse’s body parts and improve the flexibility of your school horses at the same time. Bending exercises help riders think about where and how to use their aids, and improve the horse’s response. Turns on the forehand and circles develop into lateral movements in an easy to follow progression.

 

Doug Emerson

Doug combined his expertise in small business strategy with his love of horses to create Profitable Horseman, a company dedicated to helping professional horsemen and horsewomen who are struggling with the business half of the horse business. With the help of 8 key strategies, Doug helps professionals focus on improving and shaping their businesses to create the businesses they have always wanted while maintaining a proper balance of work, rest and play. He has spoken at: American Morgan Horse Annual Convention, American Ranch Horse Annual Convention, USHJA Annual Convention, Kentucky Equine Network Association and has made numerous presentations and conducted workshops for horse organizations and clubs. Emerson writes a free electronic newsletter about the business of horses which is available for subscription at www.ProfitableHorseman.com. He has written articles for Cutting Horse ChatterIllinois Horse Network and Perfect Horse Magazine. Doug and his wife Betsey are the parents of six children and live in Lockport, New York on a 28 acre horse farm.

Riding Lesson Program Profit Analysis

Thursday – 2 p.m. – Holiday Inn

In this session, learn how to analyze and build your current program for improving profitability and plan for growth.

How to Publish an Electronic Newsletter For Your Clients And Future Clients

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Roundtable Discussions

A step-by-step approach to begin publishing a newsletter in less than 30 days will be discussed.

Understanding Horse Boarding Profitability and Its Contribution To Your Business

Friday – 10:30 a.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

In this presentation, tips on boarding profitability improvements and how to measure the benefit of boarding to your program will be analyzed.

 

Jim Glunt

Jim-glunt.jpgJim has been involved with horses for over 40 years. In the past, he has led the horse operation at a resort hotel, directed a youth camp with an extensive horse program, and worked as a farrier. Prior to retiring he offered a wide variety of support services to group horseback riding programs through Jim Glunt Equine Services. These services also included staff selection, development and training; program planning and development; risk reviews; site planning; plus tack and saddle repair. He has been involved with CHA since 1980, serving on the CHA Board and Executive Committee. In addition to CHA events, Jim has led workshops for a variety of regional and national groups, including the Pennsylvania Equine Council, the American Camp Association – Keystone Section, the YMCA, as well as the Pennsylvania State University. He is a CHA certified riding instructor and site visitor trainer and has had articles published in both The Instructor and Camping Magazine. He resides in central Pennsylvania with his wife Jill.

Staff and Horse Selection

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Roundtable Discussions

Critical points, considerations, sources and suggestions relative to these all-important program areas. Whether staff or horses — where do we find them? How do we qualify them? How do we keep them? What do we do when it is time for them to move on? We will discuss these and other topics.

Western Saddle Fit

Friday – 10:30 a.m. – Trail Encampment

An interactive workshop applying saddle fit principles for both horse and rider to group riding programs. It will include recommendations for saddles most suitable to group programs; fit for horse and rider; saddle rigging; seat measurement; and evaluating a used saddle. Various saddles and trees will be available as well as horses to demonstrate fitting principles.

 

Julie Goodnight

Julie-Goodnight.jpgJulie is the popular RFD-TV host of Horse Master airing Monday and Saturday nights. Julie travels the USA sharing her no-nonsense horsemanship training with riders of all disciplines. Whether you ride English, Western, dressage or trail ride, Julie’s “Classic Skills for a Natural Ride” teaching helps you feel more confident in the saddle and helps you understand the “whys” of horsemanship. She loves continually learning and sharing horse behavior insights and she relates that knowledge to how you should interact with your horses. She’s experienced in dressage and jumping, racing, reining, cow horse, colt-starting, and wilderness riding. You’ve probably seen her articles in Horse & Rider, The Trail Rider and many other horse publications. Julie is honored to be the International Spokesperson for the Certified Horsemanship Association and was named Equine Affaire’s Exceptional Equestrian Educator. Julie grew up on the hunter-jumper circuits in Florida, but is now at home in the west. She and her husband Rich Moorhead live in the mountains. Both love versatility ranch horse competitions and riding cow-horses.

Fun Unmounted Lessons to Improve Equitation

9 a.m. – Saturday – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

Balance, alignment, rhythm, using your aids—these are all skills that can easily be taught from the ground in fun and challenging exercises that anyone can do and that hone physical skills while giving the student a deeper understanding of theory.

All Skill Levels—All at Once

Saturday – Noon – ShowPlex Arena – Keynote

It’s not always about teaching to the lowest level of the group. What if you have to keep many different horses and riders challenged and learning in the same arena, all at the same time? One rider can barely control her horse, while another is competing at the highest level—this is what horsemanship clinicians do and it isn’t easy. Learn the tricks of rider/horse analysis, keeping riders challenged and teaching one skill at many different levels, all at the same time.

Leads, Departures and Lead Changes

Saturday – 4 p.m. – ShowPlex Arena

Ask an advanced rider what she wants to accomplish and chances are good that the response will be ‘flying lead changes.’ Learn how to teach leads and departures, deal with lead problems and check off the pre-requisite skills for flying lead changes.

 

Katie Gussenhofen

One of Katie’s earliest memories was going to a Grange supper, then being spirited away by her grandfather, still wearing her puffy little girl dress and patent leather shoes, to head to the pony auction. Thus began her love affaire with horses. In her twenties, Katie discovered ex-racehorses and eventing. 1996 found her as a spectator at Rolex where she met saddle maker, David Young. He turned a saddle upside down, cut it apart, and she was hooked. Katie then spent 10 years selling saddles for a major manufacturer and worked with Olympic riders in every discipline involving English saddles. She has reflocked saddles and currently balances all makes of saddles. Katie has also been trained in equine massage, mainly as it relates to biomechanics.

English Saddle Fit

Saturday – 9 a.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

This presentation will review the ten points of saddle fit and how saddle design affects rider position and impacts instructor effectiveness.

 

Susan E. Harris

Susan is an international clinician and equestrian author, artist, and educator, teaching Centered Riding, biomechanics and anatomy and horsemanship clinics to riders of all breeds and disciplines. Her unique demonstration, “Anatomy in Motion: The Visible Horse,” in which she paints the bones and muscles on a live horse, has been a popular attraction at equine expos and clinics around the world, from Australia and Japan to Europe. Susan is a Level IV (Advanced) Centered Riding clinician and has been honored as a Master Instructor by the American Riding Instructor Association. Susan Harris is the author/illustrator of Horse Gaits, Balance, and Movement, Grooming to Win, CHA Composite Manual of Horsemanship and the U.S. Pony Club Manuals of Horsemanship, and has produced Anatomy in Motion I: The Visible Horse and Anatomy in Motion II: The Visible Rider as DVDs. She has also illustrated books on equine biomechanics for Dr Hilary Clayton and Dr Gerd Heuschmann. Susan’s study of equine and human anatomy and movement, artist’s eye and experience as an instructor, trainer and judge, give her a unique perspective on horses, riders and how they move. You can visit Susan Harris online at www.anatomyinmotion.com.

How Horses Move: Understanding Equine Biomechanics and How It Relates to School Horses

Friday – 2:30 p.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

Susan shows the basics of how horses move, good movement and damaging movement, and practical approaches to helping your horses move their best and stay sound and healthy in a lesson program.

Equine Anatomy Workshop

Saturday – Noon – Training Arena in Barn 9

A hands-on approach to equine anatomy: discuss the equine skeleton and muscular system, questions & answers, and help paint the Visible Horse.

Anatomy in Motion: The Visible Horse

Saturday – 2:30 p.m. – ShowPlex Arena

Come and watch the Visible Horse in motion and learn horse anatomy and how horses move.

Beyond “Heels Down”–What Do We Really Teach?

Saturday – 7 p.m. – Holiday Inn Ball Room

Come and join us for the CHA Annual Awards Banquet and hear Susan Harris do a keynote speech directed to riding instructors.

 

Kathie Hilsher

Kathie lives on a small hobby farm in Houghton, NY with her husband, two kids, and two horses. She currently teaches in the English department at Houghton College. She grew up riding at Houghton College Equestrian Center and there connected with CHA, took her first certification clinic when she turned 18, and followed with a second certification clinic at the age of 21 in hopes of being a clinic instructor. Since then she has taught lessons privately, worked several clinics, began judging, started volunteering at the Allegany County 4-H horse program, and taken on the task of teaching her kids responsible and safe horsemanship—the most important job of all.

Partnering with 4-H

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Roundtable Discussions

Are the mission, vision, and objectives of CHA and the 4-H Horse program compatible? How can we partner together with 4-H as riding instructors to enhance the 4-H horse program in our own areas? How can the two organizations benefit from each other? We will use this round table discussion time to look for answers to these questions and begin brainstorming ways we can serve and partner to train up safer, more effective young horse people.

 

Teresa Kackert

Teresa has been CHA Clinic Instructor since 2003. She is also Chris Irwin Natural Horsemanship ‘Double-Gold’ Certified and a Richard Shrake Resistance Free Riding Master Level Trainer/Instructor. Teresa is the creator of the ‘Soft Touch’ Training Program – Classical Equitation & Natural Horsemanship and has over 20 years professional experience as a rider, competitor, trainer, instructor, clinician and personal coach. She is founder of Great Horses of America, Consignment Horse Sales company and Co-Founder of Pink Heart Pony Kids, Inc. Teresa specializes in: confidence building in both horse and rider, horse behavior modification, motivational personal coaching and skill enhancement for riders & horses of all levels and disciplines. www.GreatHorses.org.

‘Soft Touch’ Horsemanship Equine Communication Demystified

Thursday – 2 p.m. – Holiday Inn

Learn the subtleties of effectively communicating with your horse in every situation; applies to in hand and under saddle work. ‘Listen’ and ‘speak’ with your mind & body; verbal & nonverbal skills both you and your horse have and use at all times. Understand ‘what’ your horse is telling you and ‘what’ you are telling him. THEY ‘see’ and THEY ‘say’ it ALL! It is our job to ‘translate’.

‘Soft Touch’ Horsemanship Equine Performance Skills

Saturday – 1 p.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

Put into practice the communication techniques learned above in Part 1. Fine tune & apply your equine communication skills both verbal and nonverbal. Continue to develop your equine vocabulary and ‘translation’ expertise. What are you really ‘saying’ to him: with merely your physical presence or your natural riding aids—leg, hands, seat, voice. Does he hear me? Is he even listening! Does he understand me? Uh oh… ’do I understand him?’

 

Mike King

Mike is a managing Partner at Capri Insurance Ltd. and is responsible for the development and management of various equine insurance programs across Canada. As of today, over 50,000 equine industry participants are protected by Capri’s unique programs. Mike has been involved in the horse industry in one way or another since childhood. He has shown on the “A” circuit, judged horse shows, raised and trained horses for himself and clients and managed facilities which offered a variety of services to competitors and recreational riders alike. Mike is well known as the ‘Insurance Guy’ in the Canadian equine community. In addition to running the brokerage in Aurora, Ontario; Mike teaches a course on equine risk management at the University of Guelph and regularly publishes articles addressing insurance topics in various publications. Mike has over forty years of experience involved in the horse industry and twenty years in the equine insurance industry. His background provides unique insight and understanding of the life we lead and the risks we face with our equine partners – regardless of geography. Insurance for Horses & Their People – It’s what we do!

Risk Management

Saturday – 1 p.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

The specialized insurance products that all people who own horses should understand. Liability and the equine professional / facility operator – they can’t sue me – can they?

 

Karolina LaBrecque

Karolina holds a Ph.D in Physical Rehabilitation and MS in Psychology. She has 20+ years of horse experience and 10+ in hippotherapy /therapeutic riding experience. Karolina holds PATH International and CHA certifications in USA and hippotherapy/ able body certifications in Poland. In her carrier as educator and mentor she introduced over 300 students to the field of EAAT. Besides involvement in the horse world she in an international speaker, life coach and psychology adjunct professor at the local collage. In her free time she teaches fencing and is involved in K-9 Search and Rescue Team.

Why Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) Work

Saturday – 10:30 a.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

Directed at THR instructors, horseback riding instructors, hippotherapists, volunteers and parents this presentation is intended to broaden understanding of EAAT and show the science behind it. The scope of EAAT, biomechanics of horse movement, influence of horse on the rider, therapeutic qualities of the horse, the therapeutic process and current research in the field will be covered.

 

Roxanne Lawrence

Roxanne is the current Executive Director of the Interscholastic Equestrian Association, and she is an initial founding member of that association.  Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, her equestrian experience started in the world of hunt seat riding.  She spent several years as a trainer and instructor, and ultimately moved into horse show management with positions at The National Horse Show (Madison Square Garden), WEF, HITS, Capitol Challenge, 1996 Atlanta Olympics, and many other notable events around the country.  She went on to manage the Andrews School Equestrian Center for 10 years in the Cleveland, Ohio area where she currently resides.

How Can my Equine Business Get Involved w/Interscholastic Equestrian Association

Thursday – 2 p.m. – Holiday Inn

The Interscholastic Equestrian Association was founded in 2002.  Just 10 years later, it boasts over 8,000 members who participate in two primary disciplines of Hunt Seat Equitation and Western Horsemanship/Reining.  With its draw-based format, the IEA offers competitive opportunities to riders in grades 6-12 that may not own a horse, and it offers significant opportunities for growing your business and attracting new clientele to your lesson program.  What are the benefits to your business and your clients? How do you get involved?  Come to this session to learn all about the Interscholastic Equestrian Association.

 

Amy Long-Mount DVM

Amy earned her BS in large animal science from Delaware Valley College and her DVM from Purdue University. Amy has special interest in equine dentistry and complementary medicine. In 2006 she completed the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society course in veterinary acupuncture and believes in using both traditional and alternative medicines to keep horses willing and able to perform their best. Amy and her husband also run a horse boarding business in Cuba, NY.

Equine Acupuncturist/Dentistry

Saturday – 2:30 p.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

Horses by nature are very accommodating animals and most “bad” behaviors can be explained as the horse’s way of trying to ask (sometimes demand) help. As horse owners, riders and trainers it is our responsibility to hear what they are trying to tell us and help them find the right answer. Acupuncture and dentistry are two modalities that can be used to help us to help them. Acupuncture is part of traditional Chinese medicine and operates on the philosophy that bodily functions and athletic performance are dependent on the smooth flow of energy throughout the body. Any interference or interruption in that energy flow can disrupt normal function, leading to disease. By placing tiny needles at very specific locations we can stimulate the flow of energy and return the body to its properly balanced state. Equine Dentistry has made huge jumps forward over the last 15 years and is a necessity for safety, good health and maximum performance. Getting your horse’s teeth “floated” involves much more than rasping off sharp points with a file. Discussions on what it means to properly “balance” the equine mouth and how dental health impacts performance and quality of life.

 

Reba Martinez

Having grown up around horses, Reba barrel raced and competed in play days as a child. As a young adult, she worked as a pharmacy technician in hospitals at night and exercised race horses early in the morning. She went on to a professional career in the horse racing industry as a jockey for 8 years and licensed trainer for 10 years. She and her husband, Larry, founded Blue Streak Stables, a horsemanship camp that teaches girls 7 to 15 years old all about horses. They learn to care for horses and are taught the foundations of riding. As a CHA instructor for 10 years, Reba is very qualified and has imparted a love of horses in many girls.

Understanding New Technology in Treating Colic

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Round Table Discussions

Through years of working with horses, particularly the older horses at the stables, Reba has seen her share of colic cases. She has appeared as a guest speaker at numerous events. She has a wonderful flair in teaching to help horse owners understand the digestive tract of horses, how each of these different types of colic affect the horse with signs and symptoms. Vital signs and assessments are important and how to achieve these before calling your vet. Through new technology, discovery of a revolutionary way for every horse owner to treat colic where in 30 minutes gut sounds return. It is 100% effective on impactions, light sand, spasm, gas colics and also treatment of diarrhea. Participants will learn how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of colic and how to effectively treat it quickly and easily. Learn about the equine digestive tract anatomy. Learn the cause, prevention and different types of colic and how it affects the digestive tract.

 

Dan McCarthy

Working with horses since he was 14, Dan’s thinking and therefore his training has evolved to a place of oneness with the horse. Through private lessons, group lessons and clinics, Dan makes this experience accessible to anyone who desires to have that kind of intimate connection with their horse. Dan is certified as a Richard Shrake Resistance Free TM Trainer and is committed to Bill Dorrance’s teachings: making the right thing obvious, setting things up for success, and working within the horse’s timeline. When not training or caring for his own herd at his home Little T Ranch in Hobart, NY, Dan provides his time and talents to help rehabilitate horses for adoption through Rosemary Farm Sanctuary in S. Kortright, NY.

Understanding the Timing of a Horse Through Music

Saturday – 10:30 a.m. – ShowPlex Arena

The magic of this program comes from you tapping in to the rhythmic nature of your horse. We accomplish this using music to explain the footfall and song to obtain the rhythmic harmony – an elegant dance – between you and your horse. The musical pulse is used to move the horse, rather than driving or pressure. Selected songs as well as spontaneous compositions are used to create the natural, rhythmic communication between you and your horse.

 

Valerie McCloskey

Valerie is the trainer and instructor at Whisper Wind and a USDF Bronze and Silver Medalist, awards she earned on horses that she trained herself. Valerie is working towards her Gold Medal and has competed at Intermediare with scores in the mid 60s. She has been riding since she was a child and has competed in Western, Huntseat and Dressage. Valerie has obtained accreditation and certification through CHA where she has earned her Master Instructor and ACI certifications. Valerie also coached an IHSA team for 5 years and brought them from 15 to 7th place in a very competitive region. She trains horses and riders of all levels, breeds and disciplines with emphasis on a correct foundation. Valerie is available for private, semi-private and group lessons.

Semi-Private Dressage Lessons

Friday – 9 a.m. – ShowPlex Arena – $$Extra Fee Required

Exercises for Half Halt and Position

Friday – 1 p.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

This will be an unmounted session. In this session we will discuss the theory of and types of half halts and why and when you would use them. We will discuss the riders’ position and the importance of it in applying the half halts.

How to Ride and Teach the Counter Canter

Saturday – 1 p.m. – ShowPlex Arena

We will discuss and explore the steps and preparation leading up to the counter canter including being able to position the haunches and control the shoulders, as well as the theory behind why we do it and how to execute the counter canter.

 

Mark Munzert

Mark is a proud cowboy and equine author and story-teller that appreciates and promotes the traditional, value-centric, measured evolution and down to earth ways of life with horses. Comfortable in the classroom, ‘at home’ in the saddle, or around the campfire, his brand of info-tainment is thought provoking, tear inducing and laugh producing.  Mark operates HorseSurrounds, a provider of indoor arenas and equine barns. You can reach him at www.cowpokescorral.com.

Cowboy Poetry

Saturday – CHA Awards Banquet – 7:00 p.m. – Holiday Inn Ball Room

 

Dale Myler

Dale and his brothers Ron and Bob are third generation horsemen, and are three of the world’s leading bit designers. Because of Dale’s extensive research into equine dentistry and equine physiology, the Mylers have been able to bring an added understanding of the connection between bitting and the equine mouth to their designs. Dale has done bitting clinics and seminars all over the US and in the following countries: Sweden, Wales, England, Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Switzerland and Austria. In 2006, Dale was given the privilege of conducting a seminar at the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace.

Bits and Bitting Practical

Friday – 10:30 a.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

During this arena demonstration, Dale will provide an overview of the bit selection process: identifying resistance and evaluating individual horses; introducing and transitioning the horse and rider to a new bit; and following up with an evaluation of the horse and further instruction for the rider. A basic knowledge of the Myler bitting philosophy as found in the Myler book, The Level Best for Your Horse, will be helpful but not required.

 

Ken Najorka

With over thirty years of horsemanship experience, Ken lives in Central Florida as an active reining instructor, but knows that good horsemanship and equitation are simply that, no matter the discipline. Ken’s experience as a coach and clinician reaches beyond the show pen. The work has taken him to many parts of the country and allowed him to work with a variety of individuals and horses. Ken is a CHA certified instructor and the Region 7 Director. He has worked as an instructor for Dennis Reis Universal Horsemanship that can be seen on RFD-TV. Najorka Performance Horses, LLC encompasses: starting horses, problem solving, and fine tuning the well trained horse. From the beginner to the show pen, Ken prides himself on building a better horse-rider partnership. From teaching basic horsemanship to working with various jurisdictions of mounted police in safety training, Ken blends his knowledge of reining horses and natural horsemanship to help fill communication gaps between all types of horses and riders. Ken is available to conduct seminars, demonstrations and lessons throughout the year. Quality horses are available for sale or lease. You can contact Ken at najorkaperformancehorse@gmail.com

Balance of Horse and Rider

Friday – 2:30 p.m. – ShowPlex Arena

Confidence, forward and balance – how important are they?

 

Jill Paxton

Having grown up attending horse shows with her mother when she was judging, Jill’s involvement with horses has been lifelong. Currently as the Director of Equestrian Studies and Equine Management for The University of Findlay, Jill supervises both their English and Western Programs. Jill’s daughter Shannon Paxton-Hannasch is the third generation showing horses. Horses out of Jill’s training program are APHA World, Paint Congress, Pinto World, and Buckskin Congress Champions. Jill retired multiple AHSA/USEF judging cards. She currently holds judging cards with POAC, APHA, ABRA, ApHC, PtHA, Iowa Ranch Horse Association, Iowa 4H, and Iowa Open shows.

Exercises to Prepare Your Students to Jump

Friday – 10:30 a.m. – ShowPlex Arena

This presentation will discuss how to strengthen your student’s foundation skills and position leading up to jumping. A variety of exercises will be introduced utilizing bounce lines and grid work to help develop the student’s eye and timing. Open discussion will be encouraged.

Stops on a Western Horse

Friday – 2:30 p.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

The topic of this presentation will present the steps leading up to stopping a western horse. Specifically focusing on the importance of transitions and that they are important throughout all disciplines. Additionally the progression for teaching a stop will be outlined using different modalities and discussing various learning styles. Open discussion will be invited.

 

Shellie Pilato

Currently the Equestrian Director for the Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan, Shellie began her professional riding career over 30 years ago starting colts and ponies in her father’s stable. Her background in various disciplines and areas of the equine industry were instrumental to forming her career with horses. Shellie designs and implements riding programs where the focus is on safe interaction with horses in a welcoming environment. Her passion is targeting and building solid beginner safe horses and helping instructors develop their skill, in and out of the arena. In her free time, Shellie serves on the CHA Board of Directors, works as Clinic Staff and continues to develop her own riding and training skills.

Teaching Techniques for Riding Instructors

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Roundtable Discussions

This roundtable environment is an opportunity to explore the basic techniques of teaching and discuss creative ideas of reaching and engaging your students. Develop a better understanding of lesson planning and safe lesson set up, share what happens to be working for your program, or pick the brains of other professionals to help get your creative juices flowing. The topics to discuss could be endless and entertaining.

Putting the FUN Back Into Riding Fundamentals

Saturday – 2:30 p.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

Sometimes in our pursuit of riding, we often lose sight of the fact that at one time, riding was FUN. This class is a way to help put the FUN back into your Riding Fundamentals by exploring different topics and horsemanship through mounted games. Keep students engaged and learning. Bring school horses off of the rail get them thinking and tuned back into their rider. Help instructors regain creative & safe teaching methods and breathe life back into the riding program. Beth Powers and Shellie will discuss safe use & introduction of props, creative use of mounted games and will make available resources and lists of games known to help students reach their goals.

 

Heidi Potter

Heidi is a full time instructor, trainer and clinician with over 40 years of horse experience in several disciplines. Her program, “In Harmony With Horses”, is designed to improve the relationship between horses and humans. Using Natural Horsemanship techniques her work starts on the ground and then progresses to under saddle. She currently competes in the NE Stock Horse Show Series and works with gaited horses at two Vermont facilities. Ms. Potter is a Level III Centered Riding© Instructor/Clinician and a CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Instructor as well as the 2010 CHA Clinic Instructor of the Year. She teaches, trains and conducts clinics throughout the country, as well as at her family’s southern Vermont farm, Maple Ridge Stable. To learn more about Ms. Potter, her programs and clinics please visit www.InHarmonyWithHorses.com

Horse Agility Training Seminar

Friday – 9 a.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

The IHA (International Horse Agility Club) was founded in the United Kingdom by Vanessa Bee, author of The Horse Agility Handbook and the newly released DVD -Horse Agility-The DVD. The club’s purpose is to promote a safe, fun and unique competition experience for humans and horses of various ages, levels, abilities and breeds. Horse Agility offers a venue for people who cannot or do not ride horses and have a desire to compete. It also serves as a way to keep older or rehabbing horses mentally, physically and emotionally engaged. It is an ideal activity for camps, lesson programs, therapeutic riding programs or simply anyone who wants to enjoy a new activity and improve the overall relationship they share with their horse. A slideshow will be used to share information about the sport of Horse Agility. It is done on the ground with a strong emphasis on good horsemanship, improving communication and achieving a mutually respectful partnership with the horse. The goal in agility is to progress to working the obstacles at liberty. In addition to developing a good set of skills on the ground the handler must be mindful and have a solid understanding of equine behavior. The goal is to achieve clear communication and the ability to move your horse through the use of body language, not through applying pressure. (No sticks, whips or flags allowed in competition). The only two rules for this sport are that it must be SAFE and it must be FUN-for You and Your Horse!

Horse Agility Training Starter Course

Saturday – 10:30 a.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

This presentation will begin with reviewing basic ground skills needed for agility and an introduction to some of the obstacles.

 

Beth Powers

Beth-and-rosie-2011.jpgBeth Powers has been a CHA instructor for over 20 years many of these including being a member of the CHA board of directors. She has an education degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She has presented topics at CHA International and Regional Conferences, American Youth Horse Council Symposium and at Equine Affaire Ohio. Beth was asked to be the Keynote speaker at the Wisconsin State 4-H conference and her topics included teaching techniques and the process in which people learn different skills. She holds a membership in AQHA and has received a Professional Horsemanship distinction. Beth is a CHA Site Trainer and Visitor and is currently serving as the CHA Vice President.

Putting the FUN Back Into Riding Fundamentals

Saturday – 2:30 p.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

Sometimes in our pursuit of riding, we often lose sight of the fact that at one time, riding was FUN. This class is a way to help put the FUN back into your Riding Fundamentals by exploring different topics and horsemanship through mounted games. Keep students engaged and learning. Bring school horses off of the rail get them thinking and tuned back into their rider. Help instructors regain creative & safe teaching methods and breathe life back into the riding program. Shellie Pilato and Beth will discuss safe use & introduction of props, creative use of mounted games and will make available resources and lists of games known to help students reach their goals.

 

Heather Sansom

Heather is a rider biomechanics and conditioning specialist. She is a certified elite Personal Trainer, Centered Riding® Instructor and Equine Canada Competition Coach. A lifelong rider, she has trained in Dressage at Level 4 and is proud of having done at least one barrel race in her life, taken polo lessons, and hunted with hounds. Heather’s personal cross-training program varies according to season to include activities for cardiovascular, strength, core and flexibility training. She hikes, and trains in martial arts and dance for overall conditioning and to improve rhythm and co-ordination. In a project management role with the Equine Canada, she was responsible for the development of the national equestrian coaching and riding curriculums and certifications. She is recognized for her innovation in remodeling the equestrian adaptation of the Long Term Athlete Development sport model. Heather owns Equifitt and you can find out more at www.equifitt.com.

Athletic Development of the Rider and Fitness Exercises

Saturday – 4 p.m. – Showplex Club House Seminar Room

National programs in all 67 major sports in Canada are aligned with the Canadian model for long-term athlete development (LTAD). For many sports, including equestrian, sport-specific models have been developed to create a coherent framework for designing programming that meets the needs of riders of all ability levels, from recreational and beginner riders, to elite performance. The model is based on sport science related to natural developmental phases and windows of opportunity for skill acquisition. The principles of each stage help riding instructors and coaches with more tools for ensuring their students get the best preparation possible for the next stage of their development. This workshop will provide an overview of the framework, how it is useful for equestrian instructors, and provide some opportunity for peer discussion and sharing. Fitness helps a rider with more accurate aids and less risk of injury regardless of whether the goal is pure enjoyment or high performance. Coaches and instructors that understand the basic elements of rider fitness are better able to help guide their students toward health and fitness choices which contribute to achievement of their riding goals. In some cases, the riding instructor may be that student’s most significant influence on health and fitness at that moment. This talk will provide an overview of rider fitness, touching on important muscle groups, movement patterns, considerations based on seasonal training plan, and common postural issues and compensating patterns.

 

Mitzi Summers

Mitzi has been an instructor and trainer for many years. She is the recipient of the 2010 CHA Instructor of the Year Award, a Level IV Centered Riding Instructor, and a judge for the A.J.A. Mitzi works with all disciplines and all breeds of horses, and specializes in “problem” horses, using only positive reinforcement in her methods to rehabilitate horses. Mitzi has certified hundreds of instructors for CHA, and also travels internationally to teach instructor and training workshops for Centered Riding and also for SUMMERS E.T. (Summers Equine Theory). This program has been developed to educate riders, trainers and instructors in the classical, non-abusive methods of working with horses that has been established for centuries. Mitzi has traveled to Europe, South Africa, New Zealand and throughout the United States sharing her years of expertise to make the lives of horses and their riders happier and more meaningful.

Centered Riding

Friday – 1 p.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

Using images, knowledge of the biomechanics of horse and rider, and how horses learn and understand, this session will be addressing each horse and rider combination as unique entities. The goal for the session is that each rider and horse will have improved in performance and understanding. The only way that we can communicate with our horses correctly is through our bodies and correct use of the natural aids. Weight incorrectly distributed, mixed signals, tension or stiffness in the body of the rider can all result in confusion and even apprehension in the horse. Centered Riding allows each rider to become familiar with how to use their bodies correctly when they ride. “Hands On” work is used when appropriate to better the understanding of each rider on how to communicate to the best of their ability with their horse. Mitzi will encourage the audience to come into the arena at times to learn first-hand some of the more common procedures and body work that are the most helpful with riders.

 

Jennifer Willey

Jennifer-Willey.jpgJennifer is a CHA master instructor and clinic staff with a bachelor’s degree in marketing and sales. She currently works in Minnesota.

 

 

Social Media and How to Harness It

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Roundtable Discussions

Are you utilizing social media? If not, you should be! Social media such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn is no longer a trend; it has become a valid marketing, communications and networking business tool that is free to use! This discussion will talk about some tips to navigating the technology, communicating with your fans and how to grow your business following.

 

Terry Williams

Terry is a 1984 graduate of Otterbein College in Ohio with a Bachelor’s Degree in Equine Science and Stable Management. Terry has been a Clinic Instructor with CHA since 1988, and a certified riding instructor with CHA since 1985, earning her ACI rating in 1986. Terry is also a Clinic Instructor for The Equine Facility Management Program, a certified Overnight guide, a Site Visitor, a past Region 4 Director, and currently a CHA Board of Directors Member. She has been on the Approved List of Ohio 4-H Judges since 1995. Terry has taught both in year round residential camps and privately. She currently specializes in teaching Problem Riders vs. Problem Horses. Terry graduated from nursing school in June 2009 and has been practicing as a registered nurse since then in a large hospital in northern Cincinnati. Previous to nursing school, Terry managed a large thoroughbred breeding and training farm for ten years. She resides with her family in Blanchester, Ohio.

Conformation Form to Function

Friday – 9 a.m. – Training Arena in Barn 9

When we look to buy a house we hire someone to see if it is structurally sound. When buying a horse it should be the same. Would you like to be able to predict what your horse’s potential lameness/unsoundness issues would be in the future? This is one reason we hire a vet for a pre-purchase exam. Yet, wouldn’t it be nice to wean out some of our prospects? Conformation does not have to be frightening or overwhelming. Attend this session and decide if you should place your horse in the halter class at the local show after you learn how to size up your competition. Yet, keep in mind that most horses have flaws and how we deal with these flaws helps us in the longevity of our horse’s career. Learn how to evaluate form to function of your prospects and choose the horse that will best meet your individual needs.

 

Jeff Wilson

“Starting young horses, reschooling problem horses, and putting people together with their own horses successfully are all pursuits that I have focused on.” With a thirty year professional career, Jeff furthered a love for all breeds of horses through the training and pursuit of natural horsemanship and dressage, a study which has naturally evolved into Western Dressage. Bringing the west coast explosion, Western Dressage, to the east coast has been Jeff’s mission and goal since its formal creation in 2010. Now, as a Western Dressage clinician, Jeff’s goal has been to help western people learn and teach their own horses the tools that have been developed through the centuries. Jeff has bred, raised, trained and shown his Morgans for almost 35 years. His bloodline, Black Willow Morgans, was featured at the World Equestrian Games where Jeff presented his two Morgan stallions.

Western Dressage Keynote

Friday – Noon – ShowPlex Arena

The western working horse has been the backbone of our country. Helping that horse be a better riding horse through the timeless principles of dressage is my mission statement. Bringing to the horse a longer useful life, bringing to the rider the highest level of horsemanship they desire.

 

JoAnne Young

JoAnne-Young.jpgJoAnne has been teaching riding and training horses for over 40 years, and is happy that she is still learning. Every student and every horse bring fresh challenges that keep life interesting. She has been privileged and blessed beyond her wildest dreams to study with such wonderful instructors as Walter Zettl (dressage coach to Canadian event team when they won bronze at Los Angeles Olympics), Bertin Potter in Germany, Molly Sivewright (FEI judge and past chair of the Fellows of the British Horse Society), Carel Eijkenaar (FEI judge), Eddo Hoestra (FEI Trainer) and Doris Halstead (Physical Therapist and author of “Releasing the Potential: Physical Therapy Modalities for Horse and Rider.”) Jo-Anne is the author of the M.A. thesis: “Preparing students for riding instructor certification through college curricula.”

Eventing Courses

Thursday – 3:30 p.m. – Holiday Inn Roundtable Discussions

Designing and building multi-level cross country obstacles; using available materials to construct sturdy, safe cross country jumps; preserving jumps for future seasons will all be discussed.

Semi-Private Dressage Lessons

Friday – 9 a.m. – ShowPlex Arena – $$Extra Fee Required

 

Walter Zettl

Born in Czechoslovakia in 1929, Walter was trained in Germany, working for many years under the esteemed Col. Aust, for whom he eventually became First Assistant in 1955. He received many honors through the years, including the German Federation’s Gold Riding Medal, for which he was the youngest ever recipient at the age of 21. He received his Reitlehrer certification after reaching the minimum age of 25. In 1981 he moved to Canada, where he continued his lifelong pursuit of teaching horses and riders, including coaching the Canadian Olympic Three-Day Event team in dressage for the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. He has written many articles for German and US publications (such as USDF Connections and Dressage Today in the US, St. George Dressage magazine in Germany, etc.) and has authored 3 books: Dressage in Harmony (also published in Germany), The Circle of Trust, and the newest, Ask Walter. His teachings and insights are also available in the DVD series “A Matter of Trust”.

Welcome to New York Keynote Address

Thursday – 1 p.m. – CHA Annual Meeting – Holiday Inn

Got Kicked by My Horse

By Christy Landwehr

THE INCIDENT

It was a beautiful fall day in Colorado. The event was the second annual Trail-A-Thon benefit ride for Front Range Exceptional Equestrians. The ride was held in Lory State Park, a nearby foothills and mountain park with varied terrain. It was well planned with different trails selected for riders with disabilities, hikers, and other riders. For the safety of the riders with disabilities and their families and caregivers, trailers were parked well away from the staging area. After Judy rode, she grabbed a quick bite to eat and then took her tired horse, Sparky, back to the trailer for water and to load up for the trip home.

Judy removed Sparky’s tack by the door of the truck and tied him to the side of the trailer. Then she climbed onto the rear bumper of the truck to get his water bucket — a full 5-gallon bucket with a tight lid — out of the truck bed. As she wrestled the bucket over the tailgate and went to step down, she caught her heel in the electric cable between the truck and trailer and fell flat on her back, flinging the 40-pound bucket into Sparky’s rear end as she did so. It was a pretty good mountain lion attack simulation and Sparky responded with a kick. As she was landing hard on her back and head, he was landing a hard kick to her upper right arm. Judy saw stars for about ten minutes, having struck her head. Fortunately, she had not yet removed her helmet so was not knocked out. Surprisingly, Judy’s arm didn’t hurt immediately and she was able to water the horse, load her tack and horse, call for help, and get Sparky home and put up before being in too much distress. Judy was lucky and sustained no broken bones or a concussion, only insignificant separation of the shoulder joint.

The Analysis

There are several lessons to be learned from this mishap. Although it was a good idea to park trailers away from the foot traffic of riders with disabilities at this event, there was some risk that a horse handler could be injured while alone at the trailers. In Judy’s case, she was not visible to other participants and, had she been seriously injured, she could have been unaided for some time; this is both a personal and organizational concern. Judy could have mitigated this risk herself by asking one of her fellow riders to accompany her back to her trailer and then she could have handed the water bucket to that person.

Judy could have opened the tailgate of the truck to take the water bucket out instead of trying to dead lift it over the closed tailgate. She also could have had her water supply in the trailer’s tack box instead of in the truck bed or could have had the water in numerous smaller containers.

The fact that Judy was wearing her helmet while working with her horse on the ground was a very positive aspect of this scenario. Often, we think about putting our helmet on after we are done grooming and tacking and before we ride and then taking it off immediately after we dismount. Many youth programs have riders wear their helmets from the moment they step onto the stable grounds. This is a good idea for all ages and abilities of riders as incidents do happen on the ground around horses as well.

Editor’s Note: CHA wants to thank CHA member Judy Jaffe of Wellington, CO for her submission of this incident that we can all greatly benefit and learn from. If you have an incident that you would like to share for possible submission, please contact the Editor of The Instructor, Christy Landwehr, at clandwehr@CHA.horse .

Feeding by Yourself

By Julie Goodnight

THE INCIDENT

It was a typical afternoon feeding; I had a bridal shower to go to; so I had my mind on getting the feeding done and getting out of there. The farm owner and I loaded up the hay bales in the back of the tractor’s trailer and headed out to the fields to distribute the hay.

My horse, Red, is an older, docile, gentle gelding who has never been known to kick anyone before or since. My 4-year-old niece rides him and he is very popular with my younger riding students. He is excessively cute, and people-oriented. That morning my farrier had been by to trim his hooves, and we both noticed he was very grumpy; pinning his ears and “sulking”. The weather had been gloomy, and having to compete with 12 other horses in his field, even though it is a large field, I think, was taking a toll on his usually happy nature. Red is a bit spoiled and prefers one – on – one attention and feed also.

I got out of the tractor to fill the 100 gal. water tank, which sits next to an open gate that connects two fields. As I headed back to the tractor, my horse, Red passed through the gate. As he did, I reached out to pat him on the butt, without thinking. The next thing I know, I was in at the emergency room with my Mom, who was telling me that my beloved horse had kicked my face in.

Apparently, as I reached out to pet my horse, he kicked out, hitting me in the mouth, sending me flying through the air onto the back of my head. I had a concussion, deep, multiple lacerations to my mouth and lips, and four damaged teeth. I spent all night and the next morning in an ambulance and two different hospitals, having my face surgically repaired.

THE ANALYSIS

Of course, there is so much that could have been done to prevent this from happening, and as one who preaches safety to my students all of the time, I felt really dumb for not doing something about my unsafe feeding habits long before:

Keeping the horses out of the field I was putting hay in by closing the connection gate and opening it after I was done. It requires an extra step, but it is the conscientious and safe thing to do.
Not approaching my horse from behind and surprising him; knowing that a horse’s natural instinct is to kick out when surprised from behind. Horses can be touchy during feeding times, and it is even easier to startle them when their focus is elsewhere.
I am reconsidering feeding by myself in the mornings. If it had been a morning incident, it would have been hours and hours before I was missed and discovered. Although there may be times when feeding by yourself is unavoidable, I’ll make sure that I am extra cautious when that happens.
Haste makes waste; it never pays to get in a hurry around horses. Needless to say, I never made it to the bridal shower!
I am sure there are many other areas in which I can improve the safety at feeding time and I recognize now that I had become complacent. Just because “I’ve always done it that way,” doesn’t make it safe. One thing we have all learned in working with horses over the years, is that what can go wrong, will go wrong, eventually.

Editor’s Note: Normally this column includes true stories that have been fictionalized. This article is a true story written in the words of the victim, with editorial assistance from the author… Thank you for sharing stories that will prevent others from being hurt. If you have a story you would like to share, please email it to us at office@CHA.horse

Socially CHA: Connecting with the Certified Horsemanship Association

By Sarah Evers Conrad

The Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) offers many ways to connect online and receive information and updates on the organization’s events and programs. CHA works hard to keep members and non-members informed and to share educational materials. For those who want to receive CHA’s updates, there are a variety of ways to connect online with us that are listed below. In addition, we have listed important sections of the CHA website that are updated frequently with important news and information.

One of the best ways to connect with CHA is the monthly e-newsletter. Each e-newsletter has updates from CHA, links to important information, discount opportunities, job postings, upcoming radio show announcements, CHA events, and more. If you want to receive the newsletter straight to your email inbox, subscribe on the left-hand side of the CHA website. http://cha-ahse.org/

Facebook Page: CHA’s Facebook page is a favorite among members and non-members. With almost 8,000 Fans, the page offers updates on CHA events, such as certification clinics and the annual conference, details on the CHA Radio Show guests that appear on Horses in the Morning every third Tuesday of the month. In addition, the Facebook page shares interesting information for horse owners, riding instructors, and riders. We also share posts made by CHA’s partners, which were discussed in last month’s blog post (link to last month’s post).
https://www.facebook.com/CHAinstructors

There is also a Facebook page dedicated to the CHA International Conference at https://www.facebook.com/events/807480385976674/. Other events have their own pages, too. There is a list of events on the CHA fan page’s Events Tab or you can go to https://www.facebook.com/CHAinstructors/events. These events include Skills Clinics, Certification Clinics, the Horses in the Morning Radio Show with CHA, webinars, and more.

Facebook Closed Group: In addition to CHA’s main fan page, CHA has a private group that people can request to join. Members of the group are also active in sharing useful content with their fellow group members. It’s a very interactive experience and a way to get to know other CHA members.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/45943538052/

For additional Facebook experiences based on regions, please see below.

YouTube: Another of CHA’s main social media channels is our YouTube channel. There CHA has 60+ videos on horsemanship and safety topics. To encourage education in horsemanship, CHA encourages anyone to embed the videos on their website. On the CHA YouTube channel, you can learn how to perform a horse safety check, how to fit a helmet, pack and trail riding essentials, how to put horse boots on a horse’s legs, how to take vital signs, and more. In addition, there are promo videos for a lot of the DVDs sold in the CHA online store (link to store). There are also four sample lessons that were recorded at CHA Certification Clinics. These videos can help prepare riding instructors for a Certification Clinic and teach what to expect at a clinic. CHA adds new videos every year, so please subscribe to the YouTube channel so you don’t miss anything.
https://www.youtube.com/user/chainstructor

Twitter: For fans of Twitter, the CHA Twitter page also offers information for riding instructors, horse owners, and other horse lovers. Links are provided for further information. Those who wish to share CHA’s posts are encouraged to retweet. One thing to note with Twitter is that updates about the CHA International Conference use the hashtag #CHAiCON.
https://twitter.com/chainstructors

Pinterest: CHA loves the visual aspect of Pinterest. After all, there is a lot that can be shared about horses visually. At this time, CHA’s Pinterest presence has 25 boards and more than 500 pins, and it is growing all of the time. Board topics include equestrian lingo, riding exercises, disciplines, trail riding, emergency preparedness, equipment, horse shows, equestrian getaways, barn design, equine holiday ideas, breeds, horses in movies and TV, and much more. Please feel free to re-pin CHA’s pins and add CHA to your Pinterest experience.
https://www.pinterest.com/chainstructors/

LinkedIn: Since CHA is a membership organization in which its members are business professionals (instructors, horse industry professionals, trainers, etc.), then LinkedIn makes it a great place for members to connect. CHA’s LinkedIn Group has almost 900 members. Members are free to start discussions, connect with each other, and share news that is relevant to group members.

More Facebook

Facebook Regional Fan Pages or Groups: Many of CHA’s Regional Directors have created pages or groups associated with their CHA region, so that they can share news for their members.

Region 1 Page: https://www.facebook.com/charegion1

Region 1 Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CHARegion1

Region 2 Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/charegion2

Region 3 Page: https://www.facebook.com/CHARegion3

Region 4 Page: https://www.facebook.com/CHARegion4

Region 6 Page: https://www.facebook.com/Certified-Horsemanship-Association-Region-6-160014504121741/timeline/

Region 7 Page: https://www.facebook.com/CHA-Region-7-199189846758224

Region 8 Page: https://www.facebook.com/CHARegion8

Region 10 Page: https://www.facebook.com/CHARegion10

In addition to connecting with us on social media platforms, CHA also offers continuous updates on the following webpages or website sections on its main website. These include:

Guest Announcements for CHA’s Radio Segment on Horses in the Morning: https://cha.horse/education#horse-radio-show

The CHA Way Blog Posts: http://cha-ahse.org/store/blog/

2015 CHA International Conference updates: https://cha.horse/international-conference/

Webinars:

Products for Sale on our Online Store:

Updates to the Clinic Schedule for Certification and Skills Clinics:

Job Openings:

Sarah Evers Conrad is currently the Digital Content Editor at Horse Illustrated and Young Rider magazines. She also owns All In Stride Marketing. She is an award-winning equestrian journalist with a background in magazine publishing, feature writing, news and event coverage, editing, digital marketing, social media, and website management. Conrad has been published in equine publications such as The Horse, Blood-Horse, Equestrian, Arabian Horse Life, USDF Connection, the American Quarter Horse Journal, Paint Horse Journal, Off-Track Thoroughbred, Stable Management, Camp Business magazine, Lexington Family magazine, and HorsesDaily.com and DressageDaily.com. She is also the current editor for the Certified Horsemanship Association’s official publication, The Instructor magazine. Conrad has also edited several books, including CHA’s “The Equine Professional Manual—The Art of Teaching Riding.” Learn more at www.equestrianjournalist.com.